38

Data and Tasha Yar had a drug fueled liaison during season 1 of TNG, The Naked Now. It was never spoken of again, but referenced in Season 2 Measure of a Man. Season 1 was 2364-2365, First Contact was 2373. Roughly 8 and a half years later. Ergo, he's taking about Natasha. If Data wasn't incapable of being robotically precise, his keeping to the second ...


19

In the Season 2 episode The Measure Of A Man, we learn that Picard had been brought to a court martial over the loss of the Stargazer, but that he was absolved of any and all charges brought at that time. So, he was briefly in trouble - but not in a career limiting way. From the TV shows and movies, we don't have any clear indication of what Picard did ...


16

More details than you could possibly want are available at Memory Alpha. In 2370, cadet Crusher resigned from Starfleet Academy after The Traveler - posing as a villager on Dorvan V - guided him through a vision of his deceased father who told him that his destiny lay somewhere other than with Starfleet and that he should not follow in his ...


14

This drastic change in appearance for Klingons was a bit of a running joke among fans during later series of Star Trek. The writers even acknowledged it during an episode of Deep Space Nine which sees Worf, among others, time-travel back into the original series episode The Trouble with Tribbles. When asked why those Klingons looked funny he curtly replies ...


11

From Memory Beta, the database for all licensed Star Trek works (including e.g. novels, comic books, video games,...): in 2373 Wesley altered history by erasing the Maquis, and instead created a short border war between the Federation and the Cardassian Union. (Short Story: Gods, Fate and Fractals) Around the end of the Dominion War, Wesley ...


11

As explained on the Sci-Fi SE: Out-of-universe, according to some recent reports, there was some sort of problem between Gates McFadden and producer/writer Maurice Hurley. I've heard this characterized in some places as sexual harassment, but I'm not sure that's based on any actual allegations. Rick Berman did say he was at the center of it, though: ...


10

Well first if we discount the Borg updating their shields to stop swords (and I'm not suggesting they couldn't do this!) And the if we discount them just shooting their attackers with energy weapons before they get close enough to use swords (which I don't see any reason we should!) Then as soon as they start allowing themselves to get attacked by an enemy ...


10

There is no published in or out of universe explanation about Guinan/her people and Q/the Q. It was never expanded on in the show, movies, in canon or non-canon books or video games, or any of the released production notes or interviews. Given how extensive the information we have about TNG and star trek in general, compared to other shows, that's very ...


9

The "appliance" (which you could have bought at auction for $2000) was glued directly onto the actor's head and blended in with makeup. The outer edges of the 'brain' appear to be sprayed a slightly darker colour to give a false impression of greater depth and shadow.


8

The poker games in TNG were friendly games between officers, with no actual wages. Not even a shift change was at stake, as no one was over worked or lazy. The wages were tokens and the winner just got bragging rights till next game. Just a way to relieve stress and get closer to their peers. In line with Roddenberry vision of the future. Voyager was ...


8

I never fully understood that episode but from reading in Memory Alpha, Picard is recovering from his assimilation with the Borg. The vacation on Earth is about Picard reconnecting with his family, his past and his traditions. I believe René initially made a mistake and Picard jokingly accepted him as his Uncle. René must have realized his mistake when he ...


7

The episode in question , "All Good Things" (TNG: S7E25) is actually based in an alternative universe. Warp factors above 10 do not exist according to 24th Century Warp Theory as "Warp Factor 10" is interpreted as "Infinite Velocity". It is important to note the differences between the earlier Star Trek material and the later material. Many episodes in The ...


7

Worf is a very strong, experienced melee combatant with years of training with melee weapons. His weapon is heavier than a sword and seems to work almost by percussive smashing and piecing rather than slashing, however let us assume they replicate weapons which have the same physical characteristics for our humans. Imagine what would happen if there was a ...


7

Yes, DVD versions of shows can often differ--sometimes drastically--from the original broadcast version, as can syndicated broadcasts. Whether they'll include additional material or exclude original material all depends. Most often, material is cut simply for time on broadcast. In syndication runs, more ad revenue may need to be generated, so more time is ...


7

The main difference between Mudd-Androids and Soong-Androids is that Mudd-Androids were created by a long dead alien race in the Andromeda galaxy, while Soong-Androids were the first real human built, and seemingly sentient Androids. The Mudd-Androids were not really Sentient. Just like any other technology in Star Trek, humans were rarely the first to ...


6

The original explanations were: They Always looked like that, the budget just didn't allow it. Don't pay attention to the man behind the curtain: Gene Roddenberry tried to explain the differences between The Motion Picture's Klingons and the original ones by saying that the original show had simply never had the budget and makeup technology to envision ...


6

Here is an interview with Michael Dorn on TrekNews. He opens with the line "It was just a backstory." Which maybe means it wasn't intended to be long term. Can you talk about some of the factors that led to you joining the cast at that time? Dorn: It was just a backstory. We [Star Trek: The Next Generation] ended in ’94 and we did a movie real ...


5

The Ambassador is, well, an ambassador, a high ranking legal agent of the government acting as part of its diplomatic interest. Worf is a person of interest due to his position as a high ranking national in the military service on the flagship of an equally powerful and competing foreign power. A power that the Klingon Empire has contentious dealings with ...


5

This has been answered in some detail on SFF. The answer references the Memory-Alpha wiki for All Good Things … where the following is noted: It is clear that there is no more warp 10 limit in the future. This limit was set in "Force of Nature". In addition, ships in the future timeline are able to go above Warp 13. This would appear to contradict "...


4

For a long time, it was acknowledged but rather explicitly 'not discussed with outsiders.' It was later addressed in Enterprise as the result of a widespread attempt at genetic engineering - the subjects took on human characteristics and were sent to serve on the front lines of the Klingon Defense Forces circa-TOS, ...


4

There isn't a specific trope for something like this besides maybe "The Show must go on", So I will call it, The Plot Must go on! If the Borg just blew up/killed/assimilated everyone on board, there wouldn't be a show. The reasoning for the Borg to take Picard was to use him as a spokesperson when dealing with humanity and the Federation and getting ...


4

Why writing changes . . . I could almost write a novel, but the Klingon Warrior race was implied in TOS, at least once. It's true that mostly they were just "the enemy" and there was little examination into their society or beliefs, but in the episode Friday's Child, some of the Klingon views were made clear. Kras, the Klingon, said to Teer, the leader of ...


4

I would argue that this didn't happen. Aside from Worf, many of the Klingons we see aren't really that honorable. They're short-sighted, violent, dishonest, and stupid. Worf, on the other hand, learned to be a Klingon from books. He turned himself into the Klingon ideal, not knowing that real Klingons don't often behave that way.


4

It's standard notation for scripts to capitalize important props, so I'm not sure that upper or lower case in the script has any special significance, even if a contrived acronym was created before or after the script was written. Longshank's answer seems to follow the script-writing convention that important plot and prop items are capitalized in scripts. ...


3

There are what appear to be shooting scripts for TNG episodes here: Star Trek Minutiae The script for season 1, episode 4 "Code of Honor" contains the first mention of VISOR I could find, written as all capitals: ACT FOUR FADE IN: 47 INT. ENTERPRISE - GEORDI'S QUARTERS Geordi is standing alone in his room, ...


3

Clearly there would have been some form of official announcement/denouncement of the event so that Worf could be 'ignored' by the rest of Klingon society. The discommendation is a pretty severe legal penalty and if you don't tell people about it how would they know? A sort of "From this day forward, let it be known.." type of thing by the Klingon judicial ...


2

The main difference between Mudd-Androids and Soong-Androids is that Mudd-Androids were created by a long dead alien race in the Andromeda galaxy, while Soong-Androids were the first real human built, and seemingly sentient Androids. Not true. In the Star Trek episode "Requiem For Methuselah", Captain Kirk encountered an android far more human than "...


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