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53

It's part timing, part cajoling and part luck. I don't know the specific laws for other countries, but in the UK, children under 5 can only be "at work" for a maximum of 5 hours a day, between 9.30 and 4.30. This is from the moment they arrive into costume or hair/makeup at base, not when they get to set. One child takes at minimum two, if not ...


25

As WC Fields would say, “Never work with children or animals”. They are unpredictable and the steal the scene. A photographer friend of mine once said that timing is everything. You can direct adults in order to get a great shot. With children and animals, they direct you. You just have to be ready to get the shot when the moment strikes. I have heard ...


21

My memory is that a number of play scenes in Kindergarten Cop (1990) with Arnold Schwarzenegger were filmed unstructured, simply with the kids left to be kids and the actors given 5 guidelines: (director) Ivan Reitman invented the five "Reitman Rules of Filmmaking" for the kids: Listen, act natural, know your character, don't look in the camera, ...


10

Clearly they're there to offer the cameraman protection. You can see they're guarding him from other actors. As you said, it's a hectic scene, and the cameraman can only look through his viewfinder to see what's directly in front of him in order to catch the proper shot. Those guys make sure he stays safe and isn't bumped into otherwise the camera will ...


10

OK, I'm going to posit this as an answer… though there is some cynicism… Edit: Let me add some late specifics... In the first picture, the girl a) has got a comfortable leverage grip on the boom b) she's used to maintaining that position, it's her job, she does it all the time & c) that "big mic" isn't big at all, it's a small, light mic inside a ...


10

In the US meal breaks for actors are regulated by the Screen Actors Guild/American Federation of Television and Radio Actors (SAG/AFTRA) and are usually provided by the Craft Services Department. According to the Union rules found here The performer must be given the first meal break within six hours from the time of first call. The provisions for meal ...


10

Often on shooting sets a table with food and snacks will be provided at all times. It's called a craft service, and it's there to provide nourishment not only for the actors but to all the filming crew. It gives the crew quick access to food and drink so that they don't need to leave the set if they get hungry. Here's a nice article on the subject.


10

There are several different types of "grips", each with varying levels of responsibility. The Key Grip is basically the unit head, and reports to the Director of Photography on a feature. They are responsible for scouting the locations, ordering, arranging transport and setup of equipment for filming and lighting. They are sometimes billed as first company ...


7

So if you pick something up once, you're considered a grip? -Mike Nelson, riffing their own credits in Mystery Science Theater 3000: The Movie (1996) Indeed, A Key Grip usually doesn't do any gripping, that is to say it's just a fancy way of saying "Grip Manager". And while we're at it, Mike is basically right that Grips just hold things such as ...


5

I'd preface this by saying that I'm no expert in this type of cinema. But there's a cinematographer on IMDb who goes by R. Diwakaran\Divakaran and one of the 3 films listed in his profile is Notebook by Mumbai Police director Rosshan Andrrews. So it might be the same guy. Note also that Mumbai Police's Wiki page inexplicably called the cinematographer both R....


5

This is/was entirely normal. It's likely that the writers were only responsible for writing perhaps a single episode or two...or perhaps just consulted on script/story re-writes. See the same list on IMDB Individual writers would often pitch or be contracted for a single episode. If you are a SF reader you'll recognise many of the names on the list of ...


3

Firstly the assumption about it being tiring actually isn't that accurate. Boom operators with some years of experience can quite happily swing a pole for 5 minutes at a time with a break in between (to reset the shot) all day - lots of it is technique and using the correct muscles and posture in your arms and core and learning how to move between these ...


2

I am the woman from the picture. Record as many separate tracks as you wish with one live mixed master. Give your editors as much as possible to work with. Lavs pick up clothing noise and are frequently the wrong prospective. (Yes, they are wearing them, and we are recording it, but it is a sword fighting scene, they are moving like crazy so the final ...


1

Probably time-constraints An article on NewscastStudio.com, Networks celebrate the holidays by paying tribute to their teams, gives a brief explanation about end-credits: Some newscasts, stations and networks opt to run full credits New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day. Other newscasts will run full credits throughout the year either as time allows or ...


1

The alternative to hand held booming was traditionally the fisher boom http://www.jlfisher.com/booms/index.asp These are expensive, require significant training and practice, and are restricted to studios. Outdoor locations would allow sand and dirt etc to get in the mechanisms, causing problems. Repairing the mechanics of these tools is also beyond the ...


1

What do all the cameramen and boom mic guys and gaffers and PAs do for those long shoots? I would expect their (union) contracts to permit only a certain length of workday, or only a certain number of 18-hour days in a row. Do they all work 18-hour days too, day in and day out? Do they alternate days? Do they have a lot of downtime that doesn't count in ...


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