41

As I mentioned in the comments, movie editing software certainly was available in 1993 (see Jurassic Park for example). That being said however, I was under the impression that Schindler's List was deliberately filmed by Spielberg on black and white film, in part to prevent a possible future release of the movie in colour (which would have gone against his ...


25

I agree with the other persons interpretation that it is Schindler's hand holding / saving the Jews. But still the movie had one tragic aspect saying "Schindler could not save them all": The whole movie is black and white, but there is one girl with a red coat seen all over the movie in different places. And in one of the last scenes the red coat is seen ...


24

According to David M. Crowe’s book Oskar Schindler: The Untold Account of His Life, Wartime Activities and the True Story Behind The List... NO. Among the key revelations in Crowe’s book: Oskar Schindler did not write out a list of people to save, he didn’t break down in tears because he thought he could have saved more people, and it is unlikely he ...


20

According to the movie's FAQ on IMDB.com, Neeson's reason was "for respect and the fact that he was proud to portray such a historical figure." Also, the scene shows actual Holocaust survivors as well as the actors who played some of them. I believe it is only the survivors, not the actors, who place stones on the grave. So perhaps it would not have been ...


19

There is a simple explanation. The highlighting if the child in red (in an otherwise monochrome movie) was designed to put one thread of horror for one identifiable character in the midst of mass slaughter which would otherwise just numb the audience. In purely dramatic terms this creates a sense of identification for the audience who now have a human scale ...


18

The poster very accurately depicts the events in the film. That baby's hand represents the Jews survivors and that grown man's hand represent Oskar Schindler himself. This is about how he holds the hand(s) of Jews and ultimately saved them. If you look closely, the poster shows the Schindler's List as well. From IMDb Saul Bass was asked to design the ...


15

The previous answer is good, but for a little more detail of the tradition of leaving stones, here's my two cents. Jewish people leave stones instead of flowers for a variety of reasons, many with Talmudic roots that I'm not educated enough to explain. For a more complete explanation visit Mi Yodeya, the Judaism SE. However, one of the primary reasons is ...


12

From the words of Cinematographer, Janusz Kaminski “I was ecstatic to be working with Steven, and yet when we began filming it brought home the sickening reality of the Holocaust. The newsreel quality of the black and white seemed to fade the barriers of time, making [the footage] feel like an ongoing horror that I was witnessing firsthand. I ...


9

From this detailed analysis, The close-up shot depicting the joining of two hands is very powerful, symbolising unity and alliance as the Jewish people cannot make a difference on their own, and the bond between Schindler and 'his jews' is ultimately triumphant as he manages to save thousands of lives. The fact that it appears to be a child's hand joining ...


7

So they would not be confiscated by the Nazis. In the second world war, the Nazis raided the homes of both the Jewish population in Germany and the the population of citizens from other cities and countries they have invaded. They stole any valuables they could find, including gold and diamonds. This was then used to help fund the Nazi war machine. By ...


4

As per Wikipedia: Spielberg occasionally used German and Polish language in scenes to recreate the feeling of being present in the past. He initially considered making the film entirely in those languages, but decided "there's too much safety in reading. It would have been an excuse to take their eyes off the screen and watch something else." The ...


4

I'd suggest it is an SFX error. The rifle Göth /Fiennes is using is a 6.5 x 54mm Mannlicher-Schoenauer Sporter. It is possible for such an explosion to occur if explosive rounds were used. And, although there were explosive rounds used by German (and Russian) sniper's in WWII--called the B-Patrone--the calibre was 7.92x57mm. Therefore, the only rifles ...


4

The girl in the red dress in the film is different to the girl in the red dress The Girl In Red in real life was Roma Ligocka, who survived the holocaust and wrote The Girl in the Red Coat. She has stated that Schindler's List was the inspiration for her book, as she saw the little girl in red in the film and was reminded of herself. To quote from her: &...


2

4 times + ending Candle at the beginning Girl in red Girl in red (dead) at the crematoriums Candle at the ending Ending (Schindler´s Jews and descendants)


2

During the movie the only color is the red coat of the little girl. Specifically so you are aware of it and it is in contrast to everything else. I believe she appears twice, once when 'escaping' and again when you see her in the pile of the dead being burnt. At the end the film becomes colorized as the descendants of those Schindler saved place stones on ...


2

This poster show what didn't happen in the movie. Schindler didn't rescue the girl in red coat (true story) http://www.auschwitz.dk/redgirl.htm But he did rescue the people on his list (also shown in the poster). The idea is that although Schindler helped a lot of people he could not help them all. But as both lists are long (those who died and those who ...


2

The answer is right there in your question: labor camp. The Germans were at war and viewed all potential labor as a military resource. The Germans had competing requirements for war industry labor and military manpower. Making the Jews and other classes of people that were put into camps work freed up German men for military service. Goeth wasn’t sparing ...


1

It is called Recoloring. In the color correction you can "highlight" a color and set everything else black and white (saturation to 0). This is technique for very long time already. Like this


1

The red roses, I think, are supposed to suggest the little girl in the red coat. Much has been discussed, of course, about exactly what the little girl and her coat signify, but whatever that may be, I think the link is obvious.


1

If you watch the end closely you will notice that both the Schindler Jews and their actor counterparts place stones on the grave. We only see Liam Neeson's forearm and hand as he places the two red roses. I believe Neeson uses roses to show his respect instead of a stone and he knows his portrayal is as temporary as the flowers. Red was used as a connection ...


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