25

This is not what she says. She says: It's like when The Wizard of Oz turns to colour. The 1939 Wizard of Oz starts in black and white and turns to color when Dororthy reaches Oz. Beverly is basically saying that she's now in Oz, an amazing and colorful wonderland as compared to the drab world outside.


22

Based on the movie alone, since I haven't read the book (or any in what would become a series of books), and though it's been a while since I've seen it, I would say that Dorothy will miss the Scarecrow most because he sacrificed the most during her time in Oz. The most harm that came to anyone, came to the Scarecrow. The Tin Man had to be oiled to join ...


11

I get the feeling it was intentionally set in both times - or at least to look like it could be. As mentioned in comments, there's nothing in the Kansas scenes that couldn't still have still been in use in the 30s, but there are no anachronistic elements that force it to be then. It had to look 'right' for the contemporary audience, but also 'feel' like it ...


8

The original book didn't have any explanation (in part, because WWotE never appeared in that scene in the book). But I can definitely address ONE of your theories: Is it referring that she (Glinda) is more powerful than the Witch? What does she mean? Possibly. First of all, in the books, Glinda, the Good Witch of the South was the most powerful of the ...


6

Because that scared timid scarecrow who was not all that smart represented a portion of her that she felt she no longer had. That innocence was gone, she no longer felt naive. Whereas she still needed courage, and compassion that was represented by the lion and the tin man.


5

It's an original riff called "Miss Gulch's / Witch's theme" by Herbert Stothart, who won an Oscar for the film's score. Also, according to Wiki: This repeated seven-note motif is actually a "crippled" variation (inverted and compressed in range) of the musical figure for "We're off to see the Wizard". Here's an interesting article about the music in the ...


5

Not all of the Wizard of Oz is in color, only the parts that take place in Oz. Everything that happens while Dorothy is still in Kansas is shot in black and white. This was of course done to underline how colorful and magical the land of Oz is compared the real-world Kansas. All of the Oz sequences were filmed in three-strip Technicolor. The opening ...


3

If you believe the Wizard of Oz blog (about 2/3rds of the way down the page) it states that: the face was that of an anonymous actor in heavy make-up, lip synching to Morgan’s dialogue. I can find no other source of information online, and being that everyone involved with the production is long gone I don't think you're going to find much else that ...


3

It is because she met him first and they formed a tight bond. There's no other explanation. (Also they had an awesome sing-a-long) :D


3

"The lean" goes back to circus performers in the late 19th century, for instance Harry "Little Titch" Relph. Le Lean n'est pas né dans le clip de Smooth Criminal mais dans les cirques de la fin du 19ème siècle, peut-être même avant. L'un des plus anciens numéros de lean connus était pratiqué par un artiste du nom de Harry Relph, plus connu sous le ...


2

I took Oz The Great And Powerful to be set much earlier than The Wizard of Oz. If you take Oz to be set at the time when it was made in 1939, and Oz-TGAP to be set when you were suggesting, around 1900, that gives you about a forty year difference. This would account for the difference in the Wizard. The Wizard, being from our world, would age as we would ...


2

Some of it is explained: In the original script (by Noel Langley, Florence Ryerson and Edgar Allan Woolf) there’s no mention of a gun. The ax is explicitly referenced. The bug spray and net are left over from a previous musical number called “The Jitterbug” that was shot but cut in the editing room. (The song — with such lyrics as, “Oh, the bats and the ...


1

For the technique of beginning and ending with one story while telling different stories in the middle, I would refer to the outer story as a "framing device", or "frame story". The collective work as a whole could be called a "nested narrative", or "story within a story". It sounds like you have 2 stories in your example: one telling the events leading up ...


1

I think this is a reference to the parts of the film that were ultimately deleted, as are a few others. What we didn't see in the finished film were scenes at the beginning, where Hunk and Dorothy are having a conversation which alludes to the true nature of their relationship and where Hunk is tinkering with a windmill-like invention of his. We do, ...


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