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123

There is an episode of the docu-series The Movies That Made Us (a spin-off of The Toys That Made Us) that is about the making of "Die Hard". Writer Steven E. de Souza had this to say about the audience reaction when the trailer hit theaters: ... when Bruce Willis came up, the audience laughed ... some people even said they weren't just laughing at the ...


87

This award-winning poster art conveys many of the movie's themes and plot points: Clarice's skin is pale (in stark contrast to the darkness surrounding her) and blue like a corpse while her blue eyes had turned red, representing the film's themes of death, danger and virtue confronted with a malvolent influence (Lecter's eyes are red in the books, and ...


67

The film has two posters The two beautifully minimalist posters of Yorgos Lanthimos’ dystopian movie The Lobster have been created by Greek designer Vasilis Marmatakis (cofounder, but no longer part, of MNP). The pair of posters feature once Colin Farrell, once Rachel Weisz, embracing a person-shaped void. - src And from IMDb plot synopsis: ...


52

She not exactly caught in the trap...she's there to attract a predator to catch him in the trap. Wikipedia Basically, she's using herself as bait in the trap.


40

It is probably a combination of the decisions of graphic designers (who may not agree with you that there is necessarily a 'proper' way to do this). Plus the order of names in credits and posters is carefully negotiated in contracts with the stars. In the example above Nick Stahl probably got top billing, and negotiated his name to be first in all ...


34

This is a great question and I think Ian nailed it - but I also wanted to bring up the classic story of The Towering Inferno: Stars Paul Newman and Steve McQueen apparently argued intensely over who should get top billing. In the end the producers settled for a compromise: reading the film poster (which is reproduced as the DVD cover) top to bottom, Paul ...


34

In addition to Ankit Sharma's answer, I think there's a second meaning. During the movie, the short-sighted woman (Rachel Weisz) loses her sight. She's no longer able to see the person she loves. (And she loses it because she loves him.) It's implied at the end of the movie that David (Collin Ferrel) is going to blind himself, leaving him also unable to see ...


30

Following up on the answer by @Oliver_C I've managed to find that ads lacking Bruce Willis were indeed featured in newspapers. For example, here's a clip from a The Journal News on July 12th 1988: Similar ads were posted on July 12th-14th by The Miami News, The Record, The Philadelphia Enquirer and The Daily News. These newspapers had a version of the ...


26

For me, it feels like it's based on a few reasons. That being said, I haven't found sources for these, it's solely my analysis. Symmetry. The word 'nun' is a palindrome, and a mirrored N makes it symmetric and visually appealing. Duality. Valak is a Demon, disguised as a Nun. He is the King of Hell, and is trapped in the house of God. He is the master of ...


25

I agree with the other persons interpretation that it is Schindler's hand holding / saving the Jews. But still the movie had one tragic aspect saying "Schindler could not save them all": The whole movie is black and white, but there is one girl with a red coat seen all over the movie in different places. And in one of the last scenes the red coat is seen ...


20

The posters implied that Luke and Leia were a romantic couple… Indeed the promotional posters and artwork implied Luke and Leia had some romantic spark going on. The posters themselves were reminiscent of classic Hollywood poster art tropes and film cliches of a brave hero (usually a man) rescuing a “damsel in distress” (damsels are usually women). But ...


19

The poster very accurately depicts the events in the film. That baby's hand represents the Jews survivors and that grown man's hand represent Oskar Schindler himself. This is about how he holds the hand(s) of Jews and ultimately saved them. If you look closely, the poster shows the Schindler's List as well. From IMDb Saul Bass was asked to design the ...


12

It's not that he was excluded, but given he was only seen as the comedic character David Addison in Moonlighting the studio was possibly nervous about featuring Willis. The poster you ask about is this: As you can see the Nakatomi building is as important, showing the action which people might not assume from a picture of Willis. There is also heavy ...


10

Because the film is a dramatization of real events, most people (in the U.S., anyway) already know that Sully was successful in landing the plane. The film is designed to show people what they may not know, all of the drama before and after. Showing the plane's successful landing isn't a spoiler because it's a matter of public record. From Wikipedia: ...


9

I took it to be an intentional misdirection since the 12 Monkeys are a MacGuffin, a "...plot device in the form of some goal, desired object, or other motivator that the protagonist pursues, often with little or no narrative explanation. The specific nature of a MacGuffin is typically unimportant to the overall plot." Plus, the placement in his eye ...


9

From this detailed analysis, The close-up shot depicting the joining of two hands is very powerful, symbolising unity and alliance as the Jewish people cannot make a difference on their own, and the bond between Schindler and 'his jews' is ultimately triumphant as he manages to save thousands of lives. The fact that it appears to be a child's hand joining ...


8

It seems to me that the most logical reason is to make sales. Looking at the bottom of the poster, you can see that Jennifer Aniston received top billing for this series (or, at the very least - on this poster). Through most of the show's runtime - Rachel (Jennifer Anniston) remained an incredibly popular figure in the series, with several of the shows key ...


7

It's a stylistic device. It's used to present your main hero(es) or characters as the primary part of the movie. For instance, Star Wars. Clearly the character images are dispropotionate to their actual size and in relation to each other.


7

I think it's because the functions are separate. Agents determine the order of the performers' names for publicity, but the art work of the poster is not created until much later, probably just before the film is released. Since it may incorporate a scene or collection of screenshots that need to be aesthetically pleasing, the order of the names previously ...


6

Axelrod has the correct answer. Another angle, however, is that in Star Wars: A New Hope, they essentially were somewhat romantically connected. In fact, that was pretty much a sub-plot… Han and Luke competing for the the attention of the princess. And that’s fine, given that Leia and Luke—and the audience—weren’t aware that they were siblings at that ...


5

Adding to Paulie_D's answer and fleshing out cde's, the image is also a literal interpretation of the title (which is metaphorical). So, considering Big Trouble in Little China, Kurt Russel (the big trouble) is shown to be so much larger in the image than everyone else (the little china). Not only does this emphasize Kurt Russel's role as the main ...


5

As mentioned in the question, the top left poster appears to be a parody of Vertigo. As for the others, here are my best guesses, based on the image shape and style, and the text which appear to be both common nightmare or dream themes, and oblique references to the movies they parody, plus suggestions from the comments: Top Left: Vertigo Top Middle: Peter ...


5

BlueMoon93's answer seems spot-on, to me, particularly the part about inversion connoting subtle corruption or infestation. We see the same principle of "invert a random letter to indicate demonic stuff" happening in at least one other recent (2012) horror movie — not coincidentally, also nun-themed.


4

My first reaction was "Cameron did 'True Lies'?". So that may be the thing, You may know the director and know he's famous. You may not know for what he's famous from. Second thing is that all those movies are kinda action movies with shooting and futuristic gadgets. A things that was lacking in Titanic. So that would bring to cinemas people who like ...


4

I was looking for the same last week after watching the movie when I found this on Reddit. This looks like the correct explanation and makes sense. The triangle represents three components of the human psyche; Id, Ego, and Super Ego. Here is the source Reddit discussion page.


4

Short Answer: The entire movie is set in a Food Court/coffee shop. The poster is showing some of the props used by Kali from the movie. It is showing the items arranged on Kali's (Kajal Aggarwal) table. Long Answer: The First Look poster gives a glimpse of props possessed by Kali with her. The poster shows a coffee cup in the center surrounded by ...


4

Although I can't find a proper official source, from what I found it's the effect called The Backwards R(The Backwards Я effect). My first Analysis TvTropes states that The Nun is the earliest film in The Conjuring series chronologically, taking place in 1952, which also confirmed by producer Peter Safran. From cinemablend During the filming of ...


3

He's definitely the bad guy — but even if it's a great character (played by a great actor), don't forget that: He doesn't get too much screen time. There's an important plot twist revealing his "dark" nature. So, basically, they didn't want to spoil the movie ;-) Fett, on the contrary, is far more known and recognizable.


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