Hot answers tagged

59

This is actually fairly common in close-up dialogue scenes and interviews. Even if more than one camera is available it may not be possible to get the angle you want without the second camera being in shot. The way it is done is that each scene is shot twice (at least) each time from a different angle usually with both actors delivering their full dialog. ...


53

Caveat: Janitor says paycheck and paid much more. He does not say paid more per hour. Both are likely salaried and the p/h below is for comparison of their biweekly paycheck. Consider that Sacred Heart is a Teaching Hospital, and JD is a resident at the time, a non-licensed medical student whom the hospital is basically investing in. He's not paid a regular ...


30

Very simply - don't use real glass. Movies have long used sugar glass. Literally, a substance that looks like glass but is just made from sugar & water, heated until it turns into a kind of hard, clear toffee [that's 'candy' for those of you born the wrong side of the Atlantic :P]. The same thing is used for the clichéd 'bottle over the head' in fight ...


19

As far as I remember Ben died during the episode. Someone said that he always carries his camera with him and he wouldn't go anywhere without it. At some point in the episode you can start seeing him without the camera - I would say that's the sign of him beeing dead.


17

There are also commercial silicone and urathane (plastic) products that can be molded into clear glass-looking sheets. Add in a sound effect and you're done.


14

Three patients dying would certainly trigger a hearing at the very least, and based on the families, lawsuits. But that is what Malpractice insurance is for, and medical waivers, and any number of procedures in the hospital for how the donor would be tested prior to the transplants. If they crossed their Ts and doted their Is, there would be no reason for ...


14

Yes. Scrubs' depiction of medical training was very accurate. According to Ryan Bich Tran from Quora who is an Internist at Tri-Valley Internal Medicine, even though Scrubs was a zany comedy its depiction of medical training was very realistic. Borrowing from his answer on Quora As much as I disliked ER and Grey's Anatomy for being unrealistic I ...


13

There are several reasons why pagers are still being used by medical professionals in a hospital setting. I am a nurse working in a hospital setting and although there have been discussions about moving to smartphones, pagers are still the preferred form of communication. Pagers offer several advantages over smartphones: Information must be able to be ...


13

AFAIK, he died while Dr. Cox was out (I think he was to pay bail for the clown for his son's birthday party). JD hears being assigned to perform the tests, to which he protests that he is already overworked. So at that point Ben is alive. When Dr. Cox returns to the hospital, JD's attitude is extremely sad and defensive, to the point of introducing the ...


13

From Wikipedia: The role of Janitor was originally devised as a one-time gag in the series' pilot episode, Lawrence admitted: "When we watched the pilot, we knew instantly we had to keep this guy around." so he wasn't even meant to be on the whole first season. In season two he is also shown in the extended opening video credit. But that had to return ...


9

There's no canonical answer to this that I'm aware of but if you don't mind a bit of speculation.. In-Universe - It's established that Dr. Kelso is bad at remembering the names of the hospital staff (because he doesn't care about them) and he could simply have gotten the name wrong (and the job as well - Dr Carlson is mentioned as being a Pediatrician ...


9

Pager technology has always allowed arbitrary alphanumeric (A-Z, a-z, 0-9, some special characters) messages of various lengths. How they are used depends on the person or company using them. Typically, short medical codes can be used, to indicate a longer or complicated situation, but proper length messages can be sent as well. Pagers can scroll messages ...


8

Just watched this episode. When J.D. tells Dr. Cox about the "heart patient" dying, he says "HE went into cardiac arrest." He never says the patient's name, and like SJuan pointed out, J.D. seems way more upset than you would expect from a random patient dying. Also, just before J.D. appears, Cox is talking to Ted, with Ben nowhere in sight. When J.D. tells ...


6

Simply put none of the OCD-induced behaviors he displays would have a negative impact on his ability to do surgery (and FWIW the portrayal of Kevin Casey and his condition was one of the most realistic depictions of OCD I've ever seen on screen so as someone with mild OCD I have a lot of respect for Scrubs purely for that!) While seemingly every aspect of ...


6

Alright found it. So Bill Lawrence himself commented on Twitter that they never thought it up and was left for viewers' imaginations.


6

"My Half-Acre" (Season 5, Episode 9) . .D. meets the klutzy Julie, and when he becomes smitten, Elliot attempts to help out with romance advice; Carla tries to find Cox's soft side when he refuses to kiss his son; Turk and Janitor put together an air band to win a contest, but Kelso gives them a tremendous obstacle. Here it is:


4

I would like to add a little detail that most people don't see when watching scrubs. By that I mean the little details. I already watched "lazy directed" medical tv schows. In these sometimes or even everytime doctors wear rings on their fingers or watches in the ER. This makes no sense because in the real world doctors and all the personal have to put ...


3

I watched the episode several times. I think the writers left it a little open to interpretation. I agree that Ben walking around with his camera and then not with his camera may have been the point where he dies. I believe the heart attack patient was a diversion really it was Ben and Dr. Cox needed someone to blame because he felt guilty that he lost his ...


3

I know this is a little late, but here is what is shown in a pager in S1E9 of House. MSG RECEIVED... CODE BLUE: JOHN HENRY GILES - RM. 324


3

Its implied that Ben died halfway through the episode. After Dr. Cox comes back, he is the only one that Ben interacts with. Plus Ben is no longer wearing his camera, "Ben is never seen without his camera" For someone who usually reacts indifferently to patients dying (especially when its not his fault) it doesn't make sense for him to react so emotionally ...


2

JD got a code while he was standing in the window to get prescription medicine, that was not the old guy in the wheelchair. It was Ben during him getting his tests, that's when Ben died. After Dr. Cox came back from bailing the clown from jail JD presented Ben's chart to him, that's when Dr. Cox starting hallucinating Ben without the camera. In case you ...


2

No. It was never spoken on screen. All we know is that Elliot was really disgusted by it. And Jake likely knew it was something to be ashamed of based on his reaction too. But the truth is that had they told us, it probably wouldn't live up to the reaction. The mystery is part of the joke. Nothing the writers could come up with would be as shocking as ...


1

There's a few potential meanings here. First of all, the CALL-TUR might have been aimed at political pundit and former litigator Ann Coulter, who had just released her first book; a New York Times best seller called High Crimes and Misdemeanors: The Case Against Bill Clinton when this episode aired. Second, CAL-TURK was likely a play on the famous ...


1

It is never discussed again or revealed within the continuity of the show. There are several spots on the internet (sorry, no links, they all seem to use NSFW language) where people share theories. My own feeling is it was something most people would consider pretty vanilla or maybe a mild kink, but Elliot's repression and her hidden (lack of) feelings ...


1

I agree JD says "20 minutes after you left he went into cardiac arrest" and Dr. Cox becomes emotionally distressed. Later on when Dr. Cox takes all of JD's patients, the former pt. with heart problems is on the bed - making it clear it's Ben who has died. And of course Dr. Cox insisting JD screwed up.


1

Ben didn't have the camera when JD told Dr Cox about him not making it. At that point Ben was dead. We see late that the "heart" patient was in a bed when Dr Cox took all of JD's patients. When Ben was missing his camera was also when no one else noticed Ben, furthering the theory that Ben was the one who died from cardiac arrest


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