46

I have watched all of Stanley Kubrick's movies. He wants you to know that he's in control of the pace of the movie. You'll be fed each line when he's ready to feed it to you. All of Kubrick's movies tend to have a lot of white space, empty space where no one is doing or saying anything; they are merely existing. Listen to the non-human pace of Nicole Kidman'...


26

I think there are five related and self-reenforcing effects that the pacing in 2001 has. The first two are related to Kubrick's general intentions to make an artistic film; the others are related more specifically to the story and how Kubrick crafted it. It impresses upon the audience the scale of the action -- what Kubrick called "the grandeur of space" (...


16

From my perspective, it's partly to contrast HAL's childlike behavior and to also show human evolution from apes to logical beings.


13

TL;DR: Kubrick wanted fans who really desired its meaning to either interpret their own meaning from the film, or read Burgess' book to derive the meaning the author intended. Long Answer: In an article with the New Yorker, Anthony Burgess, the author of A Clockwork Orange described how the name came to him: I first heard the expression “as queer as a ...


13

After being released, he is attacked by vagrants. I believe that if he was faking, he would have defended himself. Instead, two bobbies come along and save him. They turn out to be his old "droogs" Dim and Georgie who then also beat him up. I believe that if he was faking then he would have tried to protect himself.


11

At first I thought it might have been a breakaway model, used by the likes of Orsen Welles to make a camera appear to pass through a neon sign or window in Citizen Kane, but then I watched the clip and realized this could not be the case. I have had some experience with motion control cameras, and this certainly seems to have been produced using a track ...


11

From Interview with Stanley Kubrick regarding A Clockwork Orange by Philip Strick & Penelope Houston (Sight&Sound, Spring 1972): Question: To what extent do you rationalise a shot before setting it up? Kubrick: There are certain aspects of a film which can meaningfully be talked about, but photography and editing do not lend themselves to ...


10

They are two different people, though admittedly they do look somewhat similar and you don't see them both very clearly for very long. The scene follows the crew member in the uniform as he climbs down, gets his food and joins the crew member who is in the robe watching the BBC on a tablet device. They sit at different ends of the table. You can see them ...


10

According to IMDb, he did not have to hold his breath. They used an oxygen tank: In the Warner Brothers DVD, McDowell does a commentary track and talks about how he used an oxygen tank while he was under the water. He never mentions that it failed or that he almost drowned. Also on one of the documentaries on the DVD, the commentator mentions that ...


10

Best reference to this is essentially the interview you talked about: "People pretend to think they know Stanley Kubrick, and think they know me, when most of them don't know either of us," Spielberg told film critic Joe Leydon in 2002. "And what's really funny about that is, all the parts of A.I. that people assume were Stanley's were mine. And all the ...


10

One of the things I found interesting about the entire sequence in the Discovery is a sort of reversing: Bowman and Poole behave coldly, don't give in to emotions and seem--at least emotionally--always in control of the situation. HAL, on the other hand, is the one that cracks under pressure and panicks. So, of all the crew, HAL is the real human character.


9

If he was faking about being "cured" and being non-violent, was he also faking about Beethoven music making him ill? Because that drove him so mad he attempted suicide by jumping out a window, seriously injuring himself. I think if he had been faking his cure he would not have gone to such extreme lengths to prove it. Also, as I mentioned in commenting on ...


9

It can be argued that Joker is the main character since he narrates the film and it basically follows his experiences. During the time period depicted (1967-68) soldiers were commonly sent directly from boot camp to assignments within Vietnam. In the film, all of the characters who were training at the bootcamp get their MOS assignments (Joker gets Military ...


9

Seems like it's supposed to be a spy camera. It was a common trope in the 60s that a camera could be hidden in a watch or similar small object. Note the shutter click noise when he pushes the lever, and then turns the knob to advance the film. I found some discussion on The Straight Dope Message Board as to why he would do that. A common opinion is that ...


8

I don’t think Joker completely buys into the military mind-set the way the others do, so it not very likely he will talk about boot-camp with other members of his graduating class when he runs into them. I don’t know what basic training is like now, but when I went through it (early 70’s) it was no high school that one might sit around reminiscing about for ...


7

It's explained in the Dr. Strangelove's explanation: The whole point of the doomsday machine is lost if you keep it a secret Then the General says Gee, I wish we had one of them doomsday machines The whole joke is that you don't need to create such machine. You just must be capable of this and then tell that you have it. Hence NYT. But the ...


6

A brief summary of Stanley Kubrick's Films: Sparatcus (1960) Nominated for 6 Academy awards, winner of 4. 96% on Rotten Tomatoes Lolita (1962) 4 Golden Globe award nominations 1 BAFTA award nomination 1 Academy award nomination 95% on Rotten Tomatoes Dr. Strangelove (1964) 99% on Rotten Tomatoes 4 Academy award nominations 7 BAFTA award nomibations (4 ...


5

Kubrick was going for as much verisimilitude as he could get out of the various space scenes. Space is a vacuum - there is no medium for sound - so Kubrick shot these scenes with no sound except for the sound of David breathing inside his suit. As for the lingering and slow paced shots - despite the fact that you're in orbit and therefore travelling at ...


5

I'm of the opinion Kubrick changed the story so that in the movie, Alex was faking that the conditioning worked. Basically I was convinced by the case made by this analysis from a guy named Rob Ager. Here's a key excerpt: In the book Alex spouts his own objection as the preacher and Minister debate the morality of the Ludovico technique, “Me, me, me. ...


5

Few if any directors controlled their sets, props, lighting and cameras like Kubrick - I honestly don't think anyone would be allowed to do that to the extents he went to on a modern film. Watch 'Room 237' about the making of 'The Shining' - you'll see some real precision and use of visual metaphor at work.


2

In the book, Alex is hooked up to a brain monitor and his brain's activity is watched. The people conducting the experiment can see clearly that he is having a response to the treatment. You may be able to trick people but not a brain monitor.


2

His wife found where he had hidden it and wondered about it and had placed it on the bed before falling asleep. She knows something strange is going on, and now he knows that she knows, which is why he breaks down and confesses everything.


1

I'd interpret this scene as Ullman acting as an agent of the Overlook hotel in order to get Danny back. The whole Shining - both the book and the movie - is about the evil hotel trying to use the supernatural qualities of Danny - something that Hallorann called "shining" - in order to multiply its own powers of evil. Now that Danny (and his mother) got ...


1

I think that Alex maybe was faking his aversion to sex and violence, but he was NOT faking his aversion to the 9th. There wouldn't be any need for him to fake it, for a start. Aversion therapy has been used in the past but the results were mixed at best, and Alex being conditioned against the 9th clearly wasn't part of the plan. The newspapers had proclaimed ...


1

I thought Alex was faking his cure, but I thought his sickness was real when he heard the 9th. I believe Alex was faking because before he signed up for the treatment he was the model prisoner, and wanted out, even if it meant he would have to stop his violence. I also think the fake burp is very note worthy, as well as the minister choosing Alex because ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible