5

Lynch himself, as I see it, takes great pride in the fact that his films are not of specific genre. In many interviews[1] he implies that not only the meaning of his films are up to the interpretation of the viewers, but probably the genre also. It depends on the meaning that you, as a viewer, give to the scenes you see in his pictures, to interpret whether ...


3

The basic premise of the movie includes that everyone is hooked up to a central system, to which everything that people see is backed up. This permits authorised users (such as the police) to review the last moments of someone's life, thus allowing them to identify a murderer for example. This appears to be achieved through some kind of implant. The ...


3

Some of the greatest science fiction movies ever made more or less answer the question. The Forbidden Planet (1956) There is the goofy movie The Wizard of Mars (1965), sort of a low budget mix of The Wizard of Oz (1939) and The Forbidden Planet (1956), in which astronauts find relics of an extinct alien civilization. And of course how could I have ...


1

Something like "retrograde thrust". You pretty much nailed it there. It's usually applied to orbital manoeuvres since we currently don't venture out much further than Earth/Lunar orbit A retrograde orientation is one that has the ship facing in the opposite direction from its direction of travel in its orbit. A retrograde burn is one in that ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible