New answers tagged

-1

As others mentioned, the goal was to minimize framerate, and 24 fps is (arguably) the lowest speed that gives smooth motion. However, minimizing framerate is not just about minimizing the cost of the film (although that is a factor). Keeping the shutter open longer also maximizes picture quality, just like in photography.


2

Most of what @BCdotWEB posted in their answer is correct, although I've never heart of the even frame rate requirement before. 16-18 fps was used a lot in the 1910s, but by the late 1920s, most cameramen were filming around 24 fps if not higher. Of course slower rates were always used for comic effect in chase scenes. Everything that you ever wanted to ...


48

According to this site: In the early days of film cameras were hand cranked, which caused inconsistencies from movie to movie. Even further still, projection houses would speed up frame rates of movies to get that one extra projection at the end of the day. It wouldn’t be until 1929, with the introduction of the optical sound track, that the standard of ...


5

The facts are that the lowest framerate that can be used to make the pictures move is 16 FPS but the more, the better and smoother the movie gets. Thomas Edison believed that the optimal framerate should be 46 FPS, however, the cameras and projectors were not that fast and the film on which the movies were shot was expensive, to 46 FPS was too much. Most ...


5

Because the owners of the cars keep them like that. I will base my answer on three sources: Barn Find Hunter series by Hagerty on Youtube. In on of the episodes Tom Cotter visits a collector who have acres of old cars. Because he lives close to LA he have a stash of that he take care of because he rent them. For movies, music videos, events. So I assume ...


10

In the early years of The Daily Show this was a manual process: The story of an early segment called “Bush v. Bush” is described by writer Steve Bodow as a “Rosetta stone” and with good reason. The Daily Show realized that the strongest commentary on a politician lying was just juxtaposed footage of the politician saying two contradictory things on ...


1

No... They clearly acted together...here's one example Now, it's possible that some scenes (or coverage) were filmed using stand-ins. Morgan Freeman is not a young man and you don't necessarily need him to actually be in shot when all you are doing is actually shooting the back of his head.


84

It seems they did use scripted dialogue. From the article Silent Movie Revisited with an emphasis of mine, Third, one should also stress the important contribution of this book to the critical reappraisal of many stereotypes concerning the early years of the cinema, such as the (completely false) idea that silent movies were not scripted or that the ...


9

When the "good guy" team is preparing, they mention that they'll start the battle at the crack of dawn. Strategically it's good, because the bad guys will have morning sunlight in their faces, making it harder for them to see. IIRC they also mention that a storm will be rolling in early in the morning. So the battle starts just before sunrise, when it's ...


4

It's not really about bad editing/scripting, it's more about keeping the action moving and the audience entertained without having to get bogged down in explaining everything. If, after an action scene at night, our cuddly protagonists erect a tent and cook beans over an open fire before continuing more action scenes in daytime, audiences would get bored ...


8

Because the sequences are edited. You may be watching an edit assembled from several takes and entire lines of dialogue may be omitted at the editing stage. On some shoots, there may only be one camera. This means the scene has to be shot from one angle, performed multiple times, then the reverse shot set up, performed multiple times and an edit assembled, ...


4

Mostly because of deals with networks. Consider this - I have the same feeling about Jeopardy. You can't even find a compilation from way back on VHS. Nothing official. Netflix and contour, etc, they only offer what is packaged for whatever reasons they decide, not necessarily public appeal. The thought behind this is that people will have a higher ...


0

I'd say that directors do not have much input into designing the poster, since they are usually made by third-party design studios, with more then one of these usually competing to make the best and be chosen by the marketing staff of the movie studio. Source


21

They were not influenced by Zimmer Michael Price and David Arnold answered this in an interview: How much of an influence was Hans Zimmer's score from the Sherlock Holmes movie? Regarding the film...I suppose it's not unusual to have a violin-led approach to the character of Sherlock. It's not unusual for composers to come up with a similar ...


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