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The answer is that usually the director had no say over the music score and if you saw a movie in two different theaters you would hear two different music scores. There are exceptions though. In 1915, director D. W. Griffith hired Joseph Carl Breil to write a score for his epic but racist film Birth of a Nation. Many times, studios would commission a ...


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Generally, yes Instead of having spoken dialogue and background music synched to a film like you see today, silent films had a particular style of sound accompanying the motion pictures. The earlier silent films were accompanied by a phonograph recording or, more commonly, live music, such as a guitarist or pianist. Just like contemporary film, music was ...


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Sometimes the reverse can happen to where the director is happy with the singing performance but not with the acting performance. Nightmare Before Christmas comes to mind. Danny Elfman the composer wanted to play Jack and Tim Burton was very happy with his singing but didn't feel the dialogue was flowing well so he kept Elfman as the singing voice, but ...


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The major factor will be whether the director is happy with the voice actor's singing voice. Speaking lines of dialogue and singing songs are two different skill sets and people who are good at one are not always so good at the other. Two examples from Disney would be the characters Jasmine and Mulan. Linda Larkin voiced Jasmine and in most critics' opinion, ...


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