19

Here's a screenshot of the scene referred to in the question: Veteran actor Richard Jenkins, who plays Giles, the gay best friend and neighbor of Elisa Esposito (Sally Hawkins), explains this in an interview with Washington Blade : The seasoned actor is also full of admiration for writer/director Guillermo Del Toro. “He is amazing, like no one ...


13

I'm so glad someone else is asking this question. My take on it: Green = mask/lie Red = true self/truth Here's incomplete evidence: Strickland Strickland eats green candies. Strickland drives the car everyone keeps calling green (even him when he buys it!). I think Strickland's house is also green (need to verify this). (This is gross, but bare with ...


11

I don't recall the specific scene, however... Would you buy a 'fresh' fish right off the dock if you knew it was a week old? No. So trying to sell them is not profitable. Fresh fish sells, old fish doesn't. Presumably, they were talking about 'news' or 'salient information' In short, last week's news is already known. Post a link to the scene in ...


5

The scene is a foreshadowing of a later moment of nears ecstatic intimacy for Eliza, wherein she and the amphibious man purposely flood part of her flat, in order for her to experience the weightlessness of his world. Less directly, it's a thematic indicator; Eliza eventually comes to discover that her 'world' is underwater; that being her natural, ...


4

According to a throwaway remark in this interview with Michael Shannon and Michael Stuhlbarg by SYFY WIRE, the candy was specifically designed for the movie. Its color was described explicitly in the script. The interview touches on the subject from about 3:00:


4

The details you provided indeed suggest Elisa shares similarities with the Amphibious Man, or impart, in the least, an uncertainty about her origins. In a conversation with Joe Utichi from Deadline, Guillermo del Toro emphasized the aquatic nature of Sally Hawkins' character: She (Sally Hawkins) had been writing her own story about a woman who didn’t ...


3

The restaurant is a chain franchise. In the script it's called "Dixie Doug's" and it's meant to give the impression that it specializes in pie from the Southern United States. Giles is eating Key Lime Pie (which originates in Florida). The guy running the restaurant (Pie Guy in the script) is putting on a fake Southern United States accent, hence the use ...


3

The movie is subtitled when Elisa has no translator and we need to know what she's saying... At the point, we see her sign 'trivial' and Zelda translates for Strickland [and the audience] After they are dismissed, she quickly signs something for which there is neither inworld nor subtitle translation - after he asks her to "Say that again" she signs it ...


3

Elisa is phonetically spelling out 'Fuck You'.


3

The vibe I get from Del Toro is that the film is completely representational of cinema and the story therein is a secret condemnation of how the evolved movie machine is attempting to destroy the true artistry of film. The monster being studio greed, represented by the color green. The protagonists each represent varying degrees of past film ages OR ...


1

I doesn't seem to be any other connection besides Del Toro being a fan and using the same voice actress in these movies.


1

Green is used widely through the “real world” (ie: the lab, the city, her apartment) The movie also mentions that teal is the color of the future/ the man of tomorrow, and specified that it is NOT green. (The Cadillac scene) The colors red and black also seem important as the main character slowly transitions from green clothes to red. Red is also used as ...


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