39

I never saw a definitive explanation, but there are three theories: Hypnotism (a person with Blackwood's personality and charisma is likely to be a good hypnotist). This is somewhat confirmed by the script (after Holmes stops Blackwood): The girl has snapped out of her trance, and is backing away from them as best she can Somewhat related to the first ...


18

I would actually place my money on Robert Downey Jr. having more to do with it, since he won an Oscar nomination for playing Charlie Chaplin in 1992, and therefore surely has seen Modern Times several times.


13

Dr. Watson is. In the movies and tv series, there is no clear answer. It's never really be an issue and so actors appropriate for the roles have always been hired, regardless of age. This seems logical, considering the stories took place over a long period (over 20 years). Considering a show like Sherlock jumps from story to story, his age becomes a little ...


10

Plot Devices. I've made that claim before, and I'll be making it again. People seem to think they don't exist, or that they shouldn't exist in certain movies... when in point of fact, they exist in every movie. Plot devices have even invaded so-called Reality Television. Let me make a few points on this specific scene. It begins at 45:00 in the movie ...


10

The bomb actually was a coverup to the assassination of the designated target. If the specified target alone is killed with the bullet, Moriarty might have deduced that any of the threads for plotting the murder could be traced back to him or his accomplices. So, he wanted to cover it up with a bomb to blow up everyone to spark a political conspiracy rather ...


9

No reason is ever given. The fact is that the "V.R." is taken from a description by Dr. Watson of Holmes' mannerisms from The Musgrave Ritual by A. Conan Doyle I have always held, too, that pistol practice should be distinctly an open-air pastime; and when Holmes, in one of his queer humors, would sit in an arm-chair with his hair-trigger and a hundred ...


8

After watching that clip, I have one more theory. Since it was Irene that calls Holmes away from the fight, it is possible that he is reminding himself to not let his feelings/emotions for Irene get the best of him and allow him to make a mistake. He says this before plotting out his attack pattern on his target to clear his mind and focus on taking this ...


8

Holmes works on pure logic and reasoning - it is a very important aspect of his efficiency, Being spat at made him angry and he had to resist the urge to let his anger cloud his judgement. He must not let it register on an emotional level and simply react scientifically to the situation, hence the plotting of attacks was based on damage caused and ...


8

You're talking about this scene at about 1:55 The "weapon" appears to be a charge-carrying part of some sort of electrostatic generator built by Reardon, but actually intended to be moved around. Presumably, the handle is insulated (e.g. made of wood) in order to protect the person conducting the experiment. Update: As for ...


7

The main reason is that he had not spotted that the open window gave Holmes an escape route and was therefore not in any kind of rush. Voices tend to echo slightly in rooms and the smoke was disorientating. Too many gun shots would have raised attention which might cause issues so he wanted to wait until he was sure he had a clean shot. It was only a ...


6

We all know that Sherlock was trying to leave the fight and walk out of the PUB. But after being provoked he takes a brief pause before he says the following line "This mustn't register on an emotional level"... According to me he said so because he did not want this humiliation to blind his judgement.... so that by mistake.... instead of just replying to ...


6

She was probably a mixture of drugged and hypnotised. Observe the power of auto suggestion in the film with the public thinking that Blackwood is a demon. Even the order (who are well-educated people) have convinced themselves they have magic powers. With the right conditioning, a cocktail of drugs and a touch of Hollywood "magic" (special effects) she ...


6

Because they liked both his star appeal and his acting for the role? Superstar actors get to play whatever roles they want. They cast Kevin Costner in the very British role of Robin Hood, for goodness sakes. At least Downey did a decent job of maintaining the same accent on consecutive sentences. This is a Hollywood film, and Hollywood is rife with, ...


6

He didn't. Somewhere after Sherlock seemingly predicted what the gipsy would say, he prompted her to mention "and the warts!". And Watson said to Sherlock something along the lines of "This is low, even for you, Sherlock" (Can't remember the exact line). And later, Sherlock compliments the gipsy woman, saying that her prediction of Watson's future was more ...


4

Modern Sherlock Holmes soundtracks (including Sherlock Holmes (2009) and Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (2011) by Hans Zimmer and BBC's Sherlock (TV series) by David Arnold and Michael Price) were influenced mostly by Patrick Gowers music for The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1984) TV series. Here's an example: ...


4

Aside from the good answers from a casting point of view, you're simplifying a lot here when it comes to American vs British. The Sherlock Holmes stories took place from about 1880 to 1900. Cultural habits, accents and so on will have drastically changed even within Britain itself since then. For authenticity there's no reason to assume a British actor would ...


4

Why did they pick Daniel Day-Lewis to play Abraham Lincoln in Steven Spielberg's film or Anthony Hopkins to play Nixon and the American war hero in Legends of the Fall? There are more cases where British actors played American roles and vice versa. Casting seems to be more focused on an actor's popularity and acting skills rather than their nationalities ...


4

Irene Adler is a character from the books, a woman that Holmes admired. She appears in Scandal in Bohemia, but is also mentioned in other works of Arthur Conan Doyle: The beginning of "A Scandal in Bohemia" describes the high regard in which Holmes held Adler: To Sherlock Holmes she is always the woman. I have seldom heard him mention her under any ...


4

I would suggest a few reasons: Firstly, Coward knows the location of it, but Blackwood is the mastermind. It's his men that are protecting the device. It could be argued that Coward knows Blackwood has taken care of the protection detail. Secondly, it could be argued that Coward, if he knew about the number of the men protecting the device, simply severely ...


3

To answer your question you must understand the way a criminal thinks. It is a known fact about criminal psychology that "Every criminal thinks he is the best and that nobody other than him is as good as him and he would not make a single mistake like others did earlier". This is a wrong self-esteem which often leads criminals the most to their danger. Pride ...


3

The purpose of the bomb was threefold: To conceal the fact that a single person in the room was to be killed To inflame passions in the country's involved to ratchet up tensions for Moriarty's desired worldwide conflict To destroy any trace evidence that any of the above had occurred. When the explosion is shown from the outside of the building, it is ...


2

Blackwood needed to be arrested and 'killed' so that the public would be aware and afraid of him. Once the public found out about it, his reputation would go before him and others, including senior members of the Houses of Parliament, would be more susceptible to blackmail. To be publicly executed, he would need to commit a crime to go with his air of magic ...


1

Blackwood was freakishly unlucky - perhaps doomed by his occult meddling During the final confrontation, with Blackwood's plans already in ruins, Holmes - either rheotorically or sincerely - indicates the spiritual perils that Lord Blackwood has been daring throughout the plot. Sherlock Holmes: You'd better hope it's just superstition, as you performed ...


1

The machine is very sturdy and hard to break. They seem to have difficulty and only manage it due to a flash of inspiration from Irene (I think). On top of it being a very sturdy machine: Approximately 5 men armed with pistols, knives etc. and one of them Dredger? This sounds pretty secure to me - I would not fancy trying to get passed them! We ...


1

By overwhelming even the sceptic Holmes, Blackwood 'proves' his sorcerous power Blackwood's plans throughout the movie rely on creating an illusion that Blackwood is a powerful sorceror who has risen from the dead, and can visit either blessing or damnation upon the country and its politicans. Holmes is known to Blackwood and Holmes' involvement gives ...


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