43

That is a Shoulder rest. This is to help you hold the phone up to your ear by shrugging your shoulder or tilting your head a bit. It made a lot more sense before cell phones.


15

Summary Answer: Idea of America being land of the free and people being allowed to do what they want. Idea of never-ending "game" that everyone on the street must play, regardless of if they like it/want to. Idea of "us" v "them" mentality between the streets (sticking together) and others. Detailed Answer: Firstly, for the ...


14

He's at the bar in the final episode when the Co-op members meet with Vondas to arrange their deal.


12

From the script: Burrell: You want to talk about dirt? Have at it. Talk some shit about your Eastern district days. Talk about what was going on back when you was running wild in the DEU. Daniels: That's just talk. Burrell: Just talk? FBI field reports. You came into a lot of money, quick.... Daniels: You wanna put my shit in the street? Feel free. ...


9

I really liked Sydnor, so perhaps I am a bit biased. David Simon confirmed that Sydnor represented the few hardworking, talented, and dedicated members of the force. He was an actual good guy, and in ordinary circumstances (i.e. without a self-involved, glory seeking, corrupt group of individuals more concerned about their own career progression who keep the ...


7

Sydnor, as you see in the final episode, turns into McNulty. Sydnor was meant to be seen as Jimmy McNulty. Remember the final episode showed the "origin". Michael - The new Omar Dukwon - The new Bubbles Sydnor - The new McNulty Carver - Any middle management (Burell etc...) Kima - the new Daniels (I'm not totally sure about this, but that's how I see it)


7

That quote doesn't show that it was common knowledge that Bubbles was Greggs' snitch; it shows that Omar knows Bubbles is a snitch. At other times, Omar has been shown to have knowledge other characters don't, and this is likely the same. If it was common knowledge that Bubbs was snitching, the guys at the towers would never have let him do his thing with ...


6

The picture is of Robert Isray, an American football team owner who controversially moved the Baltimore Colts to Indianapolis in 1984, and appears to be an allegory of the situation Frank is now facing at the docks with regards to the displacement of industry. The picture looks to be one taken by the Baltimore Sun as he clashed with reporters following the ...


6

During the "Fuck" scene, Bunk and McNulty understood how the crime happened, especially that the woman was bending over while looking at the window (the bullet entered high in the chest and came out low from the back, at 3:18 in the video). Something had to attract her attention, from the outside, for her being positioned that way. They deduced it was ...


6

"Oh, and that other thing, them two hitters you asked after, they good with it" - Shamrock He's not referring to hitters for Avon. You're correct that Stringer was selling out Avon (to clarify, I don't believe Stringer actually technically sold information to Bunny, just rats Avon out instead). Earlier, Stringer wants Slim Charles to assassinate Clay ...


5

Nothing happens to the Greek or to Vondas, which exemplifies one of the major themes of the series: True change is impossible to enact. You can replace the moving parts or force them to hide for a while, but the game is always the game.


5

Old analog phones & pagers had a kind of "MAC address" that would identify them. They didn't change after every connection like they do these days, they were fixed for the life of the device. It was a pretty simple job to give 2 devices the same 'address'. I had my carphone cloned to my mobile (illegal-ish but I used it fairly:) The network would ...


4

I know from listening to the Breaking Bad Insider Podcast that Vince Gilligan often states Sopranos, Goodfellas, Godfather and spaghetti westerns, Once Upon a Time in the West is particularly mentioned in this interview. Gilligan has been inspired by numerous shows and movies. I can't rattle them all off but I know having listened to the podcast that he will ...


4

This has been bugging me like crazy lately. The only explanation I can think of is they need proof that the specific calls they want to wiretap are between two suspects before they can get permission to record. Without understanding the code the calls may as well be between random people, and they wouldn't have good enough legal grounds to record. With the ...


3

The question regarding the fate of the children is not answered anywhere in the series (or in it's companion piece, 'The Wire - Truth Be Told' written by Rafael Alvarez), but looking at other plot lines, specifically Randy's story from season 4, it is likely that they were taken into statutory social care.


3

These buildings are frequently referred to as 'derelicts', especially in Season 4 when Chris and Snoop find a use for them. You might live in one if you had no other choice but you'd have to break in if you didn't own it as the previous owners would have boarded it up. It wouldn't be especially habitable as they are generally falling down and disconnected ...


2

That location appears to be Hamsterdam from season 3. Apparently they are vacant houses. This link says they have since been torn down but when I do google street view I still see them there (still in rough shape/abandoned by the look at some of those buildings). My googling hasn't shown much but maybe this can help you or somebody find more information on ...


2

I think Sydnor is, in a way, supposed to represent the viewer. Over the course of five seasons, we learn nothing about his past, his personal life, or his ambitions. He is both figuratively and often times literally a passenger in the vehicle driven by Lester, McNulty and the rest of the police crew, just as we, the audience, are. What's interesting is ...


2

I got two things out of this scene: Shit doesn't change. Gambling with other's trust usually leads to consequences without reward. McNulty's death as a cop and constantly gambling with his career. Cheese gambling trust and ending up betraying the community as a whole. Stringer crossing Avon constantly during the end of his reign. Gambling with other's ...


2

Although there is some interest in 'following the money' and nailing corrupt politicians etc they are not 'the target' or any kind of priority for the detail. Its not just a case of the 'Barksdale Crew' getting more lenient sentences - if the detail were to turn the case over to the FBI it is more than likely that the original targets would be offered ...


2

Season 5 Episode 4; Burrell talking to Nerese about Daniels when Burrell realises his job is under threat by getting replaced by Daniels: Burrell: He's not the spick and span boy they think he is. He came up in the Eastern District, part of a bad drug unit skimming seized drug money. I actually had the Feds... Nerese: [interrupts] This isn't about ...


1

It's a storytelling technique to leave questions opened and details blurred. Sometimes it's just an story opener like rosebud in Citizen Kane or the briefcase in Pulp Fiction and sometimes it's a fuzzy detail of the background story of a character like the relationship of Walter White and Gretchen Schwartz in Breaking Bad or if Mr. Pink in Reservoir Dogs ...


1

Another interpretation I always got of this, and it's similar to the "this is America, land of the free, and you can do whatever you want" approach. This is also America, where you are innocent until proven guilty. I.e., Snotboogie always "commits the crime" of stealing the money from the craps game. And every week he gets his punishment of getting his ass ...


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