86

In the continuation of this scene, Dr Jeremiah explains that difference: Dr Jeremiah: No assumption. Not at all. you misunderstand me, I said you are men of violence I'm not accusing you of being violent man It's quite different Please, please, edify us, Doc. You both served overseas Not much of a stretch, Doc. for all you know, we were ...


63

To Live as a Monster If he accepts his guilt and becomes sane he will become the Monster. His delusions are his brains way of removing this guilt and hiding the fact that he ignored his family, did not act on his wife's mental illness, allowed her to murder their children and then murdered her. By accepting what the doctors are telling him he will need to ...


24

In the initial story, the suspense novel, it was wholly intended that Daniels is crazy. I think it was Scorsese's creative input that made the film what it was. In the film, both possibilities are equally possible. Again, this is not the original intent of the story, but an artistic change in the film. He's crazy: (Dr. Cawley explains that patients were ...


13

Both cases are Teddy, himself, and he lives this duality. In one case, if he acknowledges he is the killer of his wife (and indirectly his children because he was away so long and often he never noticed his wife's depression), he is the 'Monster', but he can continue to live here on the island in peace, since he will accept the lobotomy. If he refuses to ...


12

I'm still digging for better sources (specifically something directly quoting Marin Scorsese), but from what I've found so far: The bandage was very much intentional and used to symbolize Teddy Daniels'/ Andrew Laeddis' fractured psyche and amnesia. Taken from http://imatrix.wikia.com/wiki/Shutter_Island Martin Scorsese is notorious for bringing in patterns ...


11

In this great article, that also takes into account details from the book, the following information can be found: Doctors Cawey and Sheehan wait for a storm to start the roleplay They use large amount of psychotropic drugs to put Teddy to sleep Teddy awakens on the ferry This means that after drugging him they put him on a ferry, move away from the shore ...


8

I've just answered this question where I gave my own take on events, so I'll repeat some parts of it here as hopefully it can provide some form of an answer. Paraphrasing from the previous answer: Andrew Laeddis fought during the war and returned home as a war hero to his wife, Dolores, and his kids. However, his wife Dolores was mentally unbalanced. ...


7

He is crazy. I really wonder how people can see this as an 'implanted memories'-game. The character Leonarde portrays is obviously 'realizing' stuff and the moment you're rewatching this movie, you actually see all these hints in the rest of the patients that show they have trouble playing along with 'yet another' attempt to heal him. They are obviously ...


6

This scene is of course one of Teddy's hallucinations, but I would try to answer your questions in order. What were the rats eating? They weren't shown to "eat anything" here. I do have a part of the original script written by Laeta Kalogridis where she mentions quite a bit about the rats but she doesn't say anything about them "eating anything", as this ...


6

Summary: Timeline?: After World War 2 (1954). Why does he dream of World War 2?: He was there. Detailed: There is some serious debate still raging in many deep, dark corners of the Internet about exactly what happened in the film. This is my take on events. Some of this is clearly true, whilst other bits are just opinion: Andrew Laeddis fought during ...


6

After understanding his last statement "Which would be worse? To live as a monster, or die as a good man?" It is clear that he knows his true identity now but he thinks he live like a monster and now wanted to be free of it and to get lobotomize. So he faked his craziness.


5

Teddy is sitting on the staircase when Chuck arrived and then sat beside him. Get his cigarette offered him then both start smoke. Chuck starts a conversation with him by asking "so boss what now?" Chuck was about to test his patient by pretending again to be his partner. This is I think a usual way to monitor a patient with mental illness. I think Teddy ...


5

My answer is just the opinion of me, and not based on hard proof. That said, I think Teddy was really cured, but he just pretended that he was still investigating the case. That way, he wouldn't get arrested for killing his wife and could just "role-play" his life again and again without arousing any suspicion. For your second question, I think Teddy just ...


4

The whole water scene was planned. If you watch Mark Rufalo as he goes to fill the cup, he's watching Teddy and the woman the whole time. He doesn't fill up the cup, but he pretends too. That whole scene was planned, for Leo's character. The woman writing Run, was already planned. Everything was planned for DiCaprio. The whole movie is a complex role play to ...


3

He has been sane the entire time. He is accompanied by a new partner (which is suspect) and has migraines due to his PTSD from his experience in world war two. He is given psych meds from the institution which is a US experimental psych ward carried over from Nazi scientists. At the end he accepts his lobotomy because he would rather live than to die a sane ...


2

This film, and the novel it's based on by Dennis Lehane would be classified as a Psychological Thriller with a touch of psychological horror. It's in line with films like, Psycho, Vertigo, The Shining, Gone Girl, Hannibal Lecter Franchise, Memento, The Prestige, or The Sixth Sense. All of these films rely on a character driven story that then has major ...


2

As far as I know, if you commit some crime and are found mentally ill, you do not go to jail. Instead you go to a mental hospital, where you are treated until you are fine. Then you are free. Hence the whole "pleading insanity" option in various movies/tv shows. It would not make sense to stay 3 years in a hospital and then also get the full sentence. This ...


2

On a very deep level he might know he is crazy and know what really happened but he has convinced himself that his alternate story is real. He cannot face what actually happened and would rather live his life in the different story. By the end of the film it is clear that he is unable/unwilling to comprehend reality no matter how hard the doctors try to ...


2

I would say this is something similar to "Catch 22". Billings is insane but his knowledge of the "outside" reality prove he is sane. But at the same time his grasp make him fear the world while in the hospital he feel safe. Also the hydrogen bomb may seems to be "ad infinitium" weapon as hydrogen is everywhere in the air so "to the thousandth, the millionth ...


2

Three children. The two questions you quoted were both answered by me. Answering the question in the first link you posted, I quoted from the second link you posted. The original asker in that question had mentioned two children and I rather mistakenly continued from this mistake and answered referring to two children instead of three. It is three children,...


1

As you can see from the image gallery when searching "Lighthouse Interior", there are many which share the same staircase feature. https://www.google.com/search?q=lighthouse+interior&rlz=1C1AOHY_enUS821US821&sxsrf=ALeKk03Zlk4CcMftzYhjJ21bWejIYcs61A:1585662024452&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=...


1

It is nothing more than just the name of the island where the story takes place - Shutter Island (in Boston harbour). The island is fictional; Dennis Lehane (the author of the Shutter Island novel, on which the film is based) was inspired by the hospital and grounds on Long Island in Boston Harbor.


1

Personally, after watching it, and now reading these things...no one is even bothering to take in the possibility of everyone framing him, that he was right, and he wasn't for 2 years in that place at all, and whatever happened might as well be real as it can get and not a false reality that Daniels created, which, in my opinion, he didn't created. They ...


1

I choose to believe that he has false memories of Dachau as he views the actions being performed there as particularly horrific. Therefore, they fit his own emotions perfectly - he thinks of himself as a monster, so imagines he took place in these monstrous events. To confirm that he has false memories I noticed that the concentration camp that ...


1

Dr. Cawley was attempting the role play exercise in an attempt to bring Andrew back to reality. The experimental treatment was an alternative to the conventional treatment of lobotomy. Cawley indicated that if the role play treatment did not work on this final attempt, he would have no choice but to follow a standard treatment. At the end of the scene, ...


1

This movie is classified as neo-noir genre by wikipedia. Neo-noir movies are defined as Movies in which characters were often conflicted antiheroes, trapped in a difficult situation and making choices out of desperation or nihilistic moral systems. This clearly suites the movie's plot. Now spoiler alert (in reverse order) Edward "Teddy" Daniels (aka: ...


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