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Hot answers tagged

74

The consensus on Space Exploration.SE where this same question was asked is... NO Answer by Mark Adler Well, developing low-thrust trajectories does take more computation than impulsive trajectories (e.g. like Voyager, which was done with rather primitive computers). You have no choice but to run many fully integrated trajectories. However it would ...


47

Unrealistic in every possible way It follows the standard film trope of electric shock - a bright spark, smoke, and the character blown backwards by an "invisible hand". It also assumes mere contact with the electric cable is required, not considering the circuit as a whole. And finally it assumes CPR will work miracles afterwards. None of these are ...


34

If Supergirl and I travel around the globe in opposite directions at just over mach 7, we should be able to create enough centrifugal force to slow the Earth's rotation. Is it really possible to do such thing in reality No. It's completely ridiculous. Physics doesn't work that way, nor does space-time. Indeed, the speed they mention "Mach 7" is ...


33

The revenue for Live Aid wasn't really from the ticket sales, it was from phone-in pledges for the charity fronted by Bob Geldof. Tickets were only £5, but included a donation to the charity, making entry £35 in total. The bulk of the money came from donations, on the day and following, and also from the DVD sales [much, much later I just realised, the DVD ...


29

Yes. In the shows this is the first time we've known rules about a knighthood been stated, so there's no other claim to compare it to. But, lucky for us, GRRM has stated it's either a knight or a King, but not a lord unless he's a Knight himself: To settle an old debate on EZBoard, any king can make a knight but any lord cannot. That lord must be a ...


28

I have never fired a ballista, but I am a certified marksman, and firing on a moving target whilst being on a moving platform (ship in this case) makes things extremely difficult even for an expert shooter, and practice doesn't help much since ships always move erratically, and I doubt they had much practice with scorpions. In my opinion, the odds of 3 ...


27

The following is my breakdown of the badges worn by Vicky Kaushal: In the movie, Vicky Kaushal's character is a Major in the Para Special Forces of the Indian army. An officer takes 9-10 years to go from Lieutenant to Major. And Special Forces is the front line force for dealing with counter-insurgency. They are kept at an optimal efficiency level to deal ...


27

The UK’s usage of the metric system is a mixed bag. Here’s a somewhat brief overview: Travel Large distances are measured in miles, with yards for shorter ones Speed is miles per hour, or mph Fuel is purchased in litres Fuel efficiency is measured in miles per gallon (1), or mpg The space within a car will be given in litres Around the home Weather is ...


24

Focusing on Timmy flying away from a fence when he gets shocked... Mostly realistic. Electricity makes you clench and contract some of your muscles. When a current above 10 mA travels through flexor muscles, such as the ones in our forearms that close the fingers, it causes a sustained contraction. The victim may be unable to let go of the source of the ...


19

Contrary to what @AJ says, you can't die of pain. Whatever causes pain - that can kill. Chronic pain can be enough of a stress to make you more susceptible to disease etc., thus indirectly killing you. But pain from a wound can't kill. Worst it can do is make you lose consciousness. The location of the wound is too low to involve the lungs. However, there's ...


19

It's a little-known fact that the U.K. is actually one of the few - if not the only - place(s) in Europe that still uses miles to measure distance! The U.K. does use some metric, but it's a bit of a mix, and distance is one of the areas where they're still on the imperial system.


15

The HBO show depicts events very close to the official soviet version of accident which was presented at IAEA meeting in Vienna in 1986 with Legasov as the head of the soviet delegation and which was used as the source for INSAG-1 report. As Legasov says in the show, many things they presented in Vienna were lies which put the blame on the operators to hide ...


15

TL;DR; All sedatives take at least 1 to 2 minutes before taking effect; hence, the immediate passing out seen often in Dexter is unrealistic. The biggest hindrance to opioids is BBB. Dexter uses a tranquilizer so potent that it will just kill the victim. Aww, there goes the speech. I can't recall any episodes with a different 'attacking spot' than the neck ...


15

The changes likely happened because they were fodder for "fish out of water" jokes, e.g. Jack asking for a "Coke". The movie's writer Richard Curtis has said that he isn't interested in the mechanics of how the blackout worked: But we never find out why a blackout causes the world to forget about the Beatles or why Jack remembers them. It didn’t ...


13

As per the Movie Mistakes factual errors listing this really couldn't have happened: During the first race a square plate on the floor falls off Brian's Eclipse. The Mitsubishi Eclipse is a unibody car; the frame and body are built as one solid piece, and it does not have floor pans. While some racers might put a steel plate in the interior as a ...


13

The Daily Bugle can be controversial but is not considered unreliable in the Marvel comics. It's a famous tabloid in the Spider-Man comics and is making its first appearance in MCU in the form of thedailybugle.net. There is a history of J. Jonah Jameson (the publisher of The Daily Bugle) to publish anything anti-Spider-Man. So it should not come as a ...


12

Dying from a stab can depend on a couple of things such as the targeted organ, depth of the stab, and lastly pain. We can see he was stabbed on the right side around the ribs. That's where your lung, diaphragm and liver are. The stab might have affected the intestines as well. We can see that she stabbed him with a big knife, so the wound might be deep. And ...


12

The bell is not moved by a rope. You don't ring it by moving the heart of the bell, but by moving the bell itself. The axis of rotation is at the top of the bell. It can be seen in this video. Such bells are chain driven (in the video, and, in modern cases, with electric motors). In the olden days they could be moved using a crank. The yoke of the bell ...


11

It seems very unlikely that the scorpion bolts could reach the dragons. According to Popular Mechanics, the Scorpion is based on a real weapon, the ballista. As Wikipedia notes, the weapon was accurate (when mounted on the ground) but also had an effective range of only around 460m (for the later Roman version). Presumably that is when used as a siege ...


10

J Michael Straczinski pointed out (sorry I can't find the quote) that in most space battles (at least in Babylon 5), seeing the ships up close to each other like that is kind of a dramatisation to make it look good on screen, and that in reality, space ships would be so far away from each other that they wouldn't even be able to see each other. This goes ...


8

Maybe, but the Post Office wasn't involved. The package wasn't delivered by the United States Postal Service, it was delivered by Western Union, a private company. Speaking as a former postal employee, I would expect them to lose it sometime in that 70 years. They may eventually find it... but find it and deliver it on time? Not likely. As a private ...


8

I have an example from the books, it's from the Hedge Knight novel. EDIT: After seeing the episode, emphasis mine as direct quotes from the show. “Hmpf.” The man Plummer rubbed his nose. “Any knight can make a knight, it is true, though it is more customary to stand a vigil and be anointed by a septon before taking your vows. Were there any witnesses ...


8

Something important to know about the writings of TV shows and movies in (almost all genres) but to keep things brief Sci-fi and Fantasy and their plot points. Is that there is always a certain demand of suspension of disbelief required for them to function. With that said, Fear the Walking Dead is a show about magical zombies with incredibly ...


7

Bank of England interest rate (which is a base rate, not the same as you'd get on the high street) peaked at 17% in 1979 but was still around 15% in the early to mid 80s. It's currently at a mere 0.75%. So yes, interest rates were massive at that time. The Bank of England is not a high street bank, btw, it's the authority behind all the money in the UK. ...


7

In the US, it is customary to begin and end conversations with salutations. This includes in-person, written word and spoken word. "Hello"/"Goodbye", or some variation (i.e. "What's up?!"/"Catch you later!", "Dear John"/"Sincerely", etc...) are standard for all congenial conversations. Hanging up a phone without addressing the other person is seen as rude,...


7

I think it is gibberish, because it lacks consistency. I will ignore typos as the code was a work in progress: Change Modifier Value Let's assume Change is a function and Modifier and Value its parameters else if pMParameterMode -- 2 then those -- are a comment or an operator? the word "then" is commented? ( if PM0fods - undefined and pM0fodsParam - ...


7

It seems accurate and not an invention of the HBO series based on these and other references. From the Wikipedia entry on Chernobyl: However, a dosimeter capable of measuring up to 1,000 R/s was buried in the rubble of a collapsed part of the building, and another one failed when turned on. All remaining dosimeters had limits of 0.001 R/s and ...


7

It's not really an exact scenario, but it should provide enough evidence to support the theory. This SlowMo Guys video captures paintballs being fired at each other in slow motion, and while both the paintballs are different quality, and the collision angle isn't always perfect, the paint explosion shows a consistent opposed force. ...


7

It depends. I work with electric fence on our farm all the time. If you are not grounded, you will not get shocked, so you can hang off an electric fence and not get any zap as long as you are not grounded out. Our fences use a ground-return design, meaning every other line is a ground line. So you can get a nasty shock touching the hot and ground lines. ...


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