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36

Judging from House's character as exhibited throughout the series, I think the conclusion you draw from that quote is rather the other way around. If we know anything about House, he's extremely rational (or thinks to be) in his approach to problems, very unsympathetic of those who aren't and who place their emotions beyond reason (as exhibited in his ...


30

Yes, I believe Chase comes up with more correct diagnoses than any other supporting character. Firstly, this is obviously a very difficult question to answer. As discussed in the comments, how do we know who made a diagnosis? For example: Sometimes the entire team take part in an exploratory procedure where something is discovered. Who gets credit? The ...


25

In-universe, there was never an explanation. In fact, it was a plot point that House was driven rather crazy trying to figure out "what he missed". He was sure there must have been signs that Kutner was planning on committing suicide and he just didn't see them. This led to issues with his sobriety, etc. Out on universe, there's a much easier answer. The ...


22

As far as I can remember, there were two reasons for Lisa Edelstein to leave House: Her contract was ending at the end of Season 7 She was not going to get a pay rise, in fact the possibility of a pay cut I also remember reading an article at the time stating that she wanted to get a pay rise to be in line with other members of the cast, but was denied the ...


18

There is a website managed by a doctor which reviews the medicine in House M.D.. The site features in an article on Forbes titled, The Most (And Least) Medically Accurate Episodes Of 'House, M.D.'. But how realistic was the medicine behind those adrenaline- and vitriol-drenched storylines? There’s really only one authority on that: Scott Morrison, a ...


18

Because lupus is very hard to diagnose, as in initial stage symptoms are very generic to be considered as lupus. So either they have to test so many people for lupus or consider it as the last resort. Why House use it is being part of so many online articles, such as from The Conversation So why is it never lupus? Is it because its symptoms make it ...


17

There are a few medical and technical advisors who give input to the show. To name some of them: Dr. Lisa Sanders (medical technical advisor - 175 episodes) From an interview with Med Gadget: Medgadget: How did you start writing for the NYT and advising for House M.D.? Sanders: My husband, who is a writer, is incredibly social and often hosts ...


14

I don't see anything surprising in that. There are a lot of doctors (and students, nurses and patients) who love music and appreciate its therapeutic value (or just as a way to break the tedium of some long treatment or studying sessions). I used to study and later work in a variety of university hospitals as a doctor (before settling on a pure teaching ...


13

There are several reasons why pagers are still being used by medical professionals in a hospital setting. I am a nurse working in a hospital setting and although there have been discussions about moving to smartphones, pagers are still the preferred form of communication. Pagers offer several advantages over smartphones: Information must be able to be ...


12

One of my coworkers was the Art Coordinator for House and helped create the original sets. This is what she said on the subject: There is no particular significance to any item in his office or apartment, but the items were chosen to help develop the House character. Additional items accumulated over the seasons as his character grew, but old ones ...


10

I'm not certain why there's not a name in the credits (if that is the case). If I had to guess why, I'd say it's likely due to the broad variety of diagnoses they deal with so there's no one person who specializes in that many types of medicine. They do have a full team of advisers, though. The lead seems to be David Foster, who is credited as a "staff ...


9

This seems out of place given the rest of the imagery in the credits. Does anybody know what the relevance of this scene is supposed to be? There is no relevance, other than the shot was a replacement. From an interview with co-showrunner Katie Jacobs: Q: "Are the opening credits images in “House” visual metaphors for the roles the characters represent ...


9

I think it's just a reminder that Wilson will die, and that it is inevitable. It is left in the open what he will do, and left to interpretation. After doing this selfless act for someone, I'm guessing you can follow two approaches: He won't have any other reason to live after Wilson He is selfless and can try to help other people he cares about or meets ...


9

Pager technology has always allowed arbitrary alphanumeric (A-Z, a-z, 0-9, some special characters) messages of various lengths. How they are used depends on the person or company using them. Typically, short medical codes can be used, to indicate a longer or complicated situation, but proper length messages can be sent as well. Pagers can scroll messages ...


8

I don't believe we see much more of House and Stacy's relationship after the operation, but what we see in "Three Stories" very strongly implies that Stacy didn't leave House -- House left her. Remember, she knew he wanted the riskier, more painful surgery that would have left him with full use of his leg. Her choice to change the surgery, after he was ...


8

Long story short, because of money. According to this article Universal TV wanted to produce a new season but Fox network was spending $5 million per episode and wanted a cut in the show's license before renewing. They couldn't agree on an amount. "Universal came off as aggressive," one exec says. "It was such a big gap that [Fox] didn't pursue the ...


7

Although there have been a few episodes with more than one patient (typically the second patient's treatment leading to the "a ha!" moment for the first one), you're correct that most episodes of House focus on a single case. That is probably a bit unrealistic as a long-term trend. Indeed, there were several points in the show where House's budget was ...


5

Season 4 takes place after House fires his entire team and must start playing his game to find a new one. During this season however, the production crew knew that the old team members would still be a part of the show in some capacity. Foreman eventually rejoined the team, Chase became the head of Surgery, and Cameron became the head of the ER. With ...


5

House is not allowed to self-prescribe. It is not clear if this is all doctors or just Cuddy's restriction on House, but this is the case. This can be seen a few seasons later when House has to ask Wilson for a legitimate prescription.


5

There is no reason for the cat not to be real. Why would they waste time and money doing a CGI cat, when all they asked of the cat was for it to sit around, and run around? Only to end up with a inferior product? Common logic dictates the cat was real.


5

In the episode "one day, one room" (season 3 episode 12) he tells a story to a rape victim about his Dutch grandmother who he called Oma, which is actually the Dutch word for grandmother. In the end, part of that story (about mistreatment) turns out to be about his father, not his grandmother, so it's a bit vague if the rest about his grandmother was ...


4

This was mostly used as a throwaway gag. There is no future significance to the garage door. It was just to mess with Wilson and probably the ducklings as well. Keep in mind that office walls tend not to be load bearing walls, and can be moved or replaced with relative ease (so offices can e.g. be resized). The numbers are never made clear to us, but ...


3

I know this is a little late, but here is what is shown in a pager in S1E9 of House. MSG RECEIVED... CODE BLUE: JOHN HENRY GILES - RM. 324


3

I see several possibilities here. Let me elaborate: Option 1 After his time in prison, House is seen scrounging for a budget; so that he can restart his daignostics division. He has little morality about acquiring the funds, as he even tries to trick a patient into helping him. Note: House never truly lied to the patient, but House did subtly manipulate ...


3

House had 177 episodes spanning 8 years. The first Five seasons had a Christmas episode, and others had plot happen during Christmas, providing a time span of about 8 years in the show as well. There were 177 episodes, and give or take a few with no main patient or two main patients, that means roughly 175 main patients. That's 22 patients per year. This ...


3

You answered your own question. House's stating "I told you so" implies that he didn't see anything (ie there is no afterlife). http://house.wikia.com/wiki/97_Seconds


3

The studio wanted Fox to foot the production cost, Fox wanted the studio to foot the production costs. They had to trim some of the fat which meant pay cuts. The rest of the cast took the pay cut but Lisa was not having it (I don't blame her). In my opinion, The studio should have paid up to keep Lisa - what they did not realize was that Cuddy and Wilson ...


3

Well, this entirely depends on your individual view on life. With a viewpoint as cynical as Dr. House's there is probably much truth in those statements, yet with a different approach you can probably turn all those lessons into the opposite. So above all, they are accurate to House's individual view of his life based on his past experiences and his ...


2

I'm going to offer an alternative, completely opinionated answer to this question. Like @Napoleon Wilson I'll focus on the life lessons you brought up. However, I'm not going to focus solely on House, but also the context in which he said them and the show revealed them. Brace yourself - a long and completely subjective post is ahead. Everyone lies. At ...


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