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Apparently 2.00:1 is called "Univisium". 16:9 (1.77:1) is common for TV shows but films tend to have wider aspects - 1.85:1 or 2.35:1. Because they're used for films, they have a "cinematic" feeling. The implication with this 2:1 size is that it will be a compromise that all films and TV shows can use so that we don't have dozens of ...


23

The initial motivation was to compete with television, after that it was more like an arms race The original aspect ratio for film was based on an arbitrary choice in the very early days of cinema based on the standard 35mm film used. The resulted in several decades where 1.33 (4:3) was the standard modified (almost imperceptibly) to the academy ratio of 1....


11

I think it's understandable that this would be confusing. Hopefully we can get it sorted out here. Exhibitor-Branded Premium Large Formats Regal's RPX is what the industry refers to as a "premium large format" brand. It is intended to provide an assurance that you'll be watching the movie in the largest house, with the biggest screen at the particular ...


6

As an anthology series, there are very few connections from episode to episode. Most episodes have unique directors and the show has purposely used different visual styles from episode to episode to create the effect of different worlds. There is the common theme of the dangers of technology, but each episode exists in a different universe (with few ...


5

Osgood Perkins (the movie's director) told the following to Polygon: How did the conversations with your cinematographer, Galo Olivares, go as you were figuring out the look of the film, particularly in the early sequences in the woods? We started thinking of the film as having a prologue and the body of the movie, and we talked about what would be ...


3

According to IMDb, United 93 was released in 2.35:1 ratio. (but shot on 35mm which is typically 4:3 so framed for a wider screen and gives editor/director more choices on what to show later) Assuming you have a normal widescreen TV, the ratio of that is 16:9 or ~ 1.77 to 1 ratio. Blu-rays typically will display on your 16:9 TV Letter-boxed (the black trim ...


3

Perhaps, the producers of these TV shows just wanted to go away from the HDTV look. So did the producers of "Jurassic World", when opting for an aspect ratio of 2:1: Schwartzman, an anamorphic advocate, wanted to shoot the film in 2.40:1, but executive producer Steven Spielberg preferred 1.85:1 because that ratio provided enough headroom for the ...


3

Even since the DVD format and the advent of 16:9 TVs made widescreen films more mainstream, there have been a number of movies that have been reformatted for home video from their original theatrical aspect ratios: The Last Emperor, Apocalypse Now, Avatar, and The Chronicles of Narnia: Voyage of the Dawn Treader come immediately to mind. However, such ...


2

No, you can't. As Tetsujin writes in his comment: Movies are often released in several versions for home or commercial use. Watching 2.39:1 on an airplane's teeny seat-back screen, or on a tablet/phone is not going to be a great experience, whereas you might quite enjoy it on your 60" TV. [...] But... there are several sites on the internet, where you ...


2

So, I think there is an important clarification that needs to be made about aspect ratios and movies. First, home exhibition and the 4:3 aspect ratio never influenced movie production and exhibition. These technologies arrived long after the current (and past) standards had been established. And with that, a bit of history: Background: Film production ...


2

The original theatrical releases are the definitive ones; digital releases in different ratios are common but are not usually what the director intended. The original theatrical releases in cinemas are usually considered as the intended format for the movie. However the original version is recorded and distributed, each scene is (usually) carefully composed ...


2

Your question is difficult to answer. Why? Since it "lumps" all eight films into one "pot" when all of them were filmed over a 10 year period (2001 - 2010/11) by six different cinematographers. Each of these artists in film have their own "choice" camera model & lense aspect ratio preference.(See more below). The question to ask first then is which of ...


2

Number 3 is the big point. Yes, a full-frame camera and an APS-C camera both take pictures with a high signal-to-noise ratio on a sunny day in good light. That's not when and where most stuff is filmed. A lot of stuff is filmed during the golden hour, the blue hour (or magic hour), and indoors at various times of day. A 70mm piece of film collects much more ...


2

4:3 is the "Philo Farnsworth" (the guy who invented/patented the Television set) screen aspect ratio. This aspect ratio was copied over by RCA who mass produced televisions after Farnsworth's patent right expired shortly after WWII, and is primarily based on how many lines of data could be packed and transmitted over the airwaves--for FREE. Sent in either ...


2

Here's a comparison: Red is 16:9 like an HD television. Blue is 1.9:1 like IMAX. Green is 2.39:1 which is what it was filmed at and what the Blu-ray DVD is displayed at. So for 1.9:1 you'd have some small black bars. On a 1920 x 1080 television, the black bars would be roughly 35 pixels on the top and bottom. For 2.39:1, the black bars would be roughly 276 ...


1

35mm film has always had an aspect ratio of approximately 4:3. When widescreen cinematography became popular in the 1950s, it was achieved in a number of different ways. Films with a 1.85:1 aspect ratio are typically shot "flat," with no special lenses, and the top and bottom of the filmed image are simply cropped to produce the final widescreen image. ...


1

You want to see something that will really bake your noodle? The Hitchiker's Guide To The Galaxy was apparently only released in reformatted versions: Why the very different release formats for Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy? Anyway, movies are distributed in various formats, because TVs exist in various formats. Take a look at this article to see ...


1

I read a fascinating blog article at Premium Beat where the writer stated: The very wide aspect of 2.39:1 makes it appealing to so many filmmakers. Just about anything will look more cinematic or more ‘filmic’ when shot in this aspect, considering that originally it was associated with the anamorphic/cinemascope look and we are trained to ...


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