72

They were led to believe the moon landing was faked in order to socially engineer the public into living a sustainable lifestyle. With the Blight having devastated Earth so much that the population is believed to be around 300 million, and food a scarce commodity still, the world governments decided that the consumerist, capitalistic belief systems were not ...


51

According to Interstellar's screenwriter Jonathan Nolan: Revelation 2: The death of tech in the film, like GPS and MRI machines, is based on informational extinctions in history. Jonah Nolan: Kip and I spent a memorable afternoon with some fantastic scientists that Kip pulled together to talk through all the different ways human life could be ...


48

Christopher Nolan is, quite famously, aghast with 3D; which he perceives to be an industry forced as opposed to audience led technology... basically, its only around as a way for the film industry to make more money. Nolan is a great advocate of Film, and a great critic of the machinations of the film industry that are pushing for 3-D: "The question of 3-...


47

You pose an interesting question. It may indeed seem that this is a paradox since the humans couldn't have gone back in time to save themselves when they wouldn't have been saved in the first place. But your problem is actually that you're searching a cause out of nothing where there is none. You are basically searching for the beginning of a circle. You ...


46

Because she didn't know by then. With all the things happening in parallel on Earth and at the other end of the universe you might have confused the events a little there, but the point where Murph realizes that Cooper is her ghost is when she vistits their old house for the last time, when she tries to take Tom's children to safety and finds her old watch ...


45

Christopher Nolan has repeatedly expressed his dislike for 3D based on various reasons: For example in an interview about Inception he expressed that while interesting, 3D isn't too relevant for a movie's effect: DEADLINE: Why didn’t you shoot in 3D which studios like Warner Bros have made a priority? NOLAN: We looked at shooting Inception in 3D and ...


38

The appearance of the black hole in Interstellar was not created arbitrarily. It was actually modeled using the real relativistic equations describing the path of light in the gravitational field of a super-massive black hole spinning at near the speed of light. As a result, it may be the most accurate depiction we have to date of what such an object might ...


33

It was a booby-trap set by Mann. It was activated when his robot was rebooted and the hidden data was accessed. Mann set it to cover his tracks and hide the fact that his planet wasn't habitable.


32

This post from Bustle.com gives some good reasoning for Interstellar being set around the 2070s. In summary: the descriptions of halcyon days gone by from Cooper's live-in father-in-law Donald sound very much like our present day. Assuming Donald was born between 1980s-2000s, he may have had Cooper's (now deceased) wife around 2030-2035. Cooper is in his ...


30

I think the details what caused earth's current state are left a bit unclear and that on purpose. What we know is, that there are two different aspects to earth's devastating state: There is the blight which attacks and destroys the crops, causing a major sustenation problem on earth and in parallel intoxicating the atmosphere, gradually making it ...


29

Since only one system with 3 worlds show promise, we can infer that the other 9 astronauts are dead. Either they didn't make it to their worlds or they landed on uninhabitable worlds. PROFESSOR BRAND Twelve possible worlds. Twelve Ranger launches carrying the bravest humans ever to live, led by the remarkable Dr Mann. DOYLE Each ...


28

The only way Murph could know is when that information came from Brand herself. Therefore we must assume that the quantum data Cooper send to Earth/Murph was also able to fix the one-directional communication problem through the worm hole.


27

The same question was also asked on Quora, with various interesting answers, even if it's hard to say which one is correct and they all sound quite plausible. Everyone seems to agree though, that both Lander and Ranger are very much capable of planetary lift-offs and could as well have left earth on their own. Remains the question why they chose a rocket-...


27

It wasn't said in the movie as far as I know. It's from the first teaser trailer: For the record, IMDb usually labels those with a "[from trailer]" disclaimer, but didn't here for some reason.


26

The slightly larger gravity on Miller's planet doesn't necessarily drag the waves down into smaller waves. In fact the waves were actually caused by an external force, namely the planet's very close proximity to the supermassive black hole Gargantua. Physicist Kip Thorne, who co-produced and advised the movie, has elaborated on that a bit in his book The ...


26

The cause is that all of humanity is concerned on making food to survive, so most of people are farmers, there is a shortage of engineers who could make and operate such machines, as well as the fact that it is very expensive to use MRI. There is no need for MRI machines when most of the people are dying from starvation, not diseases which need MRI scans.


24

First of all, we have to remember that Mann was a coward. Upon arriving on his planet, he realized it was uninhabitable but didn't want to die alone, and as such sent out a beacon to say he had found a Goldilocks habitat, so a rescue mission would be launched to find him. Cooper, believing that they had found a suitable habitat for colonization (based on ...


23

He wasn't "in" the black hole. You can't go "into" a black hole. It's not a hole. It's a singularity. So, no, you can't "get out of a black hole". But since he wasn't "in" it there's no problem. He had been transported into the tesseract, a three-dimensional representation of a five-dimensional world constructed by advanced future humans, for the purpose of ...


23

"Hypersleep Pods (a.k.a. "the long nap") are used to slow the ageing process of the human body so that astronauts do not incur excessive senescence and not overly consume limited supplies while on their missions." reference Romily clearly states that he had slept for a while.


23

It rotates to create artificial gravity A rotating space station is a known concept (apparently Tsiolkovsky thought about it in the very beginning of 20th century). It uses the rotation to induce a centripetal (acting towards the centre) acceleration on the people inside. In order for a body to stay in motion with constant speed in a circular path with ...


22

The 'They' being referred to is (at this point in the movie) some unknown, supposedly extra-terrestrial higher knowledge that is manipulating gravity to send messages in Binary, and Morse code. For some reason, they are directing NASA on Earth towards a solution to their planet's exhaustion; which is why when Coop shows up at the base after following the co-...


22

When a large bright object is in your field of view, smaller dimmer objects are effectively hidden. This is because your eyes adapt to the bright light. Cameras will also adapt to the bright light and so will not pick up the dimmer objects. This optical effect has been replicated in the film. It is therefore more accurate than any number of space films ...


20

It's a nod to Moon landing conspiracy theories. You either believe it or not but it's one of the most famous conspiracy theories that the US staged their moon landing to trick the world. Interstellar just used it in the film as a nod to it. Many other films/TV shows also did it. Now let's come to your main question. Why were people lead to believe that ...


19

Well, you might also ask, how did Murph know Dr. Brand has reached the new planet at all. I guess Dr. Brand must have sent a message from the new planet, which informed others that she was there and she was alone. There might have been plans to reach out to her soon, only that Cooper could wait no longer and he immediately sets off for her.


19

I have to contradict Ankit's otherwise theoretically sound answer, be it just because it is a bit too negative for such an optimistic movie. In the first minutes of the movie Cooper at least gives us his and his late wife's own interpretation of Murphy's Law (and the reason why he named his daughter after it), which I would extrapolate to also be the movie's ...


18

In the scene where Murph is an adult and is in the room trying to figure out the puzzle of what was communicating through the books, she gets the 'aha' moment where she realizes that it is her father somehow communicating. The 'stay' message is crucial to her figuring this out. When she first examines the watch she only gives it a quick glance and sees that ...


18

Gargantua was a "real" black hole, but with a little artificial extra in it. Neither does the movie say that all black holes are artificial, nor that this wasn't a real black hole. It is true that the "Bulk Beings" somehow planted the tesseract in the black hole in order to save Cooper and facilitate his time-defying communication with his daughter, but ...


18

First of all, you have some parts wrong in your timeline and are missing others. So lets go through it again step by step: The time taken to travel from Earth to the wormhole is 2yrs. Check, aggregate = 2. After that we don't know how much time passed on Earth while they were travelling the wormhole. Could be 10yrs judging from the ...


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