117

As has been mentioned, the binocular "look" is just a mask. It's also worth noting that if you're looking through binoculars properly you will only see one circle.


53

Similar techniques were used in Birdman which was also visualised as a single shot, and the opening scene of The Revenant. Usually, if you're looking out for them you can see the wipes they use - watch for someone crossing camera in such a way as they completely cover the shot, or in Birdman, they used transitions between rooms, covered by CGI to keep the ...


50

This will be achieved through a series of shots. Let's pretend you want to show a scene where two people are talking in a diner - here is the classic way to go about it. First you shoot an establishing shot of the whole room - your actors can perform the whole scene and it doesn't matter if they mess up, as you will not be using the dialogue from this shot ...


49

The Michael Bay Spin I'm joking, but as far as I can tell the technique doesn't really have a name. All that's happening is that the camera is moving around subjects in the foreground, and the background appears to move quicker thanks to the simple fact that it's further away. The reason I refer to it as the Michael Bay Spin is that director Michael Bay ...


45

The Shining used the then newly-invented device called a Steadicam to shoot these (and many other) scenes: This film was among the first half-dozen to use the newly developed Steadicam (after the 1976 films Bound for Glory, Marathon Man, and Rocky), and was Kubrick's first use of it. This is a stabilizing mount for a motion picture camera, which ...


45

The short answer is: You've picked three of the most talented and, significantly, indulged directors in history (Stanley Kubrick, Terence Malick, Milos Forman) and asked "Why doesn't everyone work this way all the time?" Most filmmakers can't take a year to shoot, and artificial light is more consistent, and can be used in places where there isn't any ...


39

They don't, it's a fixed matte applied in post, these days with a simple 2D mask and some mild edge blurring. I'm reasonably certain nobody ever in the history of film and TV ever used anything optical to do that kind of shot.


39

Interlacing Interlaced video is a technique for doubling the perceived frame rate of a video display without consuming extra bandwidth. The interlaced signal contains two fields of a video frame captured at two different times. TL; DR ...when you pause an interlaced video, it actually shows you two fields at once, each captured at slightly different times....


35

They use an array of cameras usually kept in curved setup having object in the middle. While every camera captures images from different angles, final shot is produced by editing frames from different cameras. This technique is called Bullettime 360 Photography.


31

Quoting from Wikipedia under filming section. Filming was accomplished with long takes and elaborately choreographed moving camera shots to give the effect of one continuous take. Careful editing was employed to trick the viewer’s eye into thinking they were watching films unfolding in one unbroken take. (source) Sam Mendes explained it quite well ...


27

TV Tropes refers to it as an "orbital shot" which somehow seems more appropriate for describing the technique. You can find this technique in Walt Disney's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs when the queen drinks the potion transforming her into the witch - obviously they're not rotating the camera, but the actual painted cel backgrounds themselves, but the ...


23

It's a technique called silver retention, also known as bleach bypass. To quote from Cinematography: Theory and Practice : Imagemaking for Cinematographers and Directors: Deluxe, another film lab with a long history in Hollywood, uses a process called Color Contrast Enhancement (or CCE). CCE raises the contrast, deepens the blacks, and adds grain ...


21

It's called 'negative space' and is often used to convey a sense of isolation - Watch: What's Negative Space Mr Robot does a similar thing, called quadrant framing - The Socially Anxious Framing of 'Mr. Robot' I don't know enough about it to provide a full answer, as I'm not certain precisely what is gained by having the negative space behind the ...


20

It's called Dolly Zoom (but there are a couple of alternate names for it) From MediaCollege: A dolly zoom is a cinematic technique in which the camera moves closer or further from the subject while simultaneously adjusting the zoom angle to keep the subject the same size in the frame. The effect is that the subject appears stationary while the ...


20

This is a technique called Tilt Shift Photography. It can be performed entirely using optical techniques or using software to post process an image. A lens with tilt and shift capabilities allows you to more selectively control which parts of the image are in focus, and the plane of focus. It can be used to make more of the image than normal be in focus, ...


20

I know I teased this as a comment, but the answer really is disappointing… They used CGI to mask the transitions. After comments This doesn't mean it wasn't clever or a lot of hard work by some amazing artists, merely that these days we're quite used to half of humanity vanishing, worlds colliding, or a woman pushing a space ship across galaxies. Mundane ...


19

There's a lot missing with natural light and there's a lot that can't be done if you rely on natural light and most of it relates to being in control of your set. Natural light is great... if you want natural light. It has a warm glow that feels really nice on film. It can't be beat... if that's the look you want. Natural light isn't always what a person ...


17

TLDR: From Iron Man 3 onwards, at least, Illustrator, Cinema 4D and After Effects were used. Long Answer: I can't find too much information about Iron Man 1 or 2, but in Iron Man 3 and beyond what you are referring to is the Heads Up Display, created by 3D designer Jayse Hansen. From his website (which is offline at time of writing, but can be accessed ...


17

You've got it backwards. No effect is being applied to soap operas. It's the tvs that are applying an effect. Let me explain. To fool the human brain into believing that a series of flashes are a continuous, moving image, the flashes have to come at a minimum of between 50-60 Hz (cycles per second). The chemicals available in the early days of motion ...


17

When distributed to the theaters, new digital films will likely be 4K, with better color depth and resolution than home 4K. But theaters will not be able to show at that resolution if they have not upgraded their projectors to the latest capabilities. Also, older movies being shown again will be at a lower resolution than movies released in the last few ...


17

Do you mean in this day and age, or back in the day before we had digital cameras? You can get a tap from the camera these days, but you still can't see what was actually captured to film until it gets back from the lab. In short, you need a DoP[1] who knows film; it's too expensive for amateur guessers. There is a system known as a Video Tap or Video Assist ...


15

It's combination of 3 separate cable cam shots with a lot of CGI crowd duplication work. The FX house was Rodeo FX and they posted YouTube videos of how it was done. In a major sequence inside the Las Vegas MGM Grand, which was more than a minute long, RODEO FX stitched and morphed three different cable cam plates together to form a 720-degree spinning ...


15

Note: This is an addendum to Rahul's answer, which is essentially correct. In the Matrix movies, the filmmakers didn't rely exclusively on the still photos from the stationary cameras. To make the shot appear more fluid, they created many computer-generated still frames from angles that would appear to be between the positions of the stationary cameras. ...


14

One of the reasons is to create a "loop", but this "loop" is probably a different definition of the word than you're thinking. Film comes off the reel smoothly. Film being exposed to light from the lens has to stay stationary while it's being exposed. To accomplish that, the film strip kind of bulges upwards above the lens, then gets yanked suddenly into ...


13

This type of shot is most commonly known as a Deep Focus Shot. From the wiki page: Deep focus is a photographic and cinematographic technique using a large depth of field. Depth of field is the front-to-back range of focus in an image — that is, how much of it appears sharp and clear. Consequently, in deep focus the foreground, middle-ground and background ...


13

Before the video assist that the fine answer from @Tetsujin described, and perhaps even afterwards until all-digital production, you had the Dailies/Rushes where each day's raw film was developed. From Wikipedia: Dailies Dailies, in filmmaking, are the raw, unedited footage shot during the making of a motion picture. They are so called because usually at ...


12

From page 2 of "A Bride Vows Revenge": [Robert] Richardson[, ASC] did design a specifically "textural" look for a sequence in which a wizened monk (Gordon Liu) helps The Bride (Uma Thurman) sharpen her fighting skills. "Quentin wanted to replicate the visual generation loss in these old kung fu films - the scratches, the higher-than-...


12

Should have googled properly before posting the question. As it turns out, the creative decision was actually a workaround to a date problem. Fincher actually wanted to shoot the whole scene in Henley Royal Regatta but it was available for a very limited time. So Fincher decided to shoot the closeups in Eaton on a man made lake which didn’t look anything ...


12

This has so far proven to be a long and not entirely fruitful search. The generic answer to "what lens is it?" is .. it's a wide-angle lens, very wide - a type known as a fish-eye. Precisely which one may have to remain speculation. There appears to be a discrepancy in recollection even amongst people who were there at the time. As to the far broader ...


11

Cross fades and pans are more common in (low budget) television for some reason, and even more common in home video—I have my theories about the causes, but that does not affect this question. View any quality movie and you'll see that almost every cut (99+%) is a classic straight cut. For extra effect, maybe there is a fade to black or fade from ...


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