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293

The 'cab' is hinged round the bottom of the box structure, probably released by Keaton at the appropriate moment, and very likely sprung to assist the demolition. The rest is just balanced on top and will fall at the slightest provocation. You only see it move about 6 feet, so it doesn't have to last long. As I can see no evidence of a rope to pull it [and ...


113

Well, I have a theory about how this scene might have been filmed, but I have no sources to confirm this as it is a very old movie. This rock can be a fake one, because using a real one will definitely hurt an actor. Now, when the rock is thrown, actor takes a jump. To make this look realistic, the timing and jump must be perfect. If you take a close look,...


52

No, the dog definitely didn't chew a hole in a real fence. Update: Word of God answer from Producer Stuart Cohen and John Carpenter!!! John Carpenter: The fence was made out of edible material. It was not metal. - Director John Carpenter, via private correspondence. Stuart Cohen: The fence was edible - made out of some combination of gelatin ...


51

For Casino Royale, yes and no: At the time of filming, Aston Martin were still in the final phases of designing the DBS. The scene involving the car crash was devised using an Aston Martin DB9 that was especially modified to look like Bond's Aston Martin DBS V12 and reinforced to withstand the impact. Instead of wrecking an incredibly rare $300,000 DBS, ...


39

The stuntman/stuntwoman wears a special flame-retardant suit under their costume. In addition, any skin which is not covered by the suit gets coated with a special gel which is flame-resistant. Additionally, there are a few people with fire extinguishers in hand who jump in immediately after the director cuts the scene to extinguish the flames.


38

The director Colin Trevorrow said it was all real. Well, up to the dinosaur part, they haven't figured out how to get around the AHA rules. The stunts for the kill scene were done by [Zara Young's actress Katie McGrath] herself. “She was game,” Trevorrow said. “That’s really her, that fall, her under the water, that’s really the actress. She completely ...


36

In addition to the fake rock theory by @AJ, it is quite possible that the rock did not travel the entire distance it appeared to. Once the rock disappears off screen, there could have been some barrier to prevent the rock continuing. This way, the rope would have enough weight to continue moving, but there would be significantly less weight pulling on ...


34

It's very broad to say yes or no. But no, they don't. They use shells, stripped down frames, with standard engines, but with the appropriate paneling to make it look like the real thing. The inside shots are done either with rentals or CGI, but the crashes are the dummies as you put it. All for budget reasons. A replica is only a fraction of the real thing. ...


30

Very simply - don't use real glass. Movies have long used sugar glass. Literally, a substance that looks like glass but is just made from sugar & water, heated until it turns into a kind of hard, clear toffee [that's 'candy' for those of you born the wrong side of the Atlantic :P]. The same thing is used for the clichéd 'bottle over the head' in fight ...


28

I remember talking at some stage to a makeup artist from a film set. They had spring-loaded syringes where the actual needle would retract into the body of the syringe. This way they get a realistic pucker effect where the needle presses against the skin.


26

For that movie it was probably using a pyro gel. It's a special gel that burns at a lower temperature (800F) and doesn't spread much, so it can be applied more precisely. To protect themselves the actors use a combination of a Stunt Gel (acts as a temperature isolation) and fire resistant clothes. That said, it's a high risk stunt and not for amateurs. The ...


25

Here's a good link regarding the filming for Need for Speed. In Need for Speed at least, they used real cars. Besides Need for Speed, they'll frequently use replicas of the shells of cars to crash. They have a special feature in The Bourne Supremacy that talks about this. In Fast and Furious: Tokyo Drift, the main characters Mustang had 5 or 6 replicas with ...


22

Industrial Light and Magic were responsible for creating the CGI bear. Yeah, it's CGI and not in-fact a real bear. They used reference footage from actual bears, even including a bear attack filmed at a zoo where a drunken man stumbled into the sanctuary. They used a stunt man to literally throw Leo around and tear at him. This meant that painting out the ...


21

Even if this particular trick is rare, it's conceptually similar to hanging scenes, which are abundant in westerns. In fake hanging, the typical trick is to attach the rope to the hidden harness while the knot is just a decoration: How is a hanging scene filmed? In addition, the "stone" is likely to be light. In our days, I'd say plastic. Then, probably ...


17

There are also commercial silicone and urathane (plastic) products that can be molded into clear glass-looking sheets. Add in a sound effect and you're done.


17

They did Alice van Springsteen was the stunt double for Ms Taylor in National Velvet Her first work as a film stuntwoman came in Will Rogers' last movie, "In Old Kentucky" (1935). A member of the Cowgirl Hall of Fame, she went on to serve as a stunt double for Elizabeth Taylor (in 1944's "National Velvet"), Marian Davis, Jane Wyman, Ingrid Bergman and ...


16

Added examples, all over 5:05 - hopefully will lose the downvote. I would say no, principally because of Jackie Chan. His movies like Supercop and Rumble in the Bronx are basically 90-minute street fights punctuated with bursts of dialogue. A few excerpts from the master of the running non-stop fight: Who Am I as an example clocks in at over 5:05. ...


16

They likely had Sofia Boutella wear special socks/coverings and added the assasin prosthetics later. Effects like this have been achievable for quite some time now, as shown by the special effects shots of Gary Sinise as Lt. Dan in the film Forest Gump. Sinise wore blue socks during filming, and his legs bellow the knee were digitally removed in post ...


15

Such a "contraption" was indeed used for Skyfall: Tight streets and alleyways meant the film crew couldn't tow a trailer carrying a vehicle while the actors were filmed inside. Thus, the team used what is called a pod system. Picture a stunt vehicle, in this case a Land Rover Defender, with a one-man roll cage welded to the roof. Inside ...


15

There's a Post online exists similar to your question. How Tom Cruise Did That Insane Plane Stunt For Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation How did this stunt actually get done? The star and director Christopher McQuarrie have revealed all in a recent interview. The filmmaker explained, "While searching for different locations, the ...


14

I did some more digging, and unbelievably, it appears everything was actually real, except where they let the bus down on the rooftop (and the crash into the building was faked of course too, as per the photo in the question). I found these Production Notes for Swordfish on this site, which included the following: Jeff Mann, who collaborated with ...


13

The key is to watch Chaplin's legs and the rope. As the rock goes off-screen and the rope is getting close to taut, his knees flex. At that point he clearly jumps into the water, with enough style (because he was an expert stuntman) to look as if he'd been pulled into the water by the rock. If you watch the rope too, you see that there's no point at which ...


12

It's probably made from sugar glass, which is a very brittle glass like material made from sugar. It's easier to break safely than real glass. It is also commonly used to make windows that people crash through during movie fights and the like.


11

I am late to this discussion, but the Weapons Specialist Ltd company makes retractable syringes and all sorts of other cool props. The website includes a video of the syringe in action.


10

While I do not have any official sources, I do not see them getting any actual syringes for a movie. It is fake as with most whether they do it with CGI (which seems a bit over the top when you have) trick syringes, or I've seen before where they just imply the shot with a cut-away.


10

Well, basically, someone pushes someone down the stairs. While the camera is running. Lately, there is special effects to digitally matte a characters face on a stuntman if they want to go an extra mile. No fake or padded stairs either. As mentioned above, stuntman and stuntwomen are ...


8

There are a hand full of ways that flood and water scenes can be done in movies. The first instance, and one that's been used more commonly the last few years, is cgi. They film the actors in front of a green screen and replace everything with computer graphics. Another example is building a set specific to the scene/s where flooding occurs. The ...


8

Perhaps the rope is loosely fastened to the rock, and detaches when the rock has reached its limit.


6

All three types of techniques are used. Fake appendages. You can use a real needle in these. Common when the appendage in question will be changed or explode or anything. All practical effects. CGI. In bigger productions, this can be a viable alternative to a prop. Most often though, it will be a combination of a prop and CGI. But the most common is special ...


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