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48

Christopher Nolan is, quite famously, aghast with 3D; which he perceives to be an industry forced as opposed to audience led technology... basically, its only around as a way for the film industry to make more money. Nolan is a great advocate of Film, and a great critic of the machinations of the film industry that are pushing for 3-D: "The question of 3-...


47

Are 3D glasses needed? Yes. While not as bad as the early days of 3D where viewing without glasses meant red and blue headaches for days, the video will look slightly off. Note that many films have scenes, not the whole film in 3D, so you may still enjoy the experience overall. If so are they provided? Yes. I am not aware of any theater that doesn't ...


45

Christopher Nolan has repeatedly expressed his dislike for 3D based on various reasons: For example in an interview about Inception he expressed that while interesting, 3D isn't too relevant for a movie's effect: DEADLINE: Why didn’t you shoot in 3D which studios like Warner Bros have made a priority? NOLAN: We looked at shooting Inception in 3D and ...


35

They use an array of cameras usually kept in curved setup having object in the middle. While every camera captures images from different angles, final shot is produced by editing frames from different cameras. This technique is called Bullettime 360 Photography.


15

Note: This is an addendum to Rahul's answer, which is essentially correct. In the Matrix movies, the filmmakers didn't rely exclusively on the still photos from the stationary cameras. To make the shot appear more fluid, they created many computer-generated still frames from angles that would appear to be between the positions of the stationary cameras. ...


11

From Wikipedia, excerpt on 3D films: The first 3D feature film was Nat Deverich's 5-reel melodrama Power of Love (US '22), starring Terry O'Neil and Barbara Bedford. It premiered at the Ambassador Hotel Theater, Los Angeles, on September 27, 1922.


10

There is a huge difference in the feeling of the film based upon the Frames Per Second it was shot in. There are a number of films that were shot using a digital camera, but at a higher 30FPS that were reviewed to have a "poor quality or feel" because the faster shutter rate gave it a television feeling. Many professional digital camera now shoot at the ...


10

I expect the music video is using a different technique than The Matrix. The bullet time sequences in The Matrix are shot using an array of cameras placed around the actor. I think the most likely way the effect in the music video was created, is to get the actors to stay still while the camera moves around them. 3D assets can then be placed into the scene ...


9

There are multiple effects being referenced here. CSI season 10 opener did a variation of the freeze frame effect, which in that case was a combination of various methods: http://nypost.com/2009/10/01/csi-freeze-frame A video of the scene: There is the matrix bullet time effect. The actor was suspended from wires and ...


9

If they are provided would a better experience be had, by purchasing 3D glasses? I wouldn't bother. There is no one pair of glasses you can buy that just "does 3D". There are many different ways to display 3D, all of which would use slightly different glasses. So basically, if I was hardcore enough to want to do this, I'd have to check every movie ...


9

Shooting in 3D costs are said to be 2-4 times that of 2D costs. Mind you, that is the costs of shooting the film, not the whole budget. It's mainly because you have twice the amount of data: for every frame you'll have to do everything twice, once for each eye. Furthermore, the whole filming workflow must be updated. You have bigger, more expensive cameras, ...


8

There doesn't appear to be any official rating system, disappointingly. As a previous user @Pubby answered, what you are referring to is the "depth" of the film (as per Wikipedia): Depth perception is the visual ability to perceive the world in three dimensions (3D) and the distance of an object. A few websites have had users try and champion a ratings ...


7

Theoretically, yes, but in practice it's more complicated than that. First of all, we are going to only talk about passive 3D. That's where the glasses you wear to watch it have no electronics or connection to the TV. In order to make passive 3D work, the information for one eye is displayed on the odd lines of the TV and the information for the other eye ...


7

Glasses are required, but are provided. I don't think buying your own will be worth it—the technology could change over time and may be different between theaters. Many movies are provided in 3D, but not all scenes from a movie are shot in 3D. Some CGI effects are slightly different between versions. This usually does not make a difference and the ...


6

One thing that hasn't been mentioned here yet is that Nolan is also unhappy with the technical limitations of existing technology, namely that 3D movies are significantly darker: “On a technical level, it’s fascinating,”, “but on an experiential level, I find the dimness of the image extremely alienating.” The 3D process, Nolan said, makes “a ...


6

Quoting Peter Jackson: ...it's like watching a movie where the flicker and the strobing and the motion blur what we've been used to seeing all of our lives -- I mean, all our lives in the cinema -- suddenly that just disappears. It goes. And you've got this incredibly vivid, realistic looking image. And you've got sharpness because there's no motion blur, ...


6

While I work for a US theater, I honestly want to say this is simply your local theater and/or theater chain doing this, and not necessarily the studios themselves, however I have no real basis for this other than my own observations. Here in the US, both the studio and theater work out agreements as to how many prints/copies the theater will buy, and how ...


4

In addition to the updated starfield, the 3D version of Titanic was opened up to 16:9 from the original 2.35:1 aspect ratio (at least for the Blu-ray disc; I'm not sure if the same was true for its theatrical release). Additionally, stray strands of hair were removed, presumably to make it easier to separate characters from the background as part of the 3D ...


4

It has been released in IMAX 3D outside of the US, but not in the US. This is easy to see on the official IMAX site: https://www.imax.com/movies/justice-league In Europe all IMAX screenings are 3D, in the US all IMAX screenings are 2D. Sites like bowtiecinema.com even took down their original IMAX 3D listings for Justice League (http://www.bowtiecinemas.com/...


3

You should be aware that while most people enjoy 3d movies, a significant minority either can't see the 3d effect, or have an adverse reaction to it. Statistics vary, but about 10% of the population is stereo blind and as many as 1 in 4 report eyestrain, headaches, or motion sickness. A recent study suggests that only a third of people have no problems at ...


3

I spoke with my local theatre manager and it is indeed a requirement from the studios/distributors that certain movies must be shown in 3D only, for the first week, to capitalize on the extra revenue. It was also mentioned that this summer has had more 3D movies than past summer so it's been a noticeable trend and has been met with many complaints.


2

Major S, I would suggest that the focal point in any given shot is not determined by the editor, but by the director of photography and the director. In many instances the DP works in conjunction with the gaffer to light the scene so that the focal point (be it a character or object) is highlighted in accordance to the director's wishes. This set-up ...


2

There are two key issues with higher frame rates. One is simply that more information can be transmitted at higher frame rates (if the recording was done at the higher rate: just showing the same frame twice as some TVs do doesn't really make much difference). The second is supposed to be that double rate overcomes a major limitation of 3D which is a loss of ...


2

If you have a vision impairment, you're gonna have a bad time. The magic in 3D cinema technology relies on relatively good vision in both eyes. If you have poor vision in even just one eye, you will barely, if at all, see any 3D effects and walk out of the film with a headache. For people who don't know if their vision impairment is going to get in the way ...


1

So I am I clueless, what do I need to know before walking up to the counter and purchasing a ticket to a 3D movie? Other answers already mentioned most of what you need to know, but there is something else you might want to consider. If you're not comfortable wearing glasses (even if you're just slightly uncomfortable) or simply not used to wearing them, ...


1

One other thing to keep in mind with current 3D technology is that it depends on stereoscopic vision—each eye sees a slightly different (flat) image, which your brain then integrates into a single, 3 dimensional image. That might sound obvious, but it means that some folks with particular kinds of vision issues won't be able to see the 3D effect the way it ...


1

Yes, it has been released in IMAX 3-D. I am pretty sure that you can go to websites like bookmyshow and check the movie timings by clicking at the English-3D and switching it to IMAX-3D.


1

Firstly, it's important to note that 3D cinema is unquestionably in decline. Box office takings suggest that 3D ticket sales have been receding since Avatar, which is a consumer behaviour that puts 3D cinema aligned with little more than a fad, an certainly an outgoing trend. Whilst the above link only explores UK box office, this shouldn't be seen as ...


1

Imagine a movie as a flipbook. Higher FPS = more pages in the flipbook. More pages doesn't affect the actual quality of each page, just the motion between the pages.


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