19

I don't know that the director has ever spoken out directly about why he chose that specific title, other than what you pointed out: they didn't call it Oil! because it wasn't a close-enough adaptation. However, I think the title is not referencing anything you see in the movie itself (at least not much). Rather, it's warning about what's going to happen as ...


10

Along with the posted answer, I would point people towards the Book of Exodus 7:19 from the Bible: Then the LORD said to Moses, "Say to Aaron, 'Take your staff and stretch out your hand over the waters of Egypt, over their rivers, over their streams, and over their pools, and over all their reservoirs of water, that they may become blood; and there ...


7

Revenge. While the whole film deals with Daniels inhumanity in different ways, the 'tit for tat' relationship between him and Eli is clearly episodic, with its climax in the fantastically theatrical final scene in the private bowling alley. Years after suffering his final humiliation at the hands of Eli (the baptism), who by the end of the film may have ...


7

From appearances, and the way he constantly fishes pieces out of his mouth and puts them on his plate and picks his teeth, and also according to online sources (like here and here), it's a horrible, cold piece of leftover steak which he was eating before he passed out drunk. Unfortunately, it doesn't appear to be in the script, where circumstances are a bit ...


4

Firstly The accident did not initially rob H.W. of the ability to speak. Immediately after his injury, Daniel runs H.W. down to the commissary building (where the crew would eat), lays him upon a table and asks where he was hurt. H.W. replies "I can't hear my voice." This dialogue can be seen in the following clip: There Will Be Blood Clip Oil Well ...


4

The best analysis I have seen regarding There Will Be Blood can be found in Terri Murray's analysis in 2007. The "Blood" is the salt of Plainview's struggle to perceived success, the toil he survived, the men he lost, his adopted son's hearing loss, all the challenges he faced in obtaining his wealth, juxtapositioned against Eli, who did not shed blood, ...


3

Per Jonny Greenwood himself: I saw some fairly long sections of the film, read the script, and just wrote loads of music. I tried to write to the scenery, and the story rather then specific “themes” for characters. It's not really the kind of narrative that would suit that. It was all about the underlying menace in the film, the greed, and that against ...


3

Being that this turned out to be a duplicate of a question I just asked, I guess I'll pose my question as an answer: I've got some possible references, and I'm not really sure if any of them are viable: A reference to the men who died in the various mines A reference to all the people Dan Plainview killed A reference to the "war" that he had with preacher ...


3

I think Dan killed Henry because he realized that his son (adopted son) was trying to kill Henry that night when he set their room on fire because he knew that Henry was lying (he put oil around Henry's bed and then set it on fire). As a result Dan abandoned his son.


2

I have no interest in saying that there is no answer. But I want to point out that this has been discussed a lot online and no one has any idea. It's not in PT Anderson's script for the film, and there is no audio in the film at all in regards to something being whispered. It only occurs visually. Also, there is no mention of anything like this in the book! ...


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