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65

His official position is never stated, either in the TV series or the canon Doyle stories. Essentially, in the TV series, he is a troubleshooter for the British establishment granted (or assuming) great powers and abilities. In line with the the Doyle stories, he is referred to by Sherlock as follows: "He is the British Government – when he's not too ...


46

It's not a real film. It's a fictional 'classic' noir film made for this show. If you look them up on IMDb, the actors playing 'Leonard' and 'Velma' in that movie are contemporary actors and started acting in 2004 and 2006, respectively (and they don't play these characters anywhere else).


44

Yes. To quote from The Independent about the source of mind palaces: As it turns out, memory palaces like Holmes’ are a real thing, and have been for thousands of years. It all began with a lucky escape from a collapsing banquet hall by the Ancient Greek poet Simonides, who realised that by visualizing the room where the accident happened, he ...


41

It's actually quite a simple, albeit far-fetched ending. Firstly, Dr. Watson comes into the apartment with the phone. Sherlock asks for it and this conversation occurs: JOHN: Did she ever text you again, after ... all that? SHERLOCK: Once, a few months ago. JOHN: What did she say? SHERLOCK: “Goodbye, Mr. Holmes.” This obviously implies that ...


40

He usually asks people's employment longevity when they have criticised or questioned something he has done or when they refuse to immediately do something he has requested. The way he asks often hints at some sort of subtle threat to their future employment (he seems to be insinuating that it would be a pity if that turned out to be their full longevity at ...


36

Yes, he's certainly referencing Mr. Spock - everyone's favorite Vulcan science officer. In the Star Trek TV show (and on film) Spock constantly struggled with his emotions due to his mixed blood, and sometimes had a hard time suppressing them. Watson is likening Sherlock's own 'emotional struggle' (albeit brief) to this classic character.


36

I will try to stay away from what Christian has already posted which already is a great answer. I can answer this from a reader's perspective. Sherlock holmes stories by Doyle can be classified into Long stories and short stories. There are only 4 long stories of which 2 of them are already made into episodes two of them which haven't made it into episodes ...


34

The long coat, the scarf, the shoes, the curly hair, the high cheekbones Molly's fiancé Tom clearly resembles someone ...   Tom         Sherlock    


32

It's because of scheduling. When you have two leads who are also featuring in major films like The Hobbit... (together!) and Star Trek plus having writers and producers who are involved in a variety of projects, it's difficult to get everyone in the same place at the same time to make a show... particularly if you want to maintain the quality of the show at ...


32

It was answered in the first episode A Study in Pink only, here is that conversation: Dr John Watson: He's your brother? Sherlock Holmes: Of course he's my brother. Dr John Watson: So he's not... Sherlock Holmes: Not what? Dr John Watson: I don't know... criminal mastermind? Sherlock Holmes: Close enough. Mycroft Holmes: For ...


31

He jumped into the truck which was in front of the pavement and drove off as soon as he pushed a body out wearing his clothes or he landed in the truck and then rolled from the truck to the pavement. Remember how he told Watson exactly where to stand? (to make sure he could only see from the correct angle) Watson was delayed by a bicycle hitting him as he ...


30

As each occurrence happened when a member of staff was trying to restrain him or not bend to his will, I believe it was simply his not-so-subtle way of reminding them that he had the power to remove them from their jobs at his whim, should they question his actions again: With the nurse: Um, Mr Smith, I'm just wondering, maybe this isn't a suitable ...


29

You've already stated the fact British shows tend to have fewer episodes than their American counterparts (see here for a great explanation). However, there are a few other things to consider when discussing Sherlock. From a Digital Spy article: "[The format is] very closely held," [PBS Executive] Eaton told Collider. "Steven [Moffat] crafts them, and ...


28

In the TV Series, Sherlock calls himself a Consulting Detective. Whilst it is not completely certain that this involves payment, it is certainly conventional for you to pay a consultant in any sphere. Watson is also involved, and spends some of his time blogging about Shelock's successes, presumably not just to enhance his reputation but to 'improve sales' ...


27

There is mention of another brother Sherrinford Holmes on wikipedia: Sherrinford Holmes is a hypothetical elder brother of Sherlock Holmes and Mycroft Holmes. It is believed that his deduction skills exceed those of both his younger brothers. His name is taken from early notes as one of those considered by Arthur Conan Doyle for his detective hero before ...


27

While the medical use of the terms are interchangeable, most people in common language use them differently: psychopath - a berserker who has gone crazy and is running around killing people, smashing stuff etc. Think "psychotic" for the mental image sociopath - someone who really doesn't care about society's norms, such as not killing or hurting other ...


27

The UK’s usage of the metric system is a mixed bag. Here’s a somewhat brief overview: Travel Large distances are measured in miles, with yards for shorter ones Speed is miles per hour, or mph Fuel is purchased in litres Fuel efficiency is measured in miles per gallon (1), or mpg The space within a car will be given in litres Around the home Weather is ...


26

While Irene was very distracting and a great match for Sherlock in general this only hinders his deduction ability so much. With Irene's display to Sherlock he can then continue in the back of his mind to try to figure out what series of numbers would be important enough to her to use as a combination. Counting on the fact that she wouldn't use a random ...


25

It is a very exclusive part of London, part of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. It is named after Belgrave Square, which today includes many international embassies to the UK. It was used as an alternative UK based location for the original Arthur Conan Doyle story which was A Scandal in Bohemia. Belgravia was probably chosen because of the ...


25

If Sherlock shot Moriarty, then the snipers would kill him and Watson, end of story. If he shoots the bomb, there's a chance they all die, but there's also a chance to create enough of a mess to be able to escape. If the bomb exploded, the snipers wouldn't try to shoot, since they'd risk harming Moriarty. So detonating the bomb was the best option. To ...


25

To quote co-creator Steven Moffat (February 2014): We deal with scheduling. I’ve also got to do 'Doctor Who'. I’ve got no choice about that. That’s the day job. Everyone is a little bit busy. ... If we made 'Sherlock' the ordinary way, and did a run of 6 or 12, it would have been over by now. It would have been done because Martin [Freeman] and ...


24

When Sherlock says "This is low tar", Mycroft replies "Well, you barely knew her". This reenforces the idea that the cigarette is a way of coping with the loss - he didn't know her that well, so he doesn't need a strong cigarette.


24

When a woman has clothes made, the tailor generally needs her measurements - the distance around in inches at chest, waist and hips. These three numbers made up the combination. Apparently, Irene Adler's measurements are 32-24-34 according to random websites.


24

Vatican cameos! It's pretty hard to find a definitive answer, but it looks like it is code for "Duck!". And it's aimed only at Watson as he's the only one to react at the phrase. Conan Doyle makes a reference about in "The Hound of the Baskervilles". (source) I was exceedingly preoccupied by that little affair of the Vatican cameos, and in my anxiety ...


24

I am not sure that it is based on a specific event but 1972 was a very tense year in the British government: 2 separate states of emergency were declared due to striking Bloody Sunday The British Embassy in Ireland was burned down There was a very violent protest in Derry Aldershot was bombed with several people killed 2 British ships were sunk by ...


23

I theorize that Sherlock JUST DID JUMP (1). He did, however, have a means of breaking the fall presumably by the exact same means that helped one of the CIA operatives survive in 'A Scandal in Belgravia'. If you recall, Sherlock was asked on the phone by Lestrade: LESTRADE: And exactly how many times did he fall out the window? SHERLOCK: It’s all a ...


22

The ash knowledge is a reference to the classic Sherlock Holmes from the novels. The punch is for being drunk and obnoxious. Spark Notes have an article on classic Sherlock Holmes references, and they have a small section that covers the ash discussion perfectly, so I'll quote it in its entirety: During a particularly memorable scene in [The Sign of ...


22

Arrogant, not Amateur. A.G.R.A were at the top of their game and had complete trust in each other; which held out, as they were betrayed by an external source that was itself a mole within an official entity. Whilst the flash drives could have easily been duplicated or had dummy's, the team constantly having the evidence to incriminate each other and ...


22

Talents and skills are a subconscious memory, also known as procedural or implicit memory and often are excluded from amnesia, brainwashing or other memory damaging events. Memories of specific events are episodic or explicit memories. Each is stored in a different area of the brain. So, Sherlock forgetting an episodic memory like events with his sister ...


21

The cabbie is indeed shown to be terminally ill and wants to raise money for his family. However, this only explains why he resorts to killing people (=earn money fast). Motives of Moriarty are part of the bigger overall story arc in the Sherlock Holmes universe as Moriarty is the arch-nemesis of Sherlock. The poison pill trick is not random. The cabbie is ...


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