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3

Think of it as a disclaimer. Its saying, "This work isn't non-fiction, but it's not fiction either." Its trying to absolve itself from all responsibility that writers of either type of work might have. A non-fictional work has the issue that there are loads of people around who fancy themselves experts on history and/or recent events, and if you get some ...


5

Westerns are set in the Wild West, which is more or less an exaggerated version of a real region, the western two thirds of the USA, during a real time, usually the 19th century, and mostly in a few decades between about 1860 and 1900. And because westerns are more or less historical fiction, historical people, places, things, and events are often mentioned ...


3

There are no real official rules. You don't have a Hollywood Genre Classification Board that has clearly defined rules for each and every genre a movie may use based on the contents and punishes movies if they end up using different genres. Movies being an art form, the decision for what labels to stick on a movie are left to the production team. However, ...


72

There are no rules as to when or how the term "Based on a true story/real events" can be used. Sometimes it is a legit claim, but sometimes it is a pure marketing decision to fool the audience. Basically you have 4 types of movies that make this claim: The fake true story Movies claiming to be based on real events, but are not. Example: The Blair Witch ...


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