37

From Chapter 2 of the first book: To the everlasting credit of the people of District 12, not one person claps. Not even the ones holding betting slips, the ones who are usually beyond caring. Possibly because they know me from the Hob, or knew my father, or have encountered Prim, who no one can help loving. So instead of acknowledging applause, I ...


32

You are looking at the unfortunate Lavinia. She is a non-character in the movies, but does play some role in the novels. Note - If you go to any of these links, there are spoilers for the third book. If you haven't read it, be wary. From the Wikipedia she is: An Avox (a servant whose tongue has been cut out as punishment for treason). She has red hair, ...


29

It is unknown whether Snow changed the plan for the third quarter quell to send Katniss back into the Games but it is likely that he did. A great number of the games were planned at the outset of the creation of the Hunger Games, including the concept of the Quarter Quell having an extra twist, but there's no information, either in the films or in the books ...


29

The story takes place in the future. There is a bunch of unexplained tech around, like the force fields in the arena and the practice area. As far as I remember the books and movies, they are not explicitly explained, but rather waved away as sci-fi futuretech. Most likely it is not magic that is responsible for the effects, but technology. Remember: ...


29

In the third novel, Mockingjay, we see a window into how the Hunger Games are operated. Events are triggered by devices called pods which have been placed ahead of time, and can be activated by triggers. While the movie might at times appear to show the Hunger Games as running on almost holodeck-level technology, every time we see a more solid description of ...


26

It's not a part of the training center. It's what Peeta did for his assessment. He's been well established in the books and films as being a very talented artist – decorating cakes, and himself. Peeta used dyes from the assessment room to paint an image of Rue and it's what earned him his 12 along with Katniss'. From the book: Peeta seems to be struck with ...


20

The Hunger Games: Catching Fire was rated 12A in the UK, which gives you one "F" word to use without affecting the age rating of the film. Any more and you get hit with a 15 rating, which would have negatively impacted the films box office takings as less people in the film's target age range would have been able to see it. It's likely that this is why the ...


19

TLDR: We don't know conclusively, but it's almost certain that the 75th Games (which were planned) were altered to include former winners so as to kill off Katniss (and subdue the rebellion). Answer: I think you've answered your own question. In Catching Fire, following Katniss and Peeta's victories, frustration among the people is growing. They have seen ...


16

Peeta was the one that painted Rue, just before Katniss was called for her assessment. The entire scene is much different in the book, and essentially glossed over, leaving it to the audience to figure it out. In the movie, we only see the painting, and no reference to it before or after the assessment. Just Katniss' reaction to it. It reminded her of Rue's ...


15

I have read all three books and seen both the films. In both media, both Gale and Peeta love Katniss but not in the same way. Peeta's love comes unconditionally, with devotion, and a complete willingness to sacrifice whereas Gale's love, I think, hinges on the fact that Gale and Katniss are comrades in the revolution against the Capitol. Another way to say ...


14

I think there are a few reasons behind this. Firstly, it allowed Katniss Everdeen, the symbol of the revolution, to be seen and admired by all the Districts. Her appearance as a Mockingjay before the 75th Games began would have been inspirational to all the fighters in the Districts. It sent the message even though she couldn't avoid the Games and couldn't ...


12

We don't know, as the films/novel appear to differ. In the films, it is initially implied that he ate the poisoned berries though. We see him locked in the room at the end of the films with the berries. However, as you say Plutarch tells Katniss something different: Plutarch: Seneca decided to quit breathing. Katniss: Decided? Plutarch: It was that or ...


11

Maybe because it's a B and not 13? There is another one which is to the right which you can make out through the fence.


9

There's not a very simple answer to this: both love Katniss, and she makes her choice in the course of the trilogy. As of the first two books/movies, Katniss prefers Gale, but pretends to love Peeta for the sake of public opinion: In The Hunger Games, to play up the "star-crossed lovers" story in order to get sponsors. In Catching Fire, to try to keep peace ...


9

OK, first if you have not read Mockingjay, then I would want you to know that both Peeta and Gale are Katniss' love interest as both have qualities that she adores, e.g. Peeta can make her feel safe, whereas Gale gives her strength. While Gale is ready to slaughter anyone to ensure his and his people's safety, Peeta would rather surrender himself than to ...


8

Snow's control of the Capital relies on keeping them constantly entertained, so that they care for nothing except their spectacles, their dramas, and the big stories that are constantly pumped on the television. For that, Snow wanted them emotionally invested in the Katniss/Peeta love story. Exposing her as opportunistic or duplicitous might have harmed her ...


8

Pure and simply, Guilt. Katniss feels guilt for many things in her life. She feels guilty for leaving her sister alone with her mom as she was pulled into the Games. She feels that she is the provider to her family since her father died, and when she can no longer do that, she feels guilty for not being able to support them anymore (she assumes she will ...


7

This is explained a little more in the Novel, and is easier to understand with the hindsight of knowing Plutarch Heavensbee was subversively finding ways to assist the tributes who were complicit in the revolution... It doesn't explicitly state 'Plutarch did this because of this and this...' because that would be terrible clunky writing, and Collins is a ...


6

Some good answers before this one but all of them sidelined one crucial detail or rather person: Plutarch Heavensbee (RIP Mr Hoffman) After Crane was killed due to the debacle of 74th Hunger Games, we see Plutarch being appointed as head Gamekeeper and a very close associate of President Snow. Plutarch was giving an angry and anxious Snow valuable ...


5

This is a flashback of Marvel, the tribute who killed Rue in the first film. In retaliation, Katniss killed him. As a review of this page shows, this was the first person she killed, which is likely why she is having flashbacks.


5

After the victory tour, President Snow sees the effects of Katniss on the Districts and the riots. He was planning to eliminate her, but Plutarch Heavensbee offers to take her into the games to give the districts a message: Even the strongest among all are weak against the Capitol and even they can be killed easily by the Capitol So the Quarter Quell game ...


5

This is just what I gathered from both the book and film. It's likely that the group was being watched by the others. If they'd left anything behind it would arouse their suspicion and risk failure. Being the larger and more dangerous group it would be more secure for them to be seen to move as a group rather than leave people behind.


5

PG-13 Movies are generally allowed a maximum of 1 non-sexualized use of the f-bomb per movie. There can be exceptions to this rule. From the Daily Mail: Officially, the MPAA's Classification and Ratings Administration's guidelines state: 'A motion picture's single use of one of the harsher sexually-derived words, though only as an expletive, initially ...


4

In the books, the rules for the Quarter Quells were established in sealed envelopes when the games were first established. The deleted scene suggests that Plutarch changed the envelopes to change what would actually happen, but also in the movie he is on screen suggesting to President Snow that Katniss be put in the games so that Snow is not the one ...


3

Note that Heavensbee, the current gamemaker, is in fact working for the insurgents. He would have absolute power to decide to create something like a lightning tree, for Beetee to use. And since its hazardous nonetheless, it doesn't raise any other official's eyebrows.


3

Andrew Martin's answer gives an excellent description of this character, but without citing any canonical sources. I've found the Hunger Games Wikia to be particularly unreliable even among Wikias, so I'm going to add another answer with actual book quotes. She appears in the first book but not until the second film, and is used as a plot device to help us, ...


3

In a deleted scene of Hunger Games: Catching Fire (The movie), Plutarch switches the envelope of the original plan for the 75th Hunger Games with a new plan President Snow proposed to him earlier in another deleted scene. After switching the envelopes, he burns the original and puts the new envelope into a vault to be opened on the announcement date. The ...


3

Backstory The games are inherently unfair. Sometimes players attempt an action the gamekeeper doesn't allow - such as hiding. The gamekeeper then employs field elements to cause the player to abandon their plan and come back into play. This happens several times during the first game. Further, the gamekeeper is responsible for keeping the games ...


2

TLDR: I believe it was because Snow had ordered them not to, as he believed he was defusing the situation by sending her to another Hunger Games (and eliminating her in it). Suppressing the rebellions elsewhere wasn't working - it was making things worse. Answer: At this stage in the films (and novels), the rebellions are becoming more pronounced and ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible