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43

This happens more often in series than one-shot movies, and is common in more than just anime. Basically, it's to help the episode stand better on it's own for viewers who are just joining the show, or missed an episode or two earlier, or who have simply forgotten a plot point from an episode two months earlier. This over explaining becomes even more ...


26

Most anime, including Death Note, are adapted from manga (basically the Japanese equivalent of comic books). This leads to a lot of internal narration and recapping for two reasons: Manga, like comic books, are a quite limited medium. In a lot of comic books, particularly older ones, you will see characters internally-monologuing or repeating unnecessary ...


17

I know this is already answered, but I was just going to keep putting up longer and longer comments. Technically the genre defining Harem Anime/Manga is Tenchi Muyo, so I think it deserves a mention. The big distinction in favor of Tenchi Muyo is the romance component. While many earlier works may feature a popular guy who is chased by many women, a harem ...


12

Generally it's because Anime is adapted from another media like Manga, Light Novels or Games. as discussed by Krazer in this answer on Anime and Manga An anime is typically adapted from another source material. Usually it's either a manga, a light novel series (like Haruhi), or even visual novel/computer game (Little Busters!, the When They Cry series). ...


11

An extremely detailed ID question like that deserves a reward. ;) You're looking for Koby-Koby (AKA Little Monsters: The Adventures of Koby & the Oakey Dokeys) from 1995, which is just barely on IMDb. From an online synopsis: Because of a magic spell cast by the King of the Little Creatures, discarded household objects like brooms and cups turn into ...


11

Akira (1988) A secret military project endangers Neo-Tokyo when it turns a biker gang member into a rampaging psychic psychopath that only two teenagers and a group of psychics can stop. Here is a picture of the mess you describe: And a trailer:


10

From your description I'm fairly sure it's UFO Robot Grendizer. I believe it was aired in the US as Grandizer (a instead of e) and was part of the "Force Five" serires. When the bad guys attacked, the hero (farm hand Daisuke) would rush to Grendizer who was hidden inside a cave and jump into the cockpit while transforming into his real identity as the ...


10

To start with, I have never watched a movie with this kind of a plot. But since, you've given a very long and detailed description, overcome by curiosity, I googled for the movie title. After some long browsing, I realized that what you are describing is not a movie at all, but a video game. This plot you've mentioned is exactly similar to the plot of the ...


9

Warning: Spoilers As said before by @JakeM, colors usually tend to have psychological meanings, but I would have to disagree with his meanings. I think its simple to explain most of the meanings. I'll leave other sources with some other information at the end. Light Yagami/Kira - Red His hair and eyes go red. Red is usually associated with Rage, Fierce, ...


9

Sounds like Unico in the Island of Magic The summary on Wikipedia only mentions the block people being used as slaves, but they certainly look like they could be used as the walls in a castle. Otherwise, you still have the evil wizard and the young apprentice working to protect his sister while turning people into blocks.


7

Saber Rider Hey! I did some hunting, and I guess this is the one. The opening repeats a lot the name of the show: Saber Rider. There is your guy with blue cowboy hat, a girl in pink, and a mecha with a Cowboy hat. Check the opening in Youtube. Here is a picture of the team for you: And here is the mecha Ramrod:


6

It is generally thought that Rumiko Takahashi (the best selling female Manga author in history) is the one who started the Harem genre, or at the very least the one who popularized it. Which one of her works can be considered as the first depends on how you define Harem anime. If you define it as one person (any gender) being romantically sought after by the ...


6

I think you're looking for Strait Jacket, (2008). In a world where sorcery and science co-exist, the power of magic comes with a price: Humans who do not take proper precautions are transformed into horrific demons. Those who destroy these demons - and run the highest risk of all - are tactical sorcerists known as Strait Jackets. It was shown ...


5

tl;dr: Anime is expensive, and often made to make the original material more visible. Repetitive vocal exposition is a handy cost-saving technique. I want to expand on F1Krazy's answer a bit. As he says, one likely reason is that they need vocal exposition to pad a show's runtime. But then you could wonder "Why is this not done in Western media?" And sure, ...


4

I believe the term you're looking for is Chibi Chibi (ちび or チビ) is a Japanese slang word meaning "short person" or "small child". Chibi style is usually used in depicting scenes which are cute and/or humorous, and it is extremely rare for it to be used for an entire anime series. It is quite popular in manga, however.


4

Surely, it's Panda and the Magic Serpent, Toei Animation, 1958. The girl turns into a fish, it ends with a storm scene, and, well, the entire thing just happens to be on youtube. From Wikipedia: Panda and the Magic Serpent (白蛇伝 Hakujaden?), also known as The Tale of the White Serpent, is the first color anime feature film, ...


4

The movie, if I'm not mistaken, was a Halloween special that aired once and then never again called Kakurenbo aka Kakurenbo: Hide & Seek. A young boy named Hikora enters the ruins of a forbidden city with a group of other children to play "Otokoyo" (a game of hide-and-seek where the players are said to be kidnapped by ghosts and demons) to find ...


3

I'm almost tempted to say it's "Warriors of the Wind", which is a bastardized version of the anime classic Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind. Everything sort of matches your description, though I'm having trouble with the Tabasco ice cream. In the original Japanese version there was a scene where Nausicaa and Asbel are eating nuts inside an underground ...


3

Could it be Tranzor Z? (aka Mazinger Z) I know that the villain had a henchman that was 1/2 woman/man split down the middel of his/her face and the robot lived in an underground cave. I realize that it is somewhat different than the things you recalled, but some similarities and aired in the US during the correct time period. Some pics here to jog your ...


3

It could be Kyoro chan! Wikipedia page Opening credits on youtube


3

Zoids include 2 elephants and a mammoth, all sentient robotic vehicles. There are four anime series and at least one unofficial and recent movie, which isn't mentioned in the Wiki. The big elephant, Elephander, is from 2000 so can't be it: Mammoth is part of the 1983 line:


2

I wouldn't say there is a particular set of characteristics that tie them together. But if I had to point out ONE particular characteristic that is widely used in the anime industry, are the eyes. In many cultures, the eyes were considered the path to the soul, and manga uses that in many levels in their characters. Usually in manga/anime, you can tell ...


2

The word "anime" is an abbreviation of the Japanese loanword "animeeshon" - from the original English, "animation." In Japan, it literally just refers to any animated material. In North America, the term "anime" has been re-borrowed to refer specifically to animation that came from Japan. Therefore, the singular and defining quality that makes a ...


2

Probably color psychology related based off of the characters personalities. Red being chaotic, blue being "good", light-blue is probably more based off of feminism then personality type, yellow being brash, as for purple it means wealthy or aristocratic, which fits for the Yotsuba Group. See http://www.infoplease.com/spot/colors1.html


2

It's about pacing and changing things up every once in a while. It can't always be super intense 100% of the screen time. Such filler episodes also allow us to see the characters from another perspective in a different kind of situation. In case of action-heavy series, seeing the characters relax or go shopping is a great way to add some realism. Basically, ...


1

As far as I know, the origin of the 'meme' is Neal Stephenson's Snow Crash (1992) though you could make strong representations for the online world Second Life (2004) to be a more contemporary origin - in as much as it 'exists', unlike the world of Snow Crash [the Metaverse] which was only ever on paper.


1

Unfortunately, this is just an example of lazy writing. It is much more challenging, and a lot more satisfying for author and reader, to show, rather than tell. It is a lot more fun to leave clues for the reader, or viewer, to find. But this requires a lot of work and practice on the part of the author or scriptwriter. A story that shows you things, instead ...


1

The show was called Silverhawks. It ran from about 1986 to about 1987. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0090520/


1

Ok. It's funny when you bring Avatar:tLA. Because it is western production made in Asia. There are plenty of animations that are financed by western companies but made in Korea (French like to go to the Best Korea for the prices). Korean animators are strongly influenced by Japanese style. Which came mostly from Osama Tezuka Astro-boy. It's aesthetic are ...


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