74

He says this to keep the Princess calm and moving forward -- which is their best chance of surviving. He is concerned she might do something irrational like go back or take off in some random direction. He knows that just maybe they will be left alone, and his ploy will succeed. If not, then he has no control over it anyway, and will have to deal with it at ...


52

The reason for this is because the Dread Pirate Roberts was actually a good man and a man of honor. When meeting Inigo he is promised that he will not be killed before reaching the top, with Inigo even swearing on the soul of his father and throwing a rope down to help Roberts to climb. Once on the top he again urges Roberts to wait until he is ready to ...


39

It's a White Lie. He knows they exist, as you said, he's just seen one, but he lies to Buttercup to make her feel safer. Wikipedia Definition: White lies are minor lies which could be considered harmless, or even beneficial, in the long term. White lies are also considered to be used for greater good. White lies are often used to shield someone from a ...


16

The ROUS that he saw before was much smaller than the one that attacks right after he says the quoted line. So he sees a largish, but not dangerous rodent and assumes that the tales of the deadly ROUSes are exaggerated. I'm pretty sure this is the first one he sees: Compare the size of the ROUS above (perhaps a baby?) with the diameter of the tree branch. ...


13

A.bakker has a great answer, but misses an important point. The Dread Pirate Roberts is a pirate, and one with a very specific reputation. Fezzik and Inigo are obvious underlings and just following orders, yet they do show honor. Vizzini, on the other hand, takes pride in being a snake. He has no problems showing his bad side (as that might be the only side ...


8

"Never fight a land war in Asia" is one of those weird aphorisms that is widely known, but on which nobody agrees who originally said it. It has variously been attributed to Bernard Montgomery (British General), Dwight Eisenhower (American General and later President), and Douglas MacArthur (American General). The line was in the original book by William ...


8

Getting involved in a land war in Asia is a classic blunder in the real world. Examples from before The Princess Bride include: The Korean War The Vietnam War The Russian War in Afghanistan All three were land wars in Asia that have been seen as mistakes. Grave mistakes. Epic blunders. Arguably the most famous classic blunders. You could also include ...


7

Vizzini posed an immediate danger to Buttercup... Fezzik and Inigo posed no immediate threat to Buttercup, and their behavior suggested to Westley that they probably would not kill her even if they had the chance. They both showed themselves to be people of honor who would shun killing in an unfair circumstance. Vizzini on the other hand had a knife to ...


6

It's unclear but it seems that this may just have been Billy Crystal ad-libbing a few words. Certainly the original book by William Goldman has nothing and the same is true in his screenplay adaptation. “Humiliations galore,” Inigo said. “Now that’s what I call a worth-while reason,” Miracle Max said. “Give me the sixty-five; I’m on the case.” The Princess ...


4

I didn't actually think that this particular scene could be understood in any other way.... The Scene in Question And the Line Westley: ...There's a shortage of perfect breasts in this world... From context alone, I find it nearly impossible to understand how one could be confused by this line.... But we can at least have a look at the definition and ...


4

I've always assumed he meant her chest as a whole. Not in this instance. Despite the knife placement Westley is referring to her mammary glands....it's tongue-in-cheek....I dare say "cheeky" humour.


4

Raj referenced "The Prince Bride" in the episode The Workplace Proxemity (S7E5). In this episode, Raj tells Leonard that he and Howard were eating cookie dough while watching The Princess Bride. These are the only two references of "The Prince Bride" in TBBT and I assume that they have nothing to do with Kripke’s speech impediments, because Kripke pretends ...


4

Looked at from a bird's eye view: Vizzini's death falls into the "just deserts" category. He's a difficult sort who could probably make Gandhi want to punch him in the nose (so very little emotional connection with the audience; they won't be disappointed to see him go). He shows no concern for putting others at risk to further his own goals; he's ...


1

The only thing resembling any sort of a connection is this: There is a book "The Princess Story" which has one of the HBC's ships in it, which has a similar title to "The Princess Bride". No other relations between the movie and the HBC company can be found online, so it is safe to assume, that this is either meaningless and accidental or some inside joke ...


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