38

Someone might be able to find specific info for Star Trek, but there is no general rule in the industry. Scenes are rarely shot in order. They are shot according to actor and set/location availability. If they have to build some special set to be an alien ship's bridge for just one episode, they'll shoot everything they can on it so they can break it down ...


9

How do you confuse a scenario that is clearly the invention of a character with a real episode? Following Pete's speculation that the transporter on the Enterprise essentially killed and then created a "color Xerox" of everyone it beamed up or out, Badger launches into his greatest monologue of the series: a detailed description of his own (...


8

According to StarTrek.com it's cryogenic fog from the cryogenic surgery https://www.startrek.com/article/your-tos-questions-answered Question: In “Journey to Babel,” Sarek (Mark Lenard) becomes critically ill while being transported on the Enterprise and, according to Mr. Spock, needs a “serogenic” surgical procedure on his heart to repair it. What’s a ...


5

Khan wanted the Enterprise intact. He was hoping that Kirk would rather give the ship up than see it potentially destroyed in the Nebula. The purpose of the warning shot was to let Kirk know they would further engage if he kept running. Obviously, it didn't work. Primarily because there was no way that Kirk was going to give up his ship.


5

A competitor of sorts to Star Trek, Babylon 5, did some amount of this. There were always significant cost pressures, and so one of the things they did was plot out when different sets would be needed, and actors, and so on, so that they could use actors and sets in parallel. They even did this across episodes, so an actor might be filming one episode one ...


4

The only answer is, it's unknown. During the course of Star Trek's TV shows and movies, they encountered many life forms and races. Some, like the Klingons, Vulcans and Romulans, became integral parts of the show and characters from those races were frequently encountered. Others, such as The Metrons, The Capellans and VGER slipped into obscurity, never ...


4

In the television world, Star Trek is what is known as a "single camera" show. There is literally just one camera, and there will only be one scene filmed at a time. But ironically, even if it were a "multi-camera" show, there would still only be one scene shot at a time, so industry terminology might not be very helpful here. The primary ...


2

Just a side note: the per-episode budget decreased with each season. This may explain why by Season 3, transporter scenes almost always showed just Kirk, Spock, and McCoy beaming down to a planet. This helped save money on the transporter special effects by not having additional officers/crew beaming down. I also believe that as a cost-saving measure, there ...


1

As a teen I was an extra on an episode of a popular fantasy show shot in New Zealand. The process was quite interesting, especially as a fan of the show. This show used a second unit to film distant, static and filler shots using body doubles, often at the same time the main unit was shooting close-ups and walking shots on the main cast. I watched a bit of ...


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