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11

The movie is mostly accurate except the negative villain-like portrayal of NTSB (National Transportation Safety Board). The movie is based on Highest Duty: My Search for What Really Matters. It is a memoir written by Chesley Sullenberger and Jeffrey Zaslow describing the events of US Airways Flight 1549. Of those two, Chesley Sullenberger (Sully) was the ...


10

Because the film is a dramatization of real events, most people (in the U.S., anyway) already know that Sully was successful in landing the plane. The film is designed to show people what they may not know, all of the drama before and after. Showing the plane's successful landing isn't a spoiler because it's a matter of public record. From Wikipedia: ...


7

Jeff Skiles definitely didn't say that in NTSB hearing. Jeff Skiles said that to Captain Sully probably at some other point (as mentioned by the other answer). In fact Jeff Skiles never* spoke in the entire hearing and Captain Sully was the only one who was answering questions. The same is maintained in the movie if I remember correctly. Except for the ...


7

Flight 1549 Captain Chesley Sullenberger spoke with Maggie Rodriguez and Harry Smith about the moments before he landed the airplane safely in the Hudson River, and around the fourth minute he does claim that Skiles uttered that phrase: Though it isn't clear to me whether this happened at the NTSB hearing.


4

I am not a controller, but I know people who are and were -- still not an expert though. But here are my thoughts. It goes without saying that this was a very, very serious incident in ATC circles and many more. As soon as it was determined that an emotional event occurred on the part of the controller, he was immediately replaced. The reason for this is ...


3

In addition to Paulie_D's answer which is logically correct that the subset of people needed to hear it clearly. I am trying to answer the why ? As this was a hearing in procession, people sitting in back might be aviation journalist and they might not be privileged to hear the CVR (Cockpit Voice Recording) at that point during hearing. They however might ...


2

Actually, if you look carefully, it's not the whole room using headsets, just a relatively small subset of people at the tables at the front. The observers at the back are not using headsets. As such there are, it seems to me a couple of possibilities. Firstly, that only this subset needed to hear the recording closely enough to require headsets for ...


2

Here's a comparison: Red is 16:9 like an HD television. Blue is 1.9:1 like IMAX. Green is 2.39:1 which is what it was filmed at and what the Blu-ray DVD is displayed at. So for 1.9:1 you'd have some small black bars. On a 1920 x 1080 television, the black bars would be roughly 35 pixels on the top and bottom. For 2.39:1, the black bars would be roughly 276 ...


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