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6

From this interview with the 3 directors, Bob Persichetti said (emphasis mine): For example, all our animation is on twos. In standard film, you shoot 24 frames per second. In old traditional hand-drawn animation, you would draw 12 drawings per second. Every other frame was repeated to give a certain crispness to the movement. If you wanted something to ...


2

Looking at the differnce between these two pictures, the first one has sharper lighting coming from the windows, and some of the characters are correctly lit by this light, others are not. So this is probably where some error in production happen, with the doubled characters being dark and light, meaning, their lighter version were meant to be moved only a ...


2

Fred Silverman's explanation cited in F1Krazy's answer has always suffered from the fact - as noted in the comments - that Sinatra sings 'doo be doo be doo'. (Frank, incidentally, reputedly described Strangers in the Night as 'the worst f*ing song I've ever heard' - but that's neither here nor there.) Scoubidou is the name of a 1959 hit (in France) for ...


74

Here is a video of Fred Silverman, CBS' head of daytime programming back in 1969, discussing the creation of Scooby-Doo. Starting at about 1:40, he describes hearing "Strangers in the Night" while on a plane and conceiving the Scooby-Doo name on the spot: On the plane, I couldn't sleep -- y'know, it was a Red-Eye, and I'm listening to music -- and as we'...


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