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It's widely known as Breaking the Fourth Wall. Breaking the fourth wall is when a character acknowledges their fictionality, by either indirectly or directly addressing the audience. Alternatively, they may interact with their creator (the author of the book, the director of the movie, the artist of the comic book, etc.). Wikipedia elaborates about the ...


73

There are no rules as to when or how the term "Based on a true story/real events" can be used. Sometimes it is a legit claim, but sometimes it is a pure marketing decision to fool the audience. Basically you have 4 types of movies that make this claim: The fake true story Movies claiming to be based on real events, but are not. Example: The Blair Witch ...


72

Originally the word was used to describe large bombs dropped during World War II that could quite literally destroy an entire city block, or a "blockbuster bomb". The origins of the term when it comes to film, according to Wikipedia: In film, a number of terms were used to describe a hit. In the 1970s these included: "spectacular" (The Wall Street ...


61

In addition to Walt's great answer, I'd like to add... Losing the "suspension of disbelief" When something happens that "breaks the illusion of fantasy" for the audience, you could say the audience is no longer willing/able to suspend their disbelief. Definition: Suspension of disbelief or willing suspension of disbelief is a term coined in 1817 by ...


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TLDR: A "Soap" is a serialized show that's about ordinary people having interpersonal drama. There's not a high concept, story arc, external villains, or greater purpose. Don't confuse "serialized" and "soap opera". Not Serialized What serialization isn't: From the 1960s to 1990s, in the vast majority of TV shows, every episode starts the same, and ...


44

As it happens, Priceonomics has already investigated this: Built in the early 1900s, the United States’ first permanent movie theaters featured only one screen. Things worked a bit differently back then: you’d pay your nickel, take a seat, and watch a continuous loop of a feature (mixed with cartoon interludes) for as long as your heart desired. ...


44

"Drama" is usually meant to indicate fiction. I've generally understood historical/period drama as: Historical drama - a drama based on historical events Period drama - a drama based in a particular time or period, not obviously based on real events So, The Crown would be a historical drama Follows the political rivalries and romance of Queen ...


40

According to Etymology Online, the term pilot has been used since the 1920s to mean "serving as a prototype". It is this sense that you get terms like pilot episode for a TV Show, or pilot program for an emerging technology. If you go back further in time, there was an old sense of pilot as far back as the 1600s meaning "to guide". For example, in ...


40

TLDR: The word is from a World War II bomb, and its usage in media dates back to the first war films and the media which made word plays out of this fact to describe the films as "block busters". Google Etymology metrics track common usage of the word by the public, outside of specialist reporting, to start to grow in the 1970s (likely with big ...


40

Bollywood is a portmanteau (a blend of linguistic words), which is derived from Bombay (currently known as Mumbai) and Hollywood, California. The name "Bollywood" is a portmanteau derived from Bombay, India, (the former name for Mumbai) and Hollywood, California, the center of the American film industry. Bollywood does not exist as a physical place. Some ...


40

These abbreviations represent the type of scene and the area where it's being filmed. From this glossary and this page from abbreviations used in movie scripts, EXT. => Exterior INT. => Interior O.S. => Abbreviation for Off Screen, denoting that the speaker is not resident within the scene. V.O. => Abbreviation for Voice Over, denoting ...


38

1) Hollywood: 1, 2 The name Hollywood was coined by H. J. Whitley, the “Father of Hollywood.” Whitely bought 500 acres from E. C. Hurd; Hurd’s wife’s friend (stay with me here), Daeida Wilcox, co-opted the name “Hollywood” from her neighbor, Ivar Weid, who lived in what was then called Holly Canyon. According to the diary of H. J. Whitley, ...


36

Not sure if there is a term of art in Cinematography to refer to the suspense aspect, but the editing technique is a film transition called an L-Cut. An L Cut is an editing technique that results in a cut occurring at a different time for audio than for video. For example, we may hear characters' voices a few seconds before we see them on film. In order ...


36

It's not specific to horror movies, but the event or action that kicks off the plot of a movie is typically called it's inciting incident. This is a literary term that applies to almost anything with a plot. Usually there is a short portion of the movie, the "setup" or "backstory", then some seemingly minor event that triggers all of the players to start ...


34

Is this movie industry jargon? Yes, it is. A "Runner" is an industry term for a low level staff member..a so-called (in US parlance) "gopher" because they "go for things". A runner is an entry-level position, the most junior role in the production department of a broadcast, film or video company. As a runner, you'll act as a general assistant, ...


33

2 different terms cover it. Docufiction: is the cinematographic combination of documentary and fiction, this term often meaning narrative film. It is a film genre which attempts to capture reality such as it is (as direct cinema or cinéma vérité) and which simultaneously introduces unreal elements or fictional situations in narrative in order to ...


31

Wikipedia's Film Editing page defines many of these cuts. I will try to summarize the questioned ones here. Editor's Cut: An editor's cut (sometimes referred to as the "Assembly edit" or "Rough cut") is normally the first pass of what the final film will be when it reaches picture lock. Additional: The article says that editing starts right after ...


30

The screenwriting term for what you describe is a "prelap". Prelap — Wikipedia Prelap is a screenwriting term that means the dialogue from the next scene precedes the cut, and the beginning of the dialogue is heard in the outgoing scene Prelaps can be of sound or dialogue, or anything non-visual, since a visual would indicate a direct cut to ...


25

TL;DR "A-list" actors are exceptionally successful, their notoriety extends beyond the silver screen, and their name guarantees a box office hit. Long Explanation: As per Oxford Definition: A real or imaginary list of the most celebrated or sought-after individuals, especially in show business. And from Wikipedia: A-list is a term that alludes to ...


25

There are multiple tropes for it: TV Tropes has a index for such tropes : I Have Your Index: It may shock you to know that I Have Your Index. How I came to obtain it is not important at this particular point in time. All that is important is that I'm willing to give it back . . . for a price. Which got two related tropes: I Have Your Wife The Big ...


22

It's unknown: Why off-color movies were called “blue” remains a matter of conjecture. Although one definition of “blue” has been “lewd” since the 19th century, its application to movies might have referred to the 19th-century Blue Laws morality codes and state and local laws based on them, of which dirty movies would certain run afoul. Other ...


21

Generally, these abbreviations you see indicate a society or union that person is a member of. Since such societies are very distinctive and respected ones, people add it to their names in credits. Just like when one has Ph.D. degree, he/she would prefix Dr. or suffix Ph.D. in his/her name. 1. A.C.E. It stands for American Cinema Editors, a society for ...


21

Specifically, it's a sub trope of Plot Twists called a "Twist Ending". A plot twist can happen at any time in the film. When it happens near the end to change the meaning of the entire film, it is a twist ending. The idea is to lead the audience on throughout the film then when they least expect it, flip the script on them only at the end. An anti-climax ...


20

A soundtrack can often include complementary popular music and may not be original to the movie. Soundtracks can also offer a complete experience when played separately from the film and some songs from it may not even be present within the film at all! A score, on the other hand, is usually non-diegetic music that compliments what is seen on screen. Film ...


15

According to an article from TV Guide, the four quadrants are split according to male or female and old or young. From another site about audience demographics, it appears the the old-young split is made at age 25. Edit: Here's an image I found on a site for independent filmmakers:


15

As the name suggests, a marathon is the sequential broadcast of a single or a number of related television programs for a long period of time; up to days if it is a TV series with many episodes. The most common reasons for a network to run a TV show marathon are: to celebrate the acquisition of a series, to lead into a highly anticipated episode of a ...


14

Well, I've found out that term is Reverse Chronology. Wikipedia gives some nice details together with the examples of use in movies & TV. Reverse chronology is a method of story-telling whereby the plot is revealed in reverse order. In a story employing this technique, the first scene shown is actually the conclusion to the plot. Once that ...


13

The trope you are thinking of is: Descended Creator This is when a crewmember or executive for a show makes an appearance in a part that would ordinarily be cast with a professional actor — or the crewmember is also an actor. This may start out as a Creator Cameo, with their original "extra" part becoming an Ascended Extra. Your Stan Lee example comes ...


12

The terms "A-list" and "Bankable star" are intricately related, and basically revolve around how much profit an actor's role in a movie can bring in for a studio. The term "A-list" has become an industry standard in Hollywood and is part of a larger guide called "James Ulmer's Hot List", in which he defines an actor's starpower as a measurement of: ...


12

They are inspired from Hollywood, Los Angeles. Wikipedia gives a full list of Hollywood inspired nick names. Hollywood-inspired nicknames, most starting with the first letter(s) of the location and ending in the letters "-ollywood" or "-wood", have been given to various locations around the world with associations to the film industry - inspired by the ...


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