120

He did eventually (after some years: remember that Gollum has a hatred and fear of the Sun, the Moon and other creatures, so it took some time) leave the Misty Mountains in pursuit of Bilbo Baggins, but was eventually drawn south, towards Mordor, because all evil was being drawn to Mordor, at the time. This is how he discovered the secret stair by Minas ...


90

First of all, the possession of the ring didn't stay entirely without effect even to Bilbo. Remember how everyone was surprised at Bilbo's apparently unaged looks compared to his actual age (and his pretty fast aging once he didn't have the ring anymore). And also remember his reluctance to give up the ring (into which he had to be seriously "persuaded" by ...


84

There are a few possible reasons for this: The room was specially made for Bilbo, and therefore everything was proportioned for a Hobbit The room was a recovery room for Elves, and so the railings were lower so that they could see over them while laying in bed Elves are much more agile, and might prefer lower railings aesthetically. They wouldn't really ...


62

Sauron is aware that Gollum owned the ring for many years and lost it to "Bagginses" from "The Shire". He sends the nine Ring Wraiths to look for it. They will have learned that the ring is being carried by a team of small people called Hobbits, but the Nine are defeated at the border of Rivendell. The next thing that Sauron hears is when a small person ...


55

For a character to be protected by copyright, it must be an original creation. Tolkien never had a copyright on elves or orcs, because both of those creatures existed in literature prior to The Lord of the Rings. On the other hand, Hobbits were an original creation, so the use of a Hobbit character would require a license from the Tolkien estate. That's why ...


54

I've always attributed that to dementia; remember that Bilbo was very old for a hobbit (about 128 years); only the Old Took had been older. Bilbo attended the Council of Elrond where the history of the ring was explained by Gandalf and Elrond and the plan was made to destroy it in Mount Doom. 'That is the warning bell for the Council of Elrond,' cried ...


53

You'll find a lot of explanations on our sister site Science Fiction & Fantasy, e.g. Why didn't Sauron guard Mount Doom?. Those focus on the books, and most texts there didn't make the movies, but it can be explained from the movies alone, I think. Basically, Sauron thinks everybody has the same intentions as he does, so the one wielding the Ring will ...


45

Tom Bombadil as a creation precedes much of the LOTR mythology. He appears first in a 1934 poem "The Adventures of Tom Bombadil", where he is a "'merry fellow' living in a small valley close to the Withywindle river, where he wanders and explores nature at his leisure." (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Bombadil). Bombadil does not really fit into the ...


44

Sauron knew that a hobbit had the ring, and knew that Saruman had been searching for it as well. The book makes it clear (if we trust that Gandalf's guesses about Sauron's state of mind are correct) that when Sauron saw Pippin using the palantír, Sauron knew nothing of Saruman's defeats and thought that the palantír was still in Saruman's possession in ...


40

The movies as a whole primarily tell the story of the destruction of the ring. So when the ring is destroyed, that is the climax of the movie, and movies almost always end shortly after the climax. I read the books for the first time shortly after the first movie came out, and when the ring was destroyed only halfway though book 6 (the second half of Return ...


39

As explained on the Science Fiction & Fantasy Stack Exchange: The name "Gollum" goes back a long way, back to shortly after he found the Ring. See "The Shadow of the Past", the second chapter of the first book in The Fellowship of the Ring: They kicked him, and he bit their feet. He took to thieving, and going about muttering to himself, and ...


39

This is a key plot point: Sauron never even thinks of the possibility that the Ringbearer will try to destroy the Ring. He cannot imagine somebody voluntarily giving up that much power. From the book: Gandalf: For he is very wise, and weighs all things to a nicety in the scales of his malice. But the only measure that he knows is desire, desire for ...


38

In the book it was explained that Grima's final plan in Rohan (or at least what Saruman had promised him) was to marry Éowyn and become the next King of Rohan (of course still at the orders of Saruman). Not only did he want the throne but he also wanted Éowyn herself. Saruman had just ordered his army to go to Helm's Deep and kill everyone there, which ...


37

This is not just particular to the movies, but also to the books. Tolkien intentionally chose to translate and transliterate Westron to English. From the Tolkien Gateway: According to Tolkien's fiction, Westron was the language spoken and understood by the protagonists of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. Many names of characters and places, in the book'...


37

They can't die by age, but they can die by the sword or grief. According to Tolkien, once an Elf becomes an adult, they stop getting older. They are also less vulnerable against physical damage, but they aren't immortal. The lives of Elves only endure as the world endures. Elves could be slain or die of grief (their spirit leaves their body), but were not ...


35

I saw the films in the order that they were released and I have read the Hobbit and halfway through the LotR tome. Here is a personal opinion: Suggested ordering: Read the Hobbit Watch LotR films (perhaps many times each!) Read the LotR book Watch the Hobbit films if the nostalgia is unbearable. (Switching (2) and (3) can also be recommended.) My Reasons: ...


34

I would start with the Hobbit first. Some things that happen in the Hobbit franchise have no "stakes" if you watch the 3 LotR movies first. The Hobbit also gives back story for the main LotR story. There are risks that characters in the Hobbit take. If you watch the Lord of the Rings first, you'll know the outcome of the risks, and the tension in the Hobbit ...


34

Yes, the Balin referred here is in fact the same Balin that was part of Thorin's company. And yes, in Moria, Gimli is referring to the same Balin, who was the Lord of Moria, by the time he was slain by goblins. So your question is how he could be a cousin of Gimli? To put it simply, Gimli was Balin's first cousin once removed. LOTR wiki states this as ...


34

It is as Saruman said - the mining activity of the Dwarves who originally built the mines awakened the Balrog. They are so sure because this was a historic event which resulted in the downfall of the Dwarves of Khazad-dum (known as Moria thereafter), which Saruman also alludes to. The movie doesn't explain beyond those vague references, but according to ...


34

While I think @SJuan76's answer is on the right track, it's too specific. There is no indication he sheds a tear for Eowyn specifically, as he can't even be sure she's at Helm's Deep. I think many events indicate he's shedding a tear for the end of Rohan. There are multiple indications in the movie he's deep down still a proud man of Rohan. After Isengard'...


29

The Three Musketeers When Alexander Salkind and his son Ilya produced The Three Musketeers in 1973 they shot so much footage that they decided to split it into two movies: The Four Musketeers (1974). This had ramifications and resulted in the Salkind Clause: For their daring, the Salkinds have gone down in legal history: actors' agents and lawyers adopted ...


27

Wikipedia Historically, giving a lock of ones hair to someone has been considered a sign of love and devotion, especially before an impending separation. It is still a popular trope in fiction, particularly the romance genre. In this case, Gimli is quite enraptured with Galadriel's beauty....he's never seen anything or anyone quite so beautiful......


25

There's a recurring theme in The Lord Of The Rings, both novels and movie, that showing mercy towards wrongdoers is an act of highest morality, and that killing should be done only for defense, not for revenge. The clearest example of this is Gollum. In the first movie there's this bit of dialogue, taken verbatim from the books: FRODO ...


24

Question 1: Who is our hero in this film? Frodo or Sam? You are right in that Frodo could at the end not withstand the power of the ring and was corrupted like all the others. Only once the ring was destroyed was he free of his desire for it. This way Sam could indeed be seen as the true hero, always loyally holding to Frodo and not falling to the power of ...


24

First of all: Yes, you probably should watch at least The Two Towers before reading much further: that movie is all about Saruman's plans and schemes. Having said that, there's a combination of things that have driven Saruman to act the way he does in the Lord of the Rings trilogy. The first thing you need to realize is just how long a gap there was between ...


23

Gandalf did not know then that it was the One Ring. He simply suspected it. He realised Smeagol had called it that in the past and understood then there was an even deeper magical power behind this than he realised. He suspected it could be the One Ring, but he needed proof and to know for sure. If you remember, he left the Shire immediately to learn more ...


23

There have been two awakenings. According to the lore of the books, this Balrog (one of many), known as Durin's Bane, lay dormant for more than five thousand years at the roots of the mountain Barazinbar beneath the dwarf kingdom of Khazad-dûm [later known as Moria]. It remained undisturbed throughout the Second Age and most of the Third Age, until ...


22

You need to listen to the entire line of dialogue or you won't understand the meaning. What Gandalf says is: Indeed I am Saruman, one might almost say, Saruman as he should have been. He clearly is not claiming to be the same person, or even to have taken Saruman's name. He's claiming that he is the wizard that Saruman was supposed to be when they were ...


22

No. It's a technical issue (sort of) Original Source - Quora Wikipdia Due to technical mishaps involving Bloom's contact lenses, in the films Legolas' eye colour sometimes changes between brown, purple, and blue. (In the director's commentary of the Extended Edition, Peter Jackson admitted that they forgot to put Bloom's contacts in several times.) ...


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