52

Biff didn't actually have to use the same plutonium-driven Delorean that Marty had to use in the 1st part. He used the Delorean that Doc had modified based on 2015 technology, which didn't need the high energy of plutonium to operate anymore rather than just garbage (nor did it need any roads either). We see this in the beginning of the film, where Doc just ...


49

Predestination For his final assignment, a top temporal agent must pursue the one criminal that has eluded him throughout time. The chase turns into a unique, surprising and mind-bending exploration of love, fate, identity and time travel taboos. Near the end of the movie : After returning to that day, John encounters Jane, and when they begin ...


37

The Doc Brown in 1955 is younger than the Doc Brown in 1885, by 30 years. The Doc Brown in 1955 will still live for another 30 years before traveling back to 1885 and being shot by Buford.


36

Speculation: Old Biff returns to the changed 2015 (designated 2015A). Doc and Marty "transitioned" to 2015A without noticing. Why didn't they notice? Maybe because they were out on the street when it happened and Hilldale looks the same in 2015A. BTW, time travelers "transitioning" between changed timelines is implied by Doc Brow when he tells Marty not to ...


35

She is "insurance" that the virus will successfully be spread around the world. The key is that the scientists were never interested in stopping the virus in 1995. As Cole says early on, "I just have to locate the virus in its original form before it mutates. So scientists can come back and study it and find a cure. So that those of us who survived can ...


35

You do have a point in that the fuel could have been syphoned. However, it's more likely that there just wasn't any. When the doc gets back to 1885 with broken time circuits, he first tries to fix it. When he realizes it can't be fixed, he buries the car in the mine after first draining it of all fluids. While it is unclear if the car could be dug up, it ...


30

If you take the movie as allegory this question — and the movie — become sublime. While I like wbogacz's and DVK's answers very much, I humbly suggest they are incomplete. It's about more than overcoming selfishness or solipsism (all about me) or even insufficient solipsism, as keen an insight as that is. For me the answer to the original question comes ...


25

From reading the books I'd say that in a sense a Time-Turner can't really be used to change the past at all. In The Prisoner of Azkaban, Harry and Hermione use the Time-Turner around midnight to travel back three hours in time, endeavoring to save Sirius and Buckbeak. However, everything they do in these three hours has already happened: At the end of ...


24

It was a miracle of God intervening in his life. For whatever reason, he was permitted to experience reality over and over and over again, while fully cognizant and fully remembering everything prior. It's like conscious reincarnation, each day being a new life, only with him starting out as a 45 yro instead of an infant. After thousands of days, he had ...


24

This is The Fantastic Journey. It's actually from the late 70s rather than the 80s. The show revolves round a group of people shipwrecked or lost on an island in the Bermuda Triangle where different timezones are intermingled and interact. The main cast travel from place to place, trying to get home. It was cancelled after a single series of 10 episodes. ...


21

In all the Back to the Future movies, a major component of the plot is reality taking time to catch up to events. Typically, this is represented as pictures with gradually changing features, which the protagonists are trying to prevent from changing. Marty's family photo in the first movie, and the tombstone in the third are examples of this. From this ...


21

I believe that the movie has nothing to do with time travel and, as Oliver_C mentioned in a comment, the butterfly effect is not an ability, it is just cause-effect gone to extremes ("Does the flap of a butterfly’s wings in Brazil set off a tornado in Texas?"). The following lines are solely based on my own interpretation of the movie, hence no external ...


19

Cole's assignment was not to stop the virus, but to locate the source. The insurance person I believe was sent to get a sample. The virus will spread, because it already has. The goal to the time travelers was to figure out (in the future) how to combat the virus. Edit: Here is my take on how time travel works (IMHO); Anything that is known in the future ...


18

It is implied that something happens in the future. We are left to assume it has something to do with Rachel dying or being injured some time in the future. Now if we followed the events that are implied to have happened, we would have watched Abe and Aaron grieve over her death, remember that the boxes have been running since before her death and then they ...


18

First of all, you have some parts wrong in your timeline and are missing others. So lets go through it again step by step: The time taken to travel from Earth to the wormhole is 2yrs. Check, aggregate = 2. After that we don't know how much time passed on Earth while they were travelling the wormhole. Could be 10yrs judging from the ...


17

Caveat: Looking for logic in time-travel movies is an exercise in recursive futility. The idea in 12 Monkeys is that the past is, in many ways, read only. You can go back and "read" all you want, but you won't be able to "write" anything that will (meaningfully) change the timeline. Alternatively, you can attempt to change an event, but since the timeline ...


16

The caricature of insurance people is that they are like leeches -- that they make their living off of people's fear. Mortality rates and actuarials are not appealing topics. Their paradox is that without tragedy, insurance wouldn't be a viable business. This conception has existed for years -- well before the bad behavior and negative publicity insurance ...


16

I've only seen the movie once, but when Jeffrey Price shows us the case with the single time travel device in it, there was an empty space next to it that suggested he had two devices.


16

Here's a neat diagram that will help you see the events happening in a chronology. (Source : Predestination Timeline Explained) The link has a lot more detailed explanation. Follow it from the Pink, to the Blue to the Green for chronology. It would be: 1) Jane left at orphanage 2) Jane meets and falls in love with an unknown man (John) 3) Unknown man (...


13

I think it's just because the "loop" in which Joe kills himself is that final loop, and something like killing someone is irreversible. But who knows, another Looper that knows Joe could come back and kill Joe before he kills that boy, and so in that loop the boy will live. Basically there are many loops with many different versions of our world, depending ...


13

I think the intention is that it's a lot easier and cleaner to have someone on the other side there to make sure the victim is taken care of, rather than just popping them to a location that they'll die at. Think about it this way. Lets say that they did pop people into a furnace to kill them. What happens if said furnace is down that day and the victim ...


13

TL;DR: Terminator 1 appeared to follow the predestination ideology, where going back in time meant that John Connor and Kyle Reese fulfilled their roles, rather than changing anything. Terminator 2 played much more with the idea of both fate and free will. By exercising free will, the future was changed. Of course it can be argued that intent is ...


11

Who is to say they DIDN'T notice and comment on it... but we didn't see it? What would they have said anyway? Lorraine: Wow, Marty! You look just like a highschool friend of ours. (To George) Honey, c'mere! Look at Marty. Doesn't he look like that friend of yours, Kevin? George: You mean Calvin? Oh yeah, he does! Shame we don't have any photos ...


11

I'm not sure about the movie, but in the book he does meet himself a few times. I particularly remember an incident when teenage Henry met himself and decided to ... experiment.


11

It would seem logical to me that any form of time travel would imply spacial travel as well. The earth is constantly rotating on its axis and orbiting the sun. If you traveled through time but not space (i.e. ended up in the same exact point in space) then you might end up in the vacuum of space, or even the interior of the earth. That being said, if the ...


11

There are two logical ways of dealing with time travel paradoxes: Stable time loop. When you travel to the past, whatever you do, you won't actually change anything (which pretty much implies there is no free will). In fiction, the way this is often done is that the time traveller attempts to change the past, but doesn't succeed, because it was him who ...


11

This sounds very much like a description of H.G. Wells' The Time Machine. It has been adapted to film more than once, but the two most famous ones are from 1960 (which I haven't seen yet though) and from 2002, which I have seen and know that it invloves a partially destroyed moon at some point in the future. And given that you didn't say the movie itself ...


11

Marty was in the time machine when he came back. The definition of the time machine is that the machine (and what it contains) travel through time unaltered. (My real question would be, why is there just ONE Marty when he comes back to 1985 after fixing his family. There should be one Marty that was born from his parents on his normal birthdate, and one ...


10

The time travel logic of Interstellar follows the Novikov self-consistency principle (which physicist Kip Thorne, associated with the movie, did work on). Different time travel stories handle the logic of time travel in different ways. Consider the grandfather paradox, where you go back in time and kill your grandfather. In some stories, it's possible for ...


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