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48

Christopher Nolan is, quite famously, aghast with 3D; which he perceives to be an industry forced as opposed to audience led technology... basically, its only around as a way for the film industry to make more money. Nolan is a great advocate of Film, and a great critic of the machinations of the film industry that are pushing for 3-D: "The question of 3-...


48

Are 3D glasses needed? Yes. While not as bad as the early days of 3D where viewing without glasses meant red and blue headaches for days, the video will look slightly off. Note that many films have scenes, not the whole film in 3D, so you may still enjoy the experience overall. If so are they provided? Yes. I am not aware of any theater that doesn't ...


45

Christopher Nolan has repeatedly expressed his dislike for 3D based on various reasons: For example in an interview about Inception he expressed that while interesting, 3D isn't too relevant for a movie's effect: DEADLINE: Why didn’t you shoot in 3D which studios like Warner Bros have made a priority? NOLAN: We looked at shooting Inception in 3D and ...


36

They use an array of cameras usually kept in curved setup having object in the middle. While every camera captures images from different angles, final shot is produced by editing frames from different cameras. This technique is called Bullettime 360 Photography.


31

In 3D films, the 3D glasses are the reason for the dimness.Because the 3-D glasses are darkly coated with polarized filter that decode the images and give them depth dim. I've found a good link and let me summarize the stuff from that site. According to the so-called father of 3-D cinema, Lenny Lipton, because it projects two separate pictures, viewers ...


29

James Cameron has been asked this a few times in the past weeks to the release of the movie, and he has said he did not want to change anything about the movie past adding 3D. However, it seems he admits to making a change while interviewing with a British magazine Culture. James Cameron resisted temptation to cut scenes he was no longer happy with when ...


18

The Dark Flaw in 3D's Bright Future: The figure of 16 foot-lamberts is the standard established by the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers for a projector with no film in it. If you add a 2D film to a projector that meets the brightness standard, you’ll generally wind up with about 14 foot-lamberts, considered an appropriate level of ...


16

2D to 3D Video Conversion is the process of transforming the original 2D video to a 3D form, which in almost all cases is stereo, so it is the process of creating imagery for each eye from one 2D image. That is why the transformation is also called 2D to stereo 3D conversion, or stereo conversion. Two approaches to stereo conversion can be loosely ...


15

Note: This is an addendum to Rahul's answer, which is essentially correct. In the Matrix movies, the filmmakers didn't rely exclusively on the still photos from the stationary cameras. To make the shot appear more fluid, they created many computer-generated still frames from angles that would appear to be between the positions of the stationary cameras. ...


11

From Wikipedia, excerpt on 3D films: The first 3D feature film was Nat Deverich's 5-reel melodrama Power of Love (US '22), starring Terry O'Neil and Barbara Bedford. It premiered at the Ambassador Hotel Theater, Los Angeles, on September 27, 1922.


11

From the Disney Blu-ray 3D help site: When you're watching a 3D/2D compatible disc in 2D, you are actually watching a single eye view of your film (i.e. the left eye or right eye only). I would imagine this is the method used in theaters as modern 3D films are digital projections and thus can be altered accordingly - so Christian was on the right track.


10

There is a huge difference in the feeling of the film based upon the Frames Per Second it was shot in. There are a number of films that were shot using a digital camera, but at a higher 30FPS that were reviewed to have a "poor quality or feel" because the faster shutter rate gave it a television feeling. Many professional digital camera now shoot at the ...


10

I expect the music video is using a different technique than The Matrix. The bullet time sequences in The Matrix are shot using an array of cameras placed around the actor. I think the most likely way the effect in the music video was created, is to get the actors to stay still while the camera moves around them. 3D assets can then be placed into the scene ...


9

There are multiple effects being referenced here. CSI season 10 opener did a variation of the freeze frame effect, which in that case was a combination of various methods: http://nypost.com/2009/10/01/csi-freeze-frame A video of the scene: There is the matrix bullet time effect. The actor was suspended from wires and ...


9

Shooting in 3D costs are said to be 2-4 times that of 2D costs. Mind you, that is the costs of shooting the film, not the whole budget. It's mainly because you have twice the amount of data: for every frame you'll have to do everything twice, once for each eye. Furthermore, the whole filming workflow must be updated. You have bigger, more expensive cameras, ...


9

If they are provided would a better experience be had, by purchasing 3D glasses? I wouldn't bother. There is no one pair of glasses you can buy that just "does 3D". There are many different ways to display 3D, all of which would use slightly different glasses. So basically, if I was hardcore enough to want to do this, I'd have to check every movie ...


8

There doesn't appear to be any official rating system, disappointingly. As a previous user @Pubby answered, what you are referring to is the "depth" of the film (as per Wikipedia): Depth perception is the visual ability to perceive the world in three dimensions (3D) and the distance of an object. A few websites have had users try and champion a ratings ...


7

Glasses are required, but are provided. I don't think buying your own will be worth it—the technology could change over time and may be different between theaters. Many movies are provided in 3D, but not all scenes from a movie are shot in 3D. Some CGI effects are slightly different between versions. This usually does not make a difference and the ...


7

Theoretically, yes, but in practice it's more complicated than that. First of all, we are going to only talk about passive 3D. That's where the glasses you wear to watch it have no electronics or connection to the TV. In order to make passive 3D work, the information for one eye is displayed on the odd lines of the TV and the information for the other eye ...


6

One thing that hasn't been mentioned here yet is that Nolan is also unhappy with the technical limitations of existing technology, namely that 3D movies are significantly darker: “On a technical level, it’s fascinating,”, “but on an experiential level, I find the dimness of the image extremely alienating.” The 3D process, Nolan said, makes “a ...


6

While I work for a US theater, I honestly want to say this is simply your local theater and/or theater chain doing this, and not necessarily the studios themselves, however I have no real basis for this other than my own observations. Here in the US, both the studio and theater work out agreements as to how many prints/copies the theater will buy, and how ...


6

Quoting Peter Jackson: ...it's like watching a movie where the flicker and the strobing and the motion blur what we've been used to seeing all of our lives -- I mean, all our lives in the cinema -- suddenly that just disappears. It goes. And you've got this incredibly vivid, realistic looking image. And you've got sharpness because there's no motion ...


6

3D movies are normally filmed using two slightly offset cameras. Both images are projected onto the viewing screen, with those plastic glasses feeding one image into your left eye and the other into your right. When a film was not shot using two offset cameras, the conversion involves manual identification of different depths in the shot, as summarized in ...


4

The term would be depth (or rather, the illusion of depth), although I haven't seen any actual ratings of it. Films that really seem to pop are generally filmed in 3D and then enhanced post-production when adding in special effects.


4

It has been released in IMAX 3D outside of the US, but not in the US. This is easy to see on the official IMAX site: https://www.imax.com/movies/justice-league In Europe all IMAX screenings are 3D, in the US all IMAX screenings are 2D. Sites like bowtiecinema.com even took down their original IMAX 3D listings for Justice League (http://www.bowtiecinemas....


3

I spoke with my local theatre manager and it is indeed a requirement from the studios/distributors that certain movies must be shown in 3D only, for the first week, to capitalize on the extra revenue. It was also mentioned that this summer has had more 3D movies than past summer so it's been a noticeable trend and has been met with many complaints.


3

He re-rendered the stars in the sky over the sinking ship to make them accurate. http://news.discovery.com/space/neil-degrasse-tyson-tightens-titanic-accuracy-120402.html (and widely reported elsewhere).


3

You should be aware that while most people enjoy 3d movies, a significant minority either can't see the 3d effect, or have an adverse reaction to it. Statistics vary, but about 10% of the population is stereo blind and as many as 1 in 4 report eyestrain, headaches, or motion sickness. A recent study suggests that only a third of people have no problems at ...


2

In addition to the updated starfield, the 3D version of Titanic was opened up to 16:9 from the original 2.35:1 aspect ratio (at least for the Blu-ray disc; I'm not sure if the same was true for its theatrical release). Additionally, stray strands of hair were removed, presumably to make it easier to separate characters from the background as part of the 3D ...


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