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13

This seems unlikely. The explanation for the cyanide scene is given right after, when it is explained as an elaborate test, orchestrated by whatever organization the protagonist is working under for the rest of the movie. The movie gives us little reason to doubt that explanation. Throughout the movie, we follow the timeline as it is experienced by the ...


13

Sator has a dead man's switch which will detonate the algorithm and reverse entropy, ending the world. Sator's dead man's switch by itself will not detonate the algorithm. It just sends out the location of the dead drop (the buried capsule). The people in the future (posterity) are expecting Sator to send them the location of the assembled algorithm (inside ...


12

There are two reasons for the Freeport raid. Firstly, as you have already highlighted, the Protagonist wishes to gain Kat's favour and trust by removing the fake Goya from the 'equation', allowing for not only an introduction to Sator but also in order to allow Kat to get Max and herself free from the situation. Secondly, the Protagonist is simply interested ...


11

Yes, from the observer's point of view, Sator would disappear. The observer 'continues' into the future, but inside the turnstile, Sator starts moving into the past. So he is no longer present in the observer's future. However from Sator's POV, the transition is smooth, as we have seen in the movie with Neil and the rest.


10

I believe the first part of your question (your assumption regarding the algorithm being delivered into the future) is correct. The answer saying otherwise is unsourced; let's explore an alternative approach. A Primer on Information (And Who Has It) It is important to recognize throughout the film that most characters, The Protagonist (TP) included, do not ...


10

If you take Sator's perspective, it is easier that way. Sator take his wife to his warehouse and beats on her. (shown to audience) Sator listens to his radio about how everything goes during the car chase scene, there are two Sator throughout the car chase scene, one inverted and one not; we are taking the non-inverted Sator's perspective. (happens off ...


10

Your impression is correct, it doesn't work. In the movie, reverse time has its own logic that is explained to some length. Many surprising events are a logic extrapolation of the consequences of time flowing in reverse. But it works only so far. It works long enough to enjoy the movie, but at some point it breaks down. There are a number of events that ...


8

Questions like this do touch the nerve of the film's logical consistency. In our normal, non-inverted timeflow, when you shoot a wall/glass, the resulting hole remains in it indefinitely and only gets worse with time. It will eventually get buried/destroyed after the building gets demolished. The hole will not magically self-heal / disappear. In Tenet's ...


8

Because he is inverted forward there again. Same as Kat. In Tenet, inverted characters have to breathe their own oxygen while traveling to the past. When, in the past, they find a turnstile and invert forward again, they can breathe normal oxygen again.


7

When the cavalry Niel called shows up in Tallinn and secures the turnstile after the Protagonist has completed the forward half of the chase, the commander—Ives—tells his deputy—Wheeler—to give the Protagonist the run down on inversion. In addition to needing his own air supply and bad handling when driving a car, if the Protagonist touches the forward ...


7

When you're in a military unit and you all have the same gear loaded onto trucks and stuff, it can be hard to pick out your green backpack from the other sometimes dozens of exact same bags, so you'd have a tag or trinket or marking that would individualize it. In terms of significance in the movie - it's just a nice way for the Protagonist and the audience ...


7

The gold remained inverted throughout, with the viewer needing to consider two points, one implied, the second specified within the script. The gold was still inverted when it was 'thrown' to The Protagonist. He appears to have deliberately mishandled it, believing that he has not yet had his cover blown to reveal his real role as a member of Tenet. When we ...


7

It is explained at some point that the scientist that created the turnstiles in the future also discovered a way to invert the entropy of the entire world's flow (the Algorithm), not only a few objects and people. As explained here, The effect of the Algorithm being activated would be mass annihilation. Every particle in the world would simultaneously be ...


5

Sator didn't really "vanish." This apparent discrepancy in his timeline is explained by the dialogue among the Protagonist, Neil and Kat as they were discussing when and where Sator could be: Neil: He gets to choose the time and place for the end of the world. What moment? What does he choose? Protagonist: [To Kat] You told me about a holiday ...


5

I read the theory of that Neil is moving backwards throughout the film, but not sure if that is accurate. What I think it really is, that He was not moving backwards throughout the film events as we see him, but he already moved backwards all the way to the point where he saved the protagonist at the opera, then inverted back to the normal timeline, then we ...


5

I struggled with this as it seemed to be a temporal loophole but I think there is an answer - which lies at the end if you don't care for the details. Examining the relevant scenes of the film, this is what seems to be happening. In Tallin: Regular - We see regular Kat being dragged into the see-through room while a bullethole is on the separating glass. ...


5

MovieMe's answer is correct, but there is another big aspect to it as well. Basically the entirety of Tenet's plan is about making Sator believe that he's won. The idea is that if Sator didn't get the last piece of the algorithm then he'd continue trying to get it, and since he has basically infinite resources being sent to him from the future it's likely ...


5

The most simple explanation is that Neil inverted himself using the local turnstile before waiting for the tunnel to 'un' collapse. Once he had gone back far enough he would have been able to use his knowledge of the battlefield to covertly position himself in such manner that would allow him to simply close the door on The Protagonist at the right moment (...


4

Priya was not helping Sator. The reason she wanted The Protagonist to get the algorithm and lose it is because Sator has all the other 8 parts. No one is able to locate these other 8 parts. The team gains access to only one of the parts at the Kiev Opera. They realize that only when Sator gets the final part, will he expose the location of the algorithm as ...


4

The in-universe explanation is that traces of all interactions between inverted and regular objects were always present in our universe. What has happened - happened. So as soon as the glass was made it was already cracked, although the cracks were microscopic. Then they would grow larger and larger until they form a complete bullet hole at some time prior ...


4

The "dead man's switch" (Sator's fitness tracker) is not connected to the time bomb in the hypocentre: NEIL Not with a dead man’s switch. KAT A what? PROTAGONIST That fitness tracker he wears... KAT He’s obsessive about his health. NEIL It’ll be linked to a switch. Probably a simple email burst, revealing the location of the dead drop, set to ...


4

The mystery is solved, at least as far as the Saab is concerned. There's a car in the red (non-inverted) side of the turnstyle facility at the end of the car chase. We never get a good look at it, but it has the right shape and the right hub-caps to be the same Saab that we see in the car chase sequence. (At around the time of this shot, the inverted version ...


4

Inverted Neil needs to close the door, so that they are opened from Protagonist's perspective. Neil realises that protagonist and Ives won't be able to open the door, so he know he must help them ("I’m the only one who could’ve got that door open in time, right Ives?"). Tenet's universe seems to obey some sort of Novikov self-consistency principle (...


4

The case the movie seems to make (through Neil) is that it's unknowable what would actually happen, but that people in the future (the ones directing Andrei Sator, at least) believe that it would work out for them (or are willing to risk it). NEIL The classic thought experiment – if you went back in time and killed your own grandfather, how could you have ...


3

You're right, they don't show the inversion between the Protagonist meeting Priya and the assault team on the ship. But we later see that they have turnstiles on the ship, so they probably used those same turnstiles to invert the team so they could travel back the two weeks needed.


3

We do actually see this in the movie at least once, but in reverse: the first time we see a turnstile in operation, two black-clad figures suddenly walk out of it, even though it was empty before. These later turn out to be two copies of the protagonist, one travelling backwards in time and the other forward. I'm not sure but I think later we also see it ...


3

I don't think it's either about developing strategy on how to infiltrate Sanjay Singh's house or how will protagonist treat Kat or Max, as we know later on that Neil knows the protagonist from his past. I think it's about building the rapport when you meet first time. It also maybe to exhibit the extent Neil is willing to go through to accomplish the mission ...


3

Yes, we can conclude that the bullet was inverted from the reverse effect it has before/after(?!) impacting the wall. Were Neil inverted no more explanation would be required, but he appears to be moving normally; a viable course of events is that, after (in his un-inverted perspective) Neil leaves the opera, he then removes the magazine from his pistol and ...


3

Your assumption that, Supposedly dropping it inside would be a way to deliver the Algorithm into the future and thus allowing humanity of the future to reverse entropy, destroying the past. is wrong. Sator did not intend to keep the Algorithm in time capsule for the folks in the future to discover it. He was going to detonate the Algorithm after enjoying ...


3

Both bullets fired by Volkov are normal (un-inverted). Inverted bullets are not required to shoot inverted individuals; from an inverted person's perspective, being shot with a normal bullet is equivalent to a normal (un-inverted) person being shot with an inverted bullet, which is shown in the film to result in equivalent penetrating trauma (not counting ...


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