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293

The 'cab' is hinged round the bottom of the box structure, probably released by Keaton at the appropriate moment, and very likely sprung to assist the demolition. The rest is just balanced on top and will fall at the slightest provocation. You only see it move about 6 feet, so it doesn't have to last long. As I can see no evidence of a rope to pull it [and ...


135

I thought this was going to be a long and difficult investigation... However, the answer was right there on IMDB, in the Trivia section The transformation scene was done in much the same way the beginning part of the transformation was done on Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931). The actress was made up in exaggerated highlights and shadows (including ...


110

Yes, there were some. To name at least one (the earliest I could find proof link about): The Captive (1915) DeMille’s obsession with realism backfired when an extra, Charles Chandler, was shot and killed by a gun used as a prop on set. Later on, Blanche Sweet confessed that DeMille encouraged extras to use real bullets instead of blanks to create more ...


82

The Ames Room, forced perspective, and moving towards the camera. The left side of the room is much larger and farther away than the right side of the room. Take a look at the same illusion here: She is pulled towards the camera in the beginning, and then moves to the right area, which is much smaller than the left area. ...


78

In the 1961 Kurosawa film Throne of Blood, actual archers shot actual arrows at the walls next to the film's main star. Any one of the arrows could have killed or seriously injured him. The process is all described in this short documentary. Also, there is another example with live firearms ammunition in a movie, but it's ...


65

The Yoda in the 1980 Empire Strikes Back and in the 1983 Return of the Jedi was entirely realised using puppetry. Here we see Frank Oz (the chief puppeteer and voice of Yoda for the two movies): And here's a video of the behind the scenes footage: CGI in 1980 and 1983 was in no way capable of rendering anything like Yoda. ...


55

According to the Business Insider article Why 'Star Trek' Has so Much Lens Flare it was all done in-camera and it was all intentional. "There are so many movies from my childhood that had those that when we were shooting 'Star Trek' I remember saying to Dan Mindel, the DP [director of photography], 'It would be so much fun if we' — I didn't think we were ...


52

No, the dog definitely didn't chew a hole in a real fence. Update: Word of God answer from Producer Stuart Cohen and John Carpenter!!! John Carpenter: The fence was made out of edible material. It was not metal. - Director John Carpenter, via private correspondence. Stuart Cohen: The fence was edible - made out of some combination of gelatin ...


51

Lola VFX worked on the body transformation of Chris Evans. From the article How to make a Captain America wimp Lola had three primary approaches to shrinking the 220 pound Evans to the 140 pound guy he needed to be, while maintaining Evans’ performance as closely as possible. Body double / actor doubling for the entire body. The body double was ...


48

"Act of Valor" (2012) featured extensive filmography which included actual bullets being fired as well as active-duty SEALs. per: On Active Duty for the Movies (Real Ammo), The New York Times “We’ve never had a film where the principals were active-duty SEALs,” said Bob Anderson, director of the Navy’s Office of Operations West, in Los Angeles, the ...


45

TL;DR To film the most of action sequences, they designed a 40X60X12 foot corner of the South Tower and it was redressed for the North Tower. They created a model only for the rest of the roofs, the towers, and New York of 1974 and to film Petit’s point of view during his walk. They took some footage from 1400 feet above the ground in a helicopter to get an ...


44

It's not actually glass... Originally, they used a product called "Sugar glass" or "candy glass". Sugar glass (also called candy glass, edible glass, and breakaway glass) is a brittle transparent form of sugar used to simulate glass in movies, photographs and plays. It is much less likely to cause injuries than real glass, and it easily breaks ...


44

I'm not sure how they did it exactly. But I can guess how they probably did it: with 3 kinds of shots. The first kind of shot is entirely CGI: The second kind of shot is actors on a controlled set, running through water, climbing over submerged cars, etc: And the third kind of shot is actors on a controlled set, but with CGI water behind them and ...


43

I always thought it was part of the joke that he's obviously walking on his knees. In the DVD commentary, Mel Brooks talks about how difficult it was playing the Yogurt character. The gold-colored makeup gave him a terrible rash on his face and neck (necessitating the shooting of all of Yogurt's scenes out of sequence), also his knees were hurting ...


36

It's done on computers. Sometimes they also use a prop knife, the kind where the blade pops back in when touched. Some Game of Thrones VFX examples here Of course, older movies didn't have the luxury, so they had to make due with... tricky camera angles, multiple shots, cuts and edits. ...


35

Another common technique is to use a "process trailer", aka an insert trailer or low loader. It is used as a moving camera platform and is towed by a special truck-like vehicle that may contain cameras, booms and or lights. The process trailers are generally very low to the ground to give a realistic perspective of height. They can expand in width to allow ...


35

They use an array of cameras usually kept in curved setup having object in the middle. While every camera captures images from different angles, final shot is produced by editing frames from different cameras. This technique is called Bullettime 360 Photography.


33

A movie production can do another take if it doesn't look good. Typically, a quality TV series or movie spends $100,000s per finished minute in post production cleaning up green screen shots. The commentary in the updated Battlestar Galactica mentioned how one can tell there was money left over on an episode when there is more than a few seconds of the ...


33

I was reading about this recently (yes, it's Cracked.com, but it's well sourced). Not only was this not an uncommon way of getting bullet effects, the crazy didn't stop with guns - The Birth Of A Nation used live cannon. From 6 Terrifying Ways Films Used To Achieve Special Effects, Cracked.com: 6 - Action Films Once Used Real Bullets In today's ...


32

In the 1985 Soviet war film, Come and See, live ammunition was apparently used in some scenes. According to the film's Wikipedia article: The 2006 UK DVD sleeve states that the guns in the film were often loaded with live ammunition as opposed to blanks, for realism. Aleksey Kravchenko mentions in interviews that bullets sometimes passed just 4 inches (...


31

From Wikipedia: First digital animation in a feature film The first feature film to use digital image processing was the 1973 movie Westworld, a science-fiction film written and directed by novelist Michael Crichton, in which humanoid robots live amongst the humans. John Whitney, Jr, and Gary Demos at Information International, Inc. digitally ...


29

Practical Effects are used some of the time. It's cheaper and easier to hide the body and use a fake double, than it is to use CGI or anything else. From Iron Man: Notice the false bottom of the chair, and RDJ's body hidden away. You can see in this pic They first created a prosthetic chest over his real chest and ...


28

Is it a kind of contact lens? Is there more information about this (making-of, documentaries, etc.)? Yes, they used mirrored (light reflecting) contact lenses. From this edited version of Shooting Westworld by Michael Crichton Three problems were especially tricky. One was the robot eyes. I wanted eyes that looked only slightly unreal, not strikingly ...


26

The technique you are talking about with stationary car on set is called Chroma key compositing or chroma keying: is a special effects / post-production technique for compositing (layering) two images or video streams together, used heavily in many fields to remove a background from the subject of a photo or video - particularly the newscasting, motion ...


26

An old impalement illusion used by stage magicians involves wrapping a corset or frame around the body part (such as the neck or torso) which is to be "impaled". The corset contains entry and exit slots on opposite sides of the body part, and an interior pocket or track wrapping around the body through which the sword blade moves. The sword itself is a ...


25

A lot of this will be defining terms. Animation Prior to the advent of computer animation, animation meant taking a bunch of still photos that had slight changes from one photo to the next and then playing those photos back fast enough to create the illusion of smooth motion. When doing animation this way, it's critically important to control every ...


23

The horse-off-the-cliff scene was created with the help of Industrial Light & Magic per this interview with the film's visual effects supervisor. This clip (which I believe was aired during Academy Awards) shows a brief glimpse of how the scene was put together. Essentially, a stunt man rode a motorized mock-up horse over an embankment and jumped off, ...


22

I agree with BlueMoon93 that the illusion of growth is obtained simply by dragging Alice towards the camera (note that her legs and the floor are not visible). However, I think that Ames room was not used. The room could have been perfectly ordinary. Meanwhile, the wall to the right, which Alice got thrown against, did not actually join the ceiling: if you ...


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