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68

That all depends on how big the artillery shell was. A standard 75mm/18lb shell would have difficulty making a hole anywhere near that big, but the largest shell fired in WWI was 3,130 lbs! used by the 520mm French Schneider Howitzer... Somewhat more portable were the 24cm or 25cm Schwerer Flügelminenwerfer* which carried a 200 lb charge… *Roughly ...


56

Possibly the result of an underground bomb, placed there by miners: One of the common techniques used in warfare during the First World War was mining. There were various mines planted under trenches, then detonated to send part of the trench, and anyone in it, sky high. The BBC also did an article on this. National Geographic says of the Messine ...


21

Given all you see is the crater, there's no guarantee it was made by a single shell, though the odds are statistically high it was a shell given how many were fired. The biggest crater created still exists today in 2020, 104 years after it was created. The crater is 30 metres deep and 100 metres across (98 feet and 330 feet) and was caused by a 2,700 ...


18

In addition to the incredibly heavy shells that could be lofted by the artillery of either side, delayed fuzes were used which trigger a few seconds after impact, causing the shell to explode under the surface, pushing the ground advice up and out, and creating craters as deep and wide as you see in the picture you posted. Since proximity fuzes, which would ...


8

Using the support hand to brace the blade while blocking an axe swing absolutely makes sense, whether it would damage his hand or not. Even if the blade does cut his hand, that's still better than being hit in the face with a full-force swing with an axe, right? As for injuring his hand, it is important to consider that he's in the middle of a fight, has ...


4

It is a bit too big for an artillery shell. Others have shown the artillery pieces, and the mine craters. But few people today have any idea of how much the heavy artillery of the day churned up the landscape in general. The earth was pounded over and over for months, which means that eventually it was just a thick layer of mud (which got displaced even ...


3

As mentioned by BCdotWeb, the song is a well known gospel/folk song "The Poor Wayfaring Stranger" which talks about the difficulty of life and the hope of a heaven beyond. The lyrics would be very appropriate for anyone looking death in the face, especially during a battle where one is on the front line, as was the case of the men in the movie. They were ...


3

It is "The Wayfaring Stranger" a well-known American folk and gospel song [...] about a plaintive soul on the journey through life. Judging from the lyrics it seems rather appropriate for the situation those soldiers are in.


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