48

No...I don't think so. As you said, Kaufman's humor was entirely different from most other peoples. Here the "joke" is in the fact that Kaufman's "role" is highly specific. The only act he does is when the words... Here I come to save the day! ...are heard. The rest is in his anticpation of the line coming, his preparation for his performance and his ...


42

On season 25, episode 5, Garth Brooks played on SNL as Chris Gaines. At the time, there were plans to make a Chris Gaines movie starring Garth Brooks which fell through. He was still the host and musical guest of SNL as two different alter egos. EDIT: Here is a link to the NBC page which has some clips.


19

Here's a list of every host that has also been a musical guest, as found on Wikipedia ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Saturday_Night_Live_guests#List_of_Saturday_Night_Live_hosts ). I've tried my best using IMDb to cross-reference these 37 with whether they hosted and were musical guest on the same night, and whether they have appeared on Saturday ...


15

Yes: Curious About How Much SNL Hosts Get Paid? So are we! Fortunately, frequent guest-host Justin Timberlake has loose lips. "It’s the best $5,000 you can make!", he told Entertainment Tonight, before adding "If I wouldn’t have been lucky enough to have the profession I have, I probably would have gone through Upright Citizens Brigade and ...


9

Accoring to his IMDB filmography, he is credited with two skits, Season 22 Epi 5, Chris Rock/Wallflowers and Season 22 Epi 11, David Allen Grier/Snoop Doggy Dog. All of the rest of his SNL credits are either as Writer or Voice over work in other skits. One interesting tidbit (to me anyway) is that while Colbert was a writer for SNL from 1996 through 2011 (...


7

That discussion forum was right about the dates. The original air date for Chef's Chocolate Salty Balls is August 19 1998. Episode of Saturday Night Live with Schweddy Balls aired on December 12 1998. The most frequently replayed installment of this sketch, which originally aired on December 12, 1998, featured Alec Baldwin as Christmas treat maker Pete ...


6

According to an interview Justin Timberlake gave to Entertainment Tonight, yes. This was my third time to host and obviously I've done some appearances here and there when I'm in town... I really do adore the cast and the writers and everyone there. I mean it really is... there's no show on television in the world, not just America, that I can think of ...


5

You are correct that "to bite the big one" is an idiom referring to the death of the one who does the biting. There is no other interpretation I'm familiar with, either. So...explain the joke to me, please. People don't like to die, generally speaking, so why would a large fraction of a random survey say that they do? Logically, a large part of a survey ...


5

Yes. Jungle Book director Jon Favreau confirmed it in an interview once they got around to the subject of casting and Christopher Walken. He intentionally replaced another prop with it for this homage: Interviewer: Loved the cowbell reference by the way. So meta! Favreau: Did you catch it? I'm so glad it's in there. That was an on-set discovery. That ...


4

Saturday Night Live is a live theatrical performance, filmed in front of a live audience. Many similar shows close/have closed this way, including In Living Color.


4

Phil Hartman played Reagan in the sketch. He also appeared on, and wrote for Pee Wee's Playhouse which is the origin of the "Mecka-lecka-hi mecka-heinie-ho" phrase. It's likely that this was Phil just making a call-back or homage to his past work.


2

"Mecka-lecka-hi mecka-heinie-ho" was just a gibberish line Paul Reubens (Pee Wee Herman) made up. President Reagan was known to be a bit of a Pop Culture fan, and of course a former actor. He was also made fun of quite a bit by the SNL cast. In this skit, the actor (is that Phil Hartman??) is making fun of Reagan's lack of knowledge of International ...


1

You don't need to know anything about MM, but... cultural context always helps in humor. In this case, it's that that MM was an American 1950s hero cartoon, and thus had a suitably heroic song. He chose this song to work his magic, because it's dramatic. He could have chosen other songs, but an angsty folk song by a failed poet wouldn't have the proper ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible