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52

Tod Browning's controversial cult horror film Freaks from 1932. The central story is of this conniving trapeze artist Cleopatra, who seduces and marries sideshow midget Hans after learning of his large inheritance. At their wedding reception, the other "freaks" announce that they accept Cleopatra in spite of her being a "normal" outsider; they hold an ...


26

As far as I can tell, it comes from The Untouchables film. Films According to searches at Subzin, The Untouchables was the first with this line, but has been emulated in at least 20 other films since 2000. The Untouchables (1987) 01:21:23 Brings a knife to a gunfight. The Target Shoots First (2000) 00:17:38 What are you doing, Max? Bringing a knife to a ...


21

It's highly likely that the quote originated from The Dark Knight movie. Apparently, Batman (and other super-heroes) was inspired by Friedrich Nietzsche, a German philosopher. A lot of aspects of Batman are inspired by Nietzsche's beliefs which would explain why the movies seem very philosophical at times. Along with the fact that there seem to be no ...


17

I know this is already answered, but I was just going to keep putting up longer and longer comments. Technically the genre defining Harem Anime/Manga is Tenchi Muyo, so I think it deserves a mention. The big distinction in favor of Tenchi Muyo is the romance component. While many earlier works may feature a popular guy who is chased by many women, a harem ...


15

But the phrase is not exclusive to Trainspotting. It comes from the Bible (Deuteronomy 30:19), and the design in the pictures you posted looks like the T-shirt popularized by the Wham! video for Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go in 1984 (you can see it from the very start): The T shirt was designed by Katarine Hamnett; Wiki ...


13

In order for a city being destroyed to mean anything to the people viewing it, the city must be iconic and recognizable (unless it's fictional) and probably wants to appeal to people who either have visited or want to visit that city. This means that, in the US, there are three big options for very iconic cities with buildings that are recognizable around ...


10

There is a british film from 1900, Let me dream again, by George Albert Smith (from the so called Brighton school), you can find it in the British Film Institute archive: http://collections-search.bfi.org.uk/web/Details/ChoiceFilmWorks/150057452 The film is included in their collection "1895-1910. Early Cinema" vol. 1 In the short film, a man (G.A. Smith ...


9

According to TVTropes, the first use of this was in 1895!: [The breaking the fourth wall trope] dates back to the Lumière brothers and the first films made for publicviewing in 1895—specifically, The Photographical Congress Arrives in Lyon, in which several of the photographers wave or doff their hats to the camera. You can see more in the video. If you ...


9

Frannie Halcyon, one of the characters in Armistad Maupin's Further Tales of the City (1982), is called "Gangie" by her grandchildren: Little Edgar and his sister Anna ran across the brown lawn at Halcyon Hill and accosted their grandmother on the terrace, each tugging joyfully at a leg. "Gangie, Gangie ... look!" Frannie set her teacup down on ...


9

The Transformers are "self-configuring sentient modular extraterrestrial robotic lifeforms", originating from the planet Cybertron. They are powered by 'Energon', a source of energy ubiquitous on the Transformers' home planet and in their culture, that is not only used as a power source for themselves - consumed like food, or - and their machines, but also ...


8

Most likely this reference started it's life out as a reference to the astronauts conversation during the Apollo 8 mission, as they passed behind the moon for the first time: CapCom Gerry Carr spoke to the three astronauts more than 200,000 miles away, "Ten seconds to go. You are GO all the way." Lovell replied, "We'll see you on the other side", and ...


7

TVTropes defines this as the Not-So-Innocent Whistle In media of all types, especially comics and cartoons, the "innocent" whistle is a main staple, often played for humor. Alice, feeling mischievous, decides to, say, throw a snowball at Bob. Bob is knocked off his feet. He pulls himself up and spins around to see no one around in the area but Alice, who ...


7

"See you on the other side" is also a reference to the afterlife. It was possibly used in reference to the River Styx and the crossing of such river into the afterlife. This was the meaning Jim Morrison had when he wrote "Break On Through (To The Other Side)", which was released a year or so before the Apollo 8 mission.


7

According to Norse Mythology, the Elves were inhabitants of Aelfar, which was ruled by Freyr. They were given to Freyr in payment for losing a tooth, as referenced by one of the Eddas. Other than a couple of names of leaders, there isn't much actual Norse mythology built around the elves, much of that came later. The dwarves were said to be formed from ...


6

It is generally thought that Rumiko Takahashi (the best selling female Manga author in history) is the one who started the Harem genre, or at the very least the one who popularized it. Which one of her works can be considered as the first depends on how you define Harem anime. If you define it as one person (any gender) being romantically sought after by the ...


5

At the time, they wouldn't have yet been known as Film Noir, they would have just been Melodrama. Contenders might be… Rebecca [1941] has voiceover. The Maltese Falcon [1941] has the detective Double Indemnity [1944] Has the detective, voice-over which starts as a letter dictation then transitions into narration… The Big Sleep [1946] has no voiceover, but ...


5

In Armageddon the character Bear (Michael Clarke Duncan) says: Yo, Harry, you're the man. after Harry (Bruce Willis) detonates the bomb. [Watch clip on YouTube]


5

This is a (misattributed, according to Wiki) George S. Patton quote: Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death I shall fear no evil, because I am the meanest son-of-a-bitch in the valley. (This was a widely published anonymous derivative of Psalm 23 which arose in the early 1970s on wall-posters, plaques and t-shirts, with an early ...


4

Malekith is not from Male but Maleficum = Crime, something bad and Kith means friendship, relation also knowledge. Malekith is a man related to crime. A bad friend. And this is what he does, he sacrifices his friend and his whole race.


4

According to this interview with Teen Wolf creator Jeff Davis, the Kanima is, at least loosely, based on South American mythology. He says the original Kanima was a "were-jaguar" (that is, half-man, half-jaguar; named in analogy with "werewolf"). The Wikipedia article on the were-jaguar suggests that it may have been inspired by a venomous toad thought to ...


4

It would appear not. The name seems to have originated by his antics when audience saw him (before he had an official name) in the short Porky's Duck Hunt. Wikipedia Daffy first appeared in Porky's Duck Hunt, released on April 17, 1937. The cartoon was directed by Tex Avery and animated by Bob Clampett. Porky's Duck Hunt is a standard hunter/prey ...


4

Here's an interview with Larry Kasdan at a Writer's Guild Conference in August 2016. At 4:40 the interviewer, John August mentions that we are all lucky enough to have seen the Raiders conference notes, to which Larry Kasdan nods acknowledgment. Later in the interview there's this exchange: John: Going back to Raiders of the Lost Ark and the story ...


3

This quote was attributed to Bill Finger who died in 1974, he was best known as the uncredited actual creator of Batman


3

This quote does originally come from the film. Harvey coins the phrase (no pun intended) in response to Rachel's comment abot Caesar. He isn't using a common expression, but it does come off quite eloquently. Still it is very similar to the philosophy of Michael Foucault who criticized political and social figures who turn to abusing power for indulgent ...


3

Graphics styles change over the years; while they're popular, they usually refer to some currently popular theme or trope. Right from the 1950s and even up to the 80s & 90s, 'secret spy computers' were "the thing". By this time, the general populace would recognise what a computer green screen looked like - so they tended to be used for anything vaguely ...


2

Although this exact quote may have been first said in the dark knight many men have addressed the philosophy of the corruption of a good man's soul. "He who fights monsters should see to it that he himself does not become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you." -Frederick Nietzsche.


2

It's actually called: "Shock Horror". It has been credited to Dick Walter: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0910011 I stated in a comment that it had been used during wartime (BBC/ABC/NBC) as a danger signal, much as the first couple of bars of Beethoven 5th "(morse code) V for victory" music however this was mistaken.


2

Here's a book from 1945: The pilot was either very brave or very stupid http://books.google.ie/books?id=TvsDAAAAYAAJ&q=%22very+brave+or+very+stupid%22&dq=%22very+brave+or+very+stupid%22&hl=ga&sa=X&ei=9Y68U9bSNoWI7AbZgYHoCQ&redir_esc=y Experiment with Google n-gram viewer to find other/closer versions of the quote.


2

In this particular instance, I do not believe the line spoken by Starlord to the Guardians of the Galaxy at the end of the movie was in reference to anything, it seems, more than anything, to be setting itself up for there being a second Guardian's of the Galaxy movie: What should we do next? Something good? Something bad? A bit of both? Roll Credits ...


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