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27

To put pressure on an already emotional Simba and force him to take the blame for his fathers death. By saying "Simba, what have you done?" He is forcing Simba to be the scapegoat. If he had asked "Simba, what happened?" or "what's wrong", Simba might respond in a calm manner he might have cleared his mind slightly allowing him to think straight. At ...


22

Simba gets respect from pride lands animals but why? One of the things Mufasa was trying to teach Simba when he was young was about the delicate balance in nature. Mufasa: Everything you see exists together, in a delicate balance. As king, you need to understand that balance, and respect all the creatures-- from the crawling ant to the leaping antelope. ...


14

Tom Sito, one of the animators on the film, confirmed that it says "SFX" in an interview with Huffington Post. What appears to happen: After Simba kicks up some dust, the word “sex” appears in the sky and your childhood is ruined. The explanation: According to Sito, the word isn’t a subliminal sexual message. It’s just a shout out to the ...


11

The song was created when the film was made, but cut for the initial theatrical release. However, it was added in later for some IMAX and home video releases, mainly due to the song being included in the live Broadway production of The Lion King. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_lion_king#Soundtrack


9

Is it possible for lions to survive in real life on bugs? Yes but he need to eat way more then he can possibly eat in that situation. From cinemablend.com Lion needs something between 8,000 and nearly 9,000 calories a day. Crickets, according to one example, are 121 calories per 100 grams. This would mean a full-grown Simba would need to eat 24,292 ...


5

Possibly, Yes. I have yet to find a direct source to Romeo & Juliet, but The Lion King is influenced by Shakespeare's Hamlet. The Lion King was the first Disney animated feature to be an original story, rather than be based on an already existing work. The filmmakers have said that the story of The Lion King was inspired by the lives of Joseph ...


4

There is not really any best order, as you already know The Lion King is the first film in franchise and The Lion King II: Simba's Pride is the sequel, so that's the order which matters. The Lion King 1½ take place before, during and after The Lion King, so you should watch it after The Lion King but not necessarily before or after The Lion King II.


4

Although you ask the question as per Scar's perspective, and have another answer which addresses that, you also mention Simba and his perspective. Simba didn't consider all those things which you elucidate. Quite simple. In his mind, he was responsible for Mufasa's death. Ergo, he had no reason to doubt that Scar would be wrong — or even to doubt how ...


3

If you walked into a room with 2 people in it, and one had been murdered, it wouldn't be an unreasonable assumption that the person still standing had something to do with it. Scar walks up to a this exact scene: Simba and Mufasa are by themselves, and Mufasa has been killed. So I don't think it's unreasonable for Scar to play the part of someone who had ...


2

According to the Lion King Fan Wiki, The Outsiders were an offshoot of Simba's pride, who decided to remain loyal to Scar after his death. We are suppose to assume that they were there during the course of the first film and that not all of the lionesses supported Simba after all. Outsiders (also known as Outlanders) are an offshoot of Simba's pride. ...


2

A large predatory mammal can indeed survive on bugs, generally. Grizzly bears routinely survive for lengths of time primarily on moths. Bears don't survive on them for long stretches of time. But yes, it's certainly possible for an animal like a lion to survive on bugs. They would need to find them in concentrated quantities, but bugs do tend to gather that ...


2

To further the other answer and to then include The Lion King 1 1/2, The Lion King II, and The Lion Guard... When we look back at The Lion King and how Mufasa sees "the circle of life" and/or what he believes to be the correct place of The Lions in nature, you have to consider that these beliefs go beyond the natural explanations (i.e.: Lions becoming part ...


2

First of all, birds do live a long life. I owned an African Gray and a Double Yellowneck and both had a life expectancy in the 70's. And they do look exactly the same during almost that entire time. However, in the context of Disney, this is merely to establish continuity among beloved characters. You want a 4 or 5 year old to recognize Timon and Pumba ...


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