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17

Going from a wide shot, then suddenly zooming in on a character or detail is a "crash zoom", "whip zoom", or "snap zoom". Used correctly, its a technique to quickly give the audience an overview of the situation, then rapidly immerse them. When done precisely it can add impact to the action on screen. When done imprecisely, ...


4

I always knew this to be called a "snap zoom" but Wikipedia also calls it a "whip zoom". From what I've noticed, it is borrowed from war documentary photographers who were literally in the fray of battle and so would often have to just instantly zoom on something to capture it on film before it was over. It's become very popular in ...


29

As far as I can tell, this is a riff on the classic 'crash zoom' effect, which in my personal experience started to become popular in visual effect shots around 2002, first becoming popular in the remake of Battlestar Galactica and of course, Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones. Historically popular in horror films, the shots as shown in the more ...


-1

According to this review: And to break up the action, Hector’s inner child makes the occasional appearance, alongside his childhood dog. The ultimate point is clear: Hector needs to grow up. He’s yet another in the ranks of 21st-century cinematic man-children making a belated journey to maturity.


0

This is probably done with a camera trick. However, I would point out that a similar thing can be performed to a live audience using an effect called Pepper's Ghost. Disney's Haunted Mansion uses it to produce transparent figures. A large glass screen, set at an angle, catches a reflection from a brightly lit actor in an area hidden from the audience. Not ...


1

In short, with the stationary camera, a still image of the set is captured. This still image is then split into halves* (one half for Andy's chair, and one half for Conan's chair). The two "empty desk set" photos are overlaid onto the live camera image. For the start of the bit, the opacity is set to 0% (transparency at 100%). During the bit, the ...


9

One other reason they probably went with the anamorphic CinemaScope aspect-ratio is that it best-enables them to take advantage of this brand new technology they're using for the special-effects in lieu of a greenscreen, as can be seen in this YouTube video: Screenshot: In short, they now have a cylindrical chamber that is 1 ...


48

According to this article: Cinematographers Greig Fraser, ASC, ACS and Barry “Baz” Idoine and showrunner Jon Favreau employ new technologies to frame the Disney Plus Star Wars series. [...] Shot on Arri’s Alexa LF, The Mandalorian was the maiden voyage for Panavision’s full-frame Ultra Vista 1.65x anamorphic lenses. The 1.65x anamorphic squeeze allowed for ...


38

It's shot in anamorphic widescreen - the same ratio as many movies (2.39:1). "Why" could be either… Because of the lenses they chose* or It's fashionable. Letterboxing is 'cool' They used to letterbox music videos in the 80's back when everyone still had square TVs, to make them 'look like movies'. Take your pick. Since many home TV screens ...


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