46

It's an example of 'negative space'. Mr Robot plays with this a lot, very effectively. It also uses a lot of lower quadrant framing & even adds to the negative space by removing the leading room in shots. Negative space, in short, is the space in a frame which 'is not the subject'. The subject is the positive space. Leading room is where, if a character ...


23

Late edit The OP's clarification means this takes an entirely different turn. The answer below is what the movie makers call these. A seller of 'imitation' objects would have to call them replicas, reproductions, models and miniatures. They could include the term icons, as in Flater's answer, or any terms that describes their purpose in-universe - but as ...


19

I would tend to think that something as iconic as the Death Star or the Millenium Falcon would deserve a better name If you're looking for a name for something that's iconic, it's (unsurprisingly) an icon, i.e. a well known symbol, emblem, or person that is idolized.


17

The hierarchy of production design, below the actual Director, of course, radiates outwards and downwards like a family tree with more branches and people the lower you go. At the top is the Production Designer. Below that both Art Director and Costume Designer. In some structures costume would be subordinate to both Art & Production, though some Costume ...


15

It is a cut with a newly shot Epilogue section I do not believe you could use the term 'remake', which implies an entirely (or almost entirely) re-shot movie. A remake can have different director, actors, script, and only loosely follow the same plot as the original. I do think a 'cut' is the right description in this case. According to articles that are ...


13

I agree with many of the already existing answers, but I would like to add a little more... In Star Wars' case The Death Star(s) can be seen as a an iconic visual prop (model, set piece), a character (because it has a distinct look/feel that helps shape both Star Wars aesthetically and because big events happen to main characters there, making it more than ...


12

These can be referred to as anthology episodes, in which the episode consists of several shorter, potentially unrelated stories. The stories are often connected by an overarching plot, setting, or theme, but there may be no in-universe reason why the stories are connected. Probably the most common structure is to tell 3 stories separated by 2 commercial ...


10

I think your question is combining two different perspectives. The word "prop" is a behind-the-scenes word. In the Thor movies, there are multiple props for his hammer; perhaps one for close-ups and one that's easy to wield. But it's one entity in the Marvel universe. "Character", on the other hand, is an analyzing-the-story word. Actors ...


6

Time magazine did a story about Michael J Fox appearing on the TV show Spin City. The essence of the article was that Fox understood what it meant to be a comedic actor, as opposed to the explosion of standup comedy based shows at the time whose principal actors were comedians, rather than comedic actors. Time called Fox's turn a relief and delight to ...


5

Roger Ebert in a review of The Naked Gun 33 1/3: It would be fatal to the movie if [Neilsen] ever betrayed the slightest suggestion that [he knew] funny things are going on. He doesn't know that his double entendres are double entendres, which makes them funny. So, broadly, a comic actor is someone who can play comedic characters well, while a comedian is ...


5

Out-of-universe, and from a commercial point of view, which seems to be what you're after, these objects can be described as props, memorabilia, collectibles, or models (as you yourself describe them :): The word prop usually refers to the real object used during filming. It is unique or has a very limited edition. 'Memorabilia' - in this context - is used ...


1

I'd describe a comedian as someone who tells jokes, and a comic as someone who could make you laugh without telling jokes. Like, you laughed at John Ritter's reactions to his roommates on Three's Company (did I just date myself?), and that would make him a Comic. You laugh at George Carlin's Seven Words You Can't Say On TV, and he's a Comedian. So there ...


1

A different angle suggests that "it depends." It may be "a prop" if it's one of several more-or-less identical items that are more-or-less interchangeable. In-universe examples might be light sabers, X-wing fighters --- even clone soldiers or slaves. It's not about who they are, but what they are. It may be "a character" if an ...


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