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11

I think it's understandable that this would be confusing. Hopefully we can get it sorted out here. Exhibitor-Branded Premium Large Formats Regal's RPX is what the industry refers to as a "premium large format" brand. It is intended to provide an assurance that you'll be watching the movie in the largest house, with the biggest screen at the particular ...


10

No, I am sure that did not happen in any version of the film. But I can't do more than offer you my word of having seen it in the cinema twice and never remembering such a scene. Neither is it elaborated to exist in any of the various behind-the-scenes materials that I extensively watched, too. But another reason that adds to being sure this never happened ...


6

I was told the IMAX 70mm 15perf film is simply a regular 70mm film turned sideways. Is this true? Yes, this is true. A film strip is just a ribbon of celluloid with light sensitive chemicals on it. Prior to exposure, the entire ribbon of film has no "frames" - it is just made with perforation holes so that the gears and pins can move it through the camera ...


6

If you really want value for your IMAX experience, you will only go to see films that have been shot using IMAX 70 MM film or the digital equivalent and that project on film, not digitally. Most Hollywood films do not fit all of these components but the popularity of the concept gets butts in seats (at a higher price point) for something they think is higher ...


5

First of all, IMAX is an acronym for "Image MAXimum". And from what I have seen and read, IMAX theaters are only domed for planetariums, which is why they are domes at the Tech Museum and at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center. The purpose for IMAX to even exist is that it has the capacity to record and display images of far greater size and resolution than a ...


4

It has been released in IMAX 3D outside of the US, but not in the US. This is easy to see on the official IMAX site: https://www.imax.com/movies/justice-league In Europe all IMAX screenings are 3D, in the US all IMAX screenings are 2D. Sites like bowtiecinema.com even took down their original IMAX 3D listings for Justice League (http://www.bowtiecinemas.com/...


4

Since the people actually knowing much more about this than me seem largely reluctant to put it into any answer, I'll give it a first try by linking to some external resources that might give some insight into the matter. First of all the movie itself was shot on a mixture of 65mm IMAX film and 35mm film. The official site of the movie gives some further ...


4

See here. Slate did a good breakdown on resolutions. To directly answer your question: IMAX Laser = 4k horizontal resolution, 1.43:1 aspect IMAX Xenon = 2K horizontal resolution, 1.9:1 aspect IMAX 70mm - 16k horizontal resolution, 1.43:1 aspect 70mm NON-IMAX= 12k horizontal resolution, 2.20:1 aspect So the answer is 70mm non-IMAX over non-70mm IMAX ...


3

Domed IMAX theaters are OMNIMAX theaters. Most Imax films aren't Omnimax films, so there's no need for Omnimax theaters. Proper Omnimax films are filmed with a special camera with a fish-eye lens. Projection is done using a similar fish-eye lens, on a domed screen. This makes for a much more immersive experience. Not all Imax films are Omnimax films. In ...


2

Here's a comparison: Red is 16:9 like an HD television. Blue is 1.9:1 like IMAX. Green is 2.39:1 which is what it was filmed at and what the Blu-ray DVD is displayed at. So for 1.9:1 you'd have some small black bars. On a 1920 x 1080 television, the black bars would be roughly 35 pixels on the top and bottom. For 2.39:1, the black bars would be roughly 276 ...


2

Number 3 is the big point. Yes, a full-frame camera and an APS-C camera both take pictures with a high signal-to-noise ratio on a sunny day in good light. That's not when and where most stuff is filmed. A lot of stuff is filmed during the golden hour, the blue hour (or magic hour), and indoors at various times of day. A 70mm piece of film collects much more ...


1

Yes, it has been released in IMAX 3-D. I am pretty sure that you can go to websites like bookmyshow and check the movie timings by clicking at the English-3D and switching it to IMAX-3D.


1

I read David Breashears book High Exposure: An Enduring Passion for Everest and Unforgiving Places which talks quite a bit about the making of Everest (1998) and his path to learning to embrace and ultimately love the IMAX camera. Each reel of blank film stock which goes into the camera is only 60 seconds (or was it 180?) long. That kind of abbreviated ...


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