83

Aluminium plate rings, used for separating dinner plates between plating up & serving; keeps the food warmer for longer. Plate rings have a characteristic bottom lip which will 'hook' over the plate beneath, & sloped or slightly curving sides, to meet the moulded ring on the underside of the plate stacked above, preventing slippage. They may have ...


52

This was shot inside a set and Jack Nicholson himself posed for the scene. Jack Nicholson posing for his final moment frozen in the snow. This side angle reveals the crude bracing system of wood and Styrofoam that was built to hold Nicholson as still as possible for the lengthy shot. Here we can see that Nicholson has his mouth closed. And in the above pic ...


47

That line was ad-libbed by Jack Nicholson as an imitation of Ed McMahon's intro for The Tonight Show. From here: Jack Nicholson ad-libbed the line "Here's Johnny!" in imitation of announcer Ed McMahon's famous introduction of Johnny Carson on U.S. network NBC-TV's long-running late night television program The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson. ...


44

The Shining used the then newly-invented device called a Steadicam to shoot these (and many other) scenes: This film was among the first half-dozen to use the newly developed Steadicam (after the 1976 films Bound for Glory, Marathon Man, and Rocky), and was Kubrick's first use of it. This is a stabilizing mount for a motion picture camera, which ...


39

It looks like you're asking about the 1980 Stanley Kubrick movie. In that movie it's not clearly defined the exact location of the hotel. However we are given a few facts to narrow down the location: The Overlook is located somewhere in the Colorado Rockies. The Overlook is 25 miles from the nearest town; Sidewinder. Sidewinder however is a fictional town,...


36

Per director Stanley Kubrick: The ballroom photograph at the very end suggests the reincarnation of Jack. How does it relate to the movie? It sort of echoes the "You’ve always been the caretaker." line earlier in the film, which suggests something along the lines that his soul is perpetually stuck at/destined to end up at that hotel.


32

It's a commercial walk-in refrigerator door handle, known as a 'push-strike' Basically it just pushes through the door onto the regular latch on the outside so you can get out... unless in this case someone has locked it from the outside. You can bump it with your butt if your hands are full. Late edit: I found a shot of both sides of the door from the ...


15

It's a goof due to different aspect ratios of different media. The Helicopter shadow was not in the original theater release, only showing up when packaged for other media. According to the pilot: Due to Blyth's impaired sight lines, the camera operator concludes Kubrick “just liked those particular shots and didn't worry about the shadows.” He then ...


14

I'm not sure your premise "there should not be any supernatural activity going on in the film" is correct. Why couldn't it have been a ghost who opened the door? There are several other examples of supernatural activity in the film, such as: Danny's and Halloran's ability to communicate via "shining" Danny's visions of the murdered girls, which he had no ...


13

Don't think there is one.. It is to make him look more sinister :) If he was looking down he would look disappointed, if he looked straight ahead, he "might" look normal, but by looking up he looks like a psychopath. Another note is the "Kubrick stare": Kubrick used that effect to great ..effect.. to make his actors look ...


12

This is a big question to a very deep and complicated film! Kubrick mentions how it 'suggests' the reincarnation of Jack, he does not say that this suggestion is correct. Notice how the surrounding furniture is covered in white sheets and the sign for the Goldroom is on the other side to the previous position. It would imply some kind of time shift or ...


10

According to this essay: Kubrick's film claims the Overlook Hotel is built on an Indian burial ground, though this is only mentioned in passing. King's Pet Sematary (1983) does feature such a burial ground, but this novel does not. We are given few hints to the root of the hotel's evil, if there is a root. King has suggested that the Overlook is a ...


10

From Wikipedia: "All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy" is a proverb. It means that without time off from work, a person becomes both bored and boring. The exact origins of the phrase remain unclear, though it was recorded as early as 1659.


9

TL;DR: We will never know for sure, but it so highly unlikely. Well... hate to break it to you but probably not. It is rather difficult to prove he didn't, and honestly it doesn't make sense to prove someone did not do something (burden of proof). Apart from proving from a legal view points, there are some thoughts that can shed some lights on the issue. ...


5

According to Wikepedia, it's considered a horror film. The Shining is a 1980 horror film produced and directed by Stanley Kubrick[7] and co-written with novelist Diane Johnson. The film is based on Stephen King's 1977 novel The Shining. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Shining_(film) However, many consider the film a pyschological-thriller or ...


3

I don't think it's foreshadowing. If you look at the chandeliers being reflected, Jack has already passed under the chandelier that is reflected in the last mirror, before that chandelier is shown. I.e. Jack is too close by the time he passes the last mirror to be shown in it.


1

The shining did not cause the events at the hotel, as it does not "bring things to life." However, the events at the hotel happened because Danny had the shining. Simply put, the hotel wanted Danny dead so his spirit could be added to the hotel, which would give it more shining. The shining is a set of abilities that include interacting with spirits, ...


1

I'd interpret this scene as Ullman acting as an agent of the Overlook hotel in order to get Danny back. The whole Shining - both the book and the movie - is about the evil hotel trying to use the supernatural qualities of Danny - something that Hallorann called "shining" - in order to multiply its own powers of evil. Now that Danny (and his mother) got ...


1

In reference to the great Rob Ager, it could come to mean that 'Jack' never existed, that he was merely an illusionary character used to symbolize the American man's obsessions with wealth, power and standing within a society. As Grady states "You've always been the caretaker", Jack is forever trapped within a cycle of pursuing a wealth, or a dream (the ...


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