45

Clitoris, though it only rhymes with a specific pronunciation (cli-TO-ris instead of CLI-toris). It's discussed on the episode's Wiki page which also explains George's bizarre name suggestions (e.g. Loleola) and includes this little tidbit: According to the "Inside Look" from the DVD, the writers had trouble coming up with a name for Jerry's girlfriend, ...


26

Elaine is paraphrasing a line from certain movie. She was doing it out of frustration to mock the lady who was blabbering and kept calling her fiancé "baby". It's a reference to the 1988 movie A Cry in the Dark starring Meryl Streep, who uses a New Zealand/Australian accent, as this movie was based on a true story. The gist of that true story is: Azaria ...


19

It refers to a 1980 incident in Australia when a 2 month old baby was taken from her parents tent and eaten. Wikipedia says this: Her body was never found. Her parents, Lindy and Michael Chamberlain, reported that she had been taken from their tent by a dingo. Lindy Chamberlain was, however, tried for murder and spent more than three years in prison. She ...


17

I don't know about anyone affiliated with the show, but Barry Freiman (d. 2012) has discussed this. He was a freelance writer who, among other things, was a Superman guru, reporting and contributing to many of the Superman fan sites, e.g. Superman Homepage and Superboy Homepage. He wrote an article on the Superman Homepage where he stated: Almost ...


16

Newman sabotaged Jerry (and other characters) by being a tattle-tale, trouble-maker and "agitator" (S9E12). For example: He tattled to Jerry's parents when he saw Jerry making out during Schindlers List (S5E18) He tattled on Jerry for sleeping with a woman whose boyfriend was in a coma. Newman's dislike for Jerry appears to stem from anger at Jerry's ...


14

The scene is in reference to something else that happened shortly before that in the episode. George had asked a different stranger the time and the stranger refused to tell him; instead telling him to look at the clock on the wall. From the script. George: Excuse me, sir, do you have the time? Man: There's a clock over there. George: Where? Man (pointing): ...


14

NBC asked if I had any ideas for a show, and I said no. They sent me away to think about it. Then, a month or two later, I bumped into Larry David (co-creator/executive producer/writer) at one of the clubs in New York and I was telling him about the meeting. We were walking around near one of those little Korean fruit stands that they have in New York, ...


12

Yes, at least once. Jerry is using his computer in The Stall (Season 5, Episode 12) when Kramer walks in and asks to use the phone in his bedroom. Here's the GIF from the ep (I verified it myself):


11

Kramer had a ton of odd jobs. Including: Chief executive officer. (Founded the think tank Kramerica Industries.) Culinary entrepreneur. (Conceptualized a chain of make-your-own-pizza parlors and a restaurant that only serves peanut butter and jelly sandwiches called “P B and Js.”) Inventor. (Conceived the idea for tie dispensers in ...


11

We're not supposed to know, and that's the beauty of it. You have to know everything, don't you? (Kramer to Jerry, The Parking Space) There's no explanation provided in the DVD extra dedicated to this episode, but the episode's writers (Tom Gammill & Max Pross) say it was based on a similar incident from Jerry's life, where a woman refused to taste his ...


9

[I debated whether to post this elaboration as a comment but it would've been way too long, so I'll just add it as an answer instead if that's OK.] In the years since the Q&A were posted, a book called Seinfeldia: How a Show About Nothing Changed Everything was published which contains the full origin story of Elaine's dance (and an excerpt of which is ...


9

It was never mentioned in any episode, probably intentionally. The one episode where a woman yells "Goodbye, Norman" was a case of the actress misreading the script. Seinfeld wikia


8

It sounds like The Heart Attack and Wikipedia mentions.. After watching a science-fiction B movie (featuring a cameo by series co-creator Larry David), .. Which suggests the footage was made explicitly for the Seinfeld show. The conclusion of the description adds: The hospital television shows the science fiction movie again, and Jerry remembers ...


8

Of course it's a faux pas. A huge one If you come up to me and ask me for a copy of my loved ones death certifcate just so you can get a free flight I'd be massively offended and so would pretty much everyone else. Even worse...this is at a wake...the only way it could be worse is if you asked during the actual funeral! It's not as though he's actually a ...


8

It was just random inspiration. Larry David, Seinfeld's co-creator who co-wrote the episode in which the name originated (The Stake Out), says on a season 1 DVD extra: I don't know an Art Vandelay. It's just something that... came out. And you can see that in the episode itself, where it's randomly created as well when Jerry and George make a friend up ...


8

According to this fan-sourced transcript, the reason is unknown. Checking this fan-sourced transcript for “The Outing,” there seems to be no in-story explanation for Elaine refusing to take off her jacket. Look here; bold emphasis is mine: We fast forward a couple of hours and Jerry and Elaine are talking in the apartment. Elaine offers to talk to her and ...


7

Found it. The sounds were inspired by the character Margie Albright of a very old sitcom My Little Margie. The character Margie was played by Gale Storm. Michael Richards mentioned this in the extras of 3rd season.


5

Yes, he could be sued, but anyone can sue anyone for just about any reason - the question is would he win in court? Most employment in the US is done on an at-will basis, meaning either party can terminate the agreement at any time for any reason, so long as that reason doesn't fall under a few, very specific categories. Wikipedia lists a few protected ...


5

Newman, according to several accounts, was an employee at the Cooper Station Post Office, which is why (as you noted) it was often shown just prior to a Newman scene. It's quite normal for quick exterior shots to be shown just before an interior shot, both in movies and TV, to clue the viewer as to where the interior scene is occurring. Newman, as a ...


5

I highly doubt it. Aside from some physical similarities (glasses and squinting eyes) I haven't found them similar at all. Leonard and Sheldon are named (but maybe not character insipred?) after Nobel Prize winners Robert Hofstadter (1961 in Physics with one other scientist) and Leon Cooper (1972 in Physics with two other scientists).


4

One of the overarching themes of Curb is that almost every person larry is in contact with will eventually grow to dislike him. Because he is - simply - a selfish prick most of the time (and also has alot of quirks to go along with it). Jason Alexander is special in many ways. He is basically the person that merged with the character George Costanza (who is ...


4

Well there are enough similarities between Seinfeld and The Bing Bang Theories that somebody already has compared them. https://suggestsmagic.wordpress.com/2011/11/28/big-bang-theory-is-a-seinfeld-copycat/ Both George and Leonard share more features that just the looks: they both are obsessive, specially with details, not confident about themselves, they ...


4

I'd say he's an innocent savant, comparable to Rain Man. Kramer, like the Benigni character in Down by Law, doesn't possess intelligence per se, but an uncanny knack for living well and relating in any circumstances. In his case, it tends to mean unusual candor/views. Maybe a contrarian savant.


4

I can't answer the first question, as I have no official sources on the meaning of this joke (assuming it wasn't just a random "quirky thing.") Regarding the Youtuber's comment: Vodka is traditionally a Russian drink (commonly made using ethanol from potatoes) The commenter was suggesting his accent sounded Russian, and the reason he had so many potatoes ...


3

Yes According to Wikipedia: An alternate ending was also filmed. The jury re-enters the courtroom. When Kramer claims that a woman on the jury is smiling at them, Jerry tells him that she's smiling at them because they might go to prison. When it comes to the verdict, the forewoman of the jury states that the jury finds Jerry, George, Elaine, and Kramer not ...


2

Yes. Jason Alexander learned that in first season. This a video of interview with Jason Alexander who say that in first 8 episodes he had a scene where he doubted "reality" of it and Larry David said that it was exactly as it happened to him and how he reacted. And a cherry on top A ...


2

Both Pale Blue Dot and user1118321 have brilliantly explained the source of the "dingo" line. This post is meant to only supplement their answers. It's worth pointing out that Julia Dreyfus (Elaine) attempts to pull off an Australian accent in the clip, but isn't very successful. Whether the bad Australian accent was deliberate or not is debatable, but in ...


2

According to the script, Leslie doesn't have any actual words for her parts. In fact, her name doesn't appear next to any parts where words are actually spoken. Her parts say something like: (Leslie starts 'talking', Kramer laughs. Jerry and Elaine have no clue what she's saying. They lean closer) Listening closely to the scene, it does sounds like she ...


2

It's a well-known joke, based on a 'Catch 22' premise, known as 'closed-shop'. You can't work in a union job unless you are a member of the union. You cannot join the union until you have proof you have worked in that job. This used to be often said about the UK actors' union, Equity, until the law was changed to outlaw 'closed-shop'.


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