4

The numbers are : the pinball machine score - and an early hint not to trust the automaton/machines. the golden ratio and things ascribed to be that ratio. A major artistic/natural phenomena that is supposedly the most appealing to the human eye. 227 is the number of times she has seen the woman leave the villa. When he asks them all if they've seen fake!...


3

Early in the movie the numbers she was shouting appear to be the score of the electronic pinball machine that the guy was playing. Presumably she could calculate the score by the machine's ringing and bells. i don't know what the other numbers were.


2

When Claire disappears, Virgil gets to a local bar and asks if someone has seen her. He meets Nana, a woman in a wheelchair, who turns out to be the real owner of the villa (and of all the forniture) and also the real Claire. The woman says she rents her house to movie producers, Claire and Robert.


1

This is one interpretation: Shot all over northern Italy, Vienna and Prague, the film’s precise setting is deliberately left a blank. As in the director’s A Pure Formality and The Unknown Woman, the anonymous location “somewhere in Europe” makes it easier to accept an international cast speaking English. See: this review. I cannot verify its authority ...


1

I think that's also a part of their (Robert and Claire) plan. After Robert seeing Claire, he tells to Virgil something like "Claire is more beautiful than you described and I think I like her" and Virgil replies "are you trying to make me jealous?" Since Virgil firmly believed that Robert is expert on women's matters, I think Robert is trying to send a ...


1

I've been trying to figure this out as well. Why link the automaton to the dwarf? For the automaton to work fully it required a brilliant dwarf. Possibly for the stealing scheme to fully work they also had to use a brilliant dwarf. Symbolizes the fake artist showing his brushstroke. There's always clues in a forgery and Oldman ignored them when they were ...


1

I just don't understand why the main character, Oldman, would be betrayed by his long time friend....unless I look at it...not as a betrayal..but as an elaborate plan to change his friends life before they both retire. I say this because as far as I can tell the only things stolen were these portraits of women. Nothing else in his home is missing. in the ...


1

I think that Virgil spent time at the asylum immediately after losing all his paintings, and Claire. While there, he realized everyone's role in the heist, and also reflected on his relationship with Claire. He was heartbroken and lost. It seems that he became healthier, and finally came to grips with it all. Later, going back out into the world, without ...


1

I loved this movie! I have to admit the ending was a bit baffling. In retrospect; I believe the ending was actually the ending. I think he ran to the villa, talked with the real Claire and figured out the truth. I think then he had the breakdown and eventually clung to hope which led him to wait for her to come back. Well anyway. Love is fleeting at best. ...


1

I think VO(Rush) was in the Asylum shortly after the heist took place and this is where he looks back on the events that took place,this is when we see all he did prior to the asylum. The end is after leaving the asylum, believing he's figured out Claire's one true detail that "the forger" always leaves and moves to Prague with the belief that he'll one day ...


1

This is my interpretation: Remember this quotation: Claire: In an old article of yours I found on the internet, you said: There's something authentic in every forgery. What did you mean? Virgil Oldman: When simulating another's work the forger can't resist the temptation to put in something of himself. Often it's just a trifle, a detail of no ...


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