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58

They're actually just glorified 'lick & stick' - thin 'not quite plastic' decals adhered to paper backings, which are wetted with a mixture of water and alcohol and applied to the skin. I imagine they're very similar to the ones you can find on the cosmetics counter in some chemist's (though I've never used those, so that's a guess). They will start to ...


26

Kevin Spacey had a cyst that was removed after it grew to painful proportions. This is outlined in the book by Robin Tamblyn, "Looking Closer" which is a biography of him. Here is the quote from the book: Spacey does have at least three genuine scars, however. The crease above the lid of his left eye is the legacy of a childhood altercation with a cat ...


20

Tattoos are a key plot element of the NBC series Blindspot. The application process takes anywhere from 45 minutes (for just the hands and neck) to multiple1 hours (and three artists) for the full-body treatment. They're applied in sheets and released with water, like common mass-market temporary tattoos. The ones used in Blindspot are significantly more ...


20

To be honest with you, the best answer to this question is the adage that beauty is in the eye of the beholder. There are a plethora of reasons why actors looked so drastically different back then, some of them social, some of them technical, but to assert that they were any less handsome is a misnomer. Popular culture of the 1950's (and also but a little ...


20

CGI was actually fairly common practice by the 1990s, a watershed period for digital visual effects. Most prominently rendered in wireframe in the 1970s (Star Wars IV, 1977; Superman, 1978), by the mid-80s various scifi and fantasy films employed photoreal mapping effects (Flight of the Navigator, 1986) and were making strides in live action/digital ...


14

According to Den Of Geek - Top SFX shots: The nails are rotoscoped to provide an area for an animated colour transition to take place, and that's all there is to it. Rotoscoping refers to the technique of manually creating a matte for an element on a live-action plate so it may be composited over another background Some other examples of "painting" ...


14

(Not saying this is how it was really done - my background is in stage, not screen). There are three effects going on there - the spray of blood from the whip, the (very brief) scene where you see the whip striking the actresses back, and the closeup of the wounds afterward. In reverse order: the closeup is basic prosthetics well within the abilities of a ...


13

Sort answer: It was a mix of make-up and CGI. Long answer: For Two-Face, Nolan decided to break new ground. "This character was one of our major vfx challenges," recalls overall Visual Effects Supervisor Nick Davis. "Chris was not interested in going the traditional make-up route. He felt that it would be an additive effect, rather than the ...


10

Extensive CGI isn't necessary. For the arms, it's simple enough to have them wear green/blue socks. Here is a picture of Lt. Dan from Forrest Gump: Basically, they shoot this scene twice, once with the actor and another with them missing. A computer looks for blue (green is used more often I think) pixels, and replaces those with the corresponding pixels ...


10

It was a large chest plate An interview with Lycia Naff describes the process: All three mammary glands are fake. In fact, the prosthetic is a large chest plate that starts at the neck and goes down to my belly button. This huge piece is applied using spirit gum on the very thin ends of this porous, spongy piece. It took between five and eight hours to ...


9

Speaking from a theatrical background, stage-work, I will honestly say it's a combination. The actor/actress being made up affects this. Do they have smooth skin or wrinkled, do they have a tendency to look younger/older than they are to start with? I find it's easier to make a younger person look older because it's a case of addition over reduction. To ...


9

Was this purely a television phenomenon Apparently, yes. This was due to the way lower resolution of TV cameras compared to movie film... Commercial television came to America during the 1940s and 1950s but, as in Europe, there were test transmissions in the 1930s. These early tests demonstrated that conventional make-up techniques were not suitable for ...


8

TL;DR According to Guinness, the record is 20 hours for the temporary tattoos on Rod Steiger's entire body in the film The Illustrated Man, but there are many honorable mentions that came close. Full Answer In the 1969 movie The Illustrated Man, Rod Steiger plays a man whose entire body is covered in tattoos, each telling a story. The many intricate ...


8

I couldn't tell you the exact technique they would have used, but I assume they just had an effect artist colour it in post-production. For the record, CGI was being used in film to varying degrees all throughout the 1980s, though they have said that one of the only CG shots in Total Recall was for the x-ray scanner scene.


7

The easiest way to achieve that is to use an amputee. And yes, zombie-type movies use a lot of amputees as extras. It's just easier and cheaper than green-screening something like that. Attach a prosthetic, and they can hobble, crawl, get their legs bitten off, whatever you want with a little practical special effects. If it was a main character played ...


6

BuzzFeed has an article that describes the process as a mix of practical effects and CGI. Logistically, it was a matter of some old-school camera trickery — the whip never came close to Nyong'o's back, but it looked like it did thanks to the camera angles director Steve McQueen chose for the scene, and Nyong'o moving her body as if she was being whipped....


6

All practical effects. The actor's skin was layered with blue latex paint. Dried Latex, unlike powdered or liquid based makeup will not smudge or run with sweat. Latex paint dries into a flexible rubber membrane (think balloon) that will follow the skin. This allows movement without the paint rubbing off. You have to pull or rub vigorously to get it off ...


6

It's usually a combination of liquid latex, fake blood and some other materials. Special Effects guru Tom Savini once used real pig intestines, but apparently the stench was so offensive he had to re-think his strategy. I've seen this description on a few sites: Lay out multiple layers of liquid latex on a flat surface, like a glass or marble ...


6

Usually for something like this, they use Silicone appliances, that are painted. (Rarely) hard plastic pieces, that are placed on an actors body, are used. Some ways to get that chrome looks are: vacuum Metalising silver spray painting (yes they really do it) or Alumaluster (http://www.imperialsurfacetechnologies.com/ist-alumaluster.html) One has to keep ...


6

There is an interview with Lycia Naff, the actor that played Mary ("the triple-breasted hooker from Mars!"¹) where the subtext does indicate that it was a full prosthetic. ...But still, I felt really exposed. It didn’t hit me until the first moment where the scene called for me to expose myself, because what came over me was such shame. Which was weird, ...


5

The trivia section of IMDB's entry for Cape Fear states that for his role in that movie Robert De Niro was tattooed with vegetable dyes, which fade after a few months.


5

A number of techniques were involved for the portrayal of a normal man as a dwarf on the screen. For some shots the actor folded hi legs from feet to knees. For some static scenes his legs were hidden inside a trench. Special shoes had to be used when the character was shown walking. The movie's director has explained it all here.


4

It's not imagining. You are probably right that in current films actor appear younger than their real age but in older film they look same to their age or might be older. Some of my friend told me that in 3 Idiots, the face wrinkles of the leading actor (Aamir Khan) is removed digitally in the film, so that he can look like a college aged boy. So now days ...


4

I'm not sure how capable or widely used CGI was for such stuff back then. Here is a compiled list of movies around and before 90s' using FX and CGI. This list does not have The Shadow so definitely use of CGI can be ruled out and diretor Russell Mulcahy mentioned using FX. Mulcahy said, “There are a lot of FX in this film, but it’s not a FX film. It’s ...


4

Most probably makeup, for how to achieve it refer, Wikihow : There are plenty of makeup tricks to give you the gorgeous tan you've been looking for, many of which are easy to do. Using makeup is the safest, but also most temporary, way to darken your skin. One great method is using bronzers and shimmer powders. You'll need a few simple products to create ...


4

My guess is that Jane himself is driving his character's look, possibly as a fan of the artists I mentioned, facilitated by wardrobe and makeup people with an appreciation of that aesthetic. As far as I'm aware, there is no proof of that. However, there is a tiny bit of supporting evidence that Joe Miller (the character played by Jane) drives his own ...


3

Rebecca Romijn as Mystique - Nine Hours (X-Men Movies) In an interview with Fox News Rebecca Romijn says: "Not that Jennifer Lawrence didn't do a great job, she's phenomenal. I love sharing that role with that girl. She's as cool as they come. But I do think nine hours of makeup makes you the villain you need to be to be Mystique," Romijn said.


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