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111

Not everything has to drive the plot. His characters are supposed to be real people. Real people have those types of conversations. It humanizes the characters, whilst, at the same time, setting up the disconnect between their words and their actions. Take that hamburger conversation.. They're on their way to work, not at work. So they catch up, talk ...


86

Well for the first film and for most of the second, the Bride is on a revenge mission where she is hunting her victims. Her identity would have to be a secret to make sure she doesn't get followed or caught. It could be Tarantino's way of breaking the 4th wall and including us in the element of mystery and disguise that the Bride has to undertake to remain ...


70

From the script: From an interview with Uma Thurman: Why do they bleep your name? That one eludes me. You'll find out her name. You will definitely find out her name, I can tell you right now, but that'd ruin it. From an interview with Vivica A. Fox: What name do you and Uma say when they bleep it out? Beatrix. Her name is Beatrix. It ...


49

The problem with Tarantino movies is that they have been 'misused' when they were released. Kill Bill was originally scheduled for a single theatrical release, but with a running time of over four hours it was split into two parts by the Weinstein Brothers. However, it was written, shot, and edited as one big movie. Grindhouse was also meant to be one ...


46

Her name is bleeped because she cannot be named until she deserves to. Throughout the film she has 4 names. In chronological order the first event of the story is the wedding massacre. At this point she is Black Mamba. She is shot in the head by Bill. This is the death of Black Mamba. She wakes up four years later. This is the birth of The Bride. Now The ...


32

Because the plot is not the narrative A simple reading of a film plot will often show the primary narrative structure of a film: greed is harmful, and so the greedy villain is punished by losing their property, protagonists fighting violence with violence leads to the death of their loved ones etc. But there are many other ways to build up a narrative and ...


32

Tarantino is an odd figure, creating actual Universes for each of his characters that all tie into one another somehow. They are broken up in a few categories including the Realer than Real Universe which include his history-altering pieces like Basterds where these people are supposed to be living in a real world, as in the way Hitler was offed in this ...


24

It's simple, really. What most screenwriters do is to write the entire script in the same language (which, in the case of Hollywood movies, is English) and then when there's a piece of dialog that's supposed to be spoken in some other language, all you have to do is tell the reader this by adding a parenthesis between the character's name and the dialog. ...


19

I found the information from this site which contains the interview given by the animation producer for that shot: One of the most striking sequences in both Kill Bill films is the backstory sequence of Deadly Viper Assassination Squad member O-Ren Ishii. Tarantino collaborated with Production I., the anime studio behind Ghost in the Shell, Blood: ...


17

An explanation based on secrecy from other characters isn't self-consistent or internally consistent. She is hunting people who know who she is and beeping the name for the audience doesn't stop the characters knowing who she is (the name isn't beeped for the characters but for the audience). And the people she is hunting know they are being hunted by her. ...


11

Yes, all the films, including The Hateful Eight, are a part of the same cinematic universe. In an interview released just seventeen hours ago, Tarantino clarified that the films Kill Bill and From Dusk Til Dawn are the film within the films from the "Real Universe" that the characters watch. The "Real Universe" is the cinematic world where everything takes ...


10

Tim Roth's character in The Hateful Eight is apparently an ancestor of one of the Inglourious Basterds. From the ew.com article, How Quentin Tarantino's Hateful Eight links to Inglourious Basterds: Tim Roth (Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction) plays Oswaldo “The Little Man” Mobray in the post-Civil War western, and the actor recently told the Huffington Post ...


10

Fascinating question! According to the Pulp Fiction Movie Reference Guide, this scene is actually a direct homage to the 1946 film The Killers, "an American film noir directed by Robert Siodmak and based in part on the short story of the same name by Ernest Hemingway." The entry for "The Killers" reads: The Killers (1946): The killing of Brett mirrors ...


8

Tarantino Universe: Chronological order of the films: Django Unchained The Hateful Eight From Dusk Till Dawn 3: The Hangman's Daughter Inglourious Basterds Reservoir Dogs True Romance Natural Born Killers Four Rooms Jackie Brown Death Proof Planet Terror From Dusk Till Dawn From Dusk Till Dawn 2: Texas Blood Money Curdled Pulp Fiction Kill Bill Volume 1 ...


8

Yes. According to The Times of India it's based on/inspired by their affair. Initially, they cited a source close to production who commented: Vikram (Vikram Singh, the director) is a fan of both the filmmakers and he wanted to create a narrative around the affair between the two movie greats. They later confirmed this directly with Vikram Singh: ...


8

It makes the characters more real and relate-able. They seem more like actual people than caricatures playing rubber-stamped movie prototype roles. Actual people, when interacting, most of the time, don't have matters of grave import to discuss. So they have discussions that are goofy, trivial, insipid and mundane. Also, the way the characters try to ...


8

At some point, Bob smokes a Manzana Roja (Red Apple in Spanish) cigarette, and Minnie has a cigarette with Red Apple tobacco. This Fictional brand has appeared before in other Tarantino films, although I think this is the first time it's suggested to have a foothold in the Spanish-speaking market.


7

To add to Carl Fink's answer (don't have enough reputation to comment), Tim Roth's character's real name is "English" Pete Hicox, while Michael Fassbender's very British character in Inglourious Basterds is Archie Hicox. That's almost certainly the connection, or at least one of them.


7

One simple, superficial answer is that Tarantino is a genius at juxtaposing violence and comedy. Just when the violence gets too much, he flips to something absurd. However there is more to it than that, and the premise of your question seems to me to be entirely incorrect. Each of the scenes you mention does not seem to relate to the plot when you watch it,...


6

Tarantino once said that he got inspiration for this scene from Tamil language film "Aalavandhan"(2001) starring Kamal Hassan.


5

I'll add my two cents as a short video producer with a film degree. In that sequence, I think there are only 4 shots that actually show Jamie Foxx holding the whip and hitting the guy. The rest of the shots either show Jamie by himself marching forward and flinging the whip around, or show the guy on the ground with a whip landing next to him, or show ...


5

All sources claim that DiCaprio really cut his hand so it seems to be true and there is no reason to think otherwise. Here's a video with Christoph Waltz talking about that incident.


5

It was real. A simple Google of "Dicaprio cut hand" would have dug this out: Additionally, it's in a WatchMojo list of on set injuries:


4

I thought it was a humorously heavy-handed ploy to evoke Clint Eastwood's "Man with No Name" character in Sergio Leone's Spaghetti Western films.


4

Quentin Tarantino appears in several movies he has written or directed but not in all. Just some examples: He's Mr. Brown in Reservoir Dogs and Jimmie in Pulp Fiction. On the other side he only narrates the story like in The Hateful Eight or doesn't appear at all like in Kill Bill Vol.1 As mentioned before, you can look up at IMDb in which movies ...


4

Yes,it is indeed a part of the "Tarantino Cinematic Universe", as is evident from the following points: Mexican Bob smokes a Manzana Roja cigarette which translates to Red Apple cigarette, the infamous Tarantino cigarettes . Miny smokes Red Apple tobacco, another Red Apple reference. Oswaldo Mobray whose real name is English Pete Hicox, is the grandfather ...


3

I believe its a technique he likes to use to heighten the impact of the violent scenes in his movies. If you were accustomed to every moment being an action movie scene, those action sequences wouldn't quite have the same punch. In the scenes you mentioned are perhaps a more general use of the technique, but I've observed at least two situations where ...


3

For the Reservoir Dogs example, it's a smaller story before the larger story and in my opinion drives a underlying question. "Is there honor among thieves?" The bit about Madonna's "Like a virgin" is meant to establish time and place, as well as culture. The argument about tipping should appear almost humorous as a small 'honor among thieves' bit. Even ...


3

I don't think that there is a common theme as such. He's obviously a huge movie buff and he seems to deliberately mix and match from all kinds of genres and drop all kinds of references in there for other movie nerds to spot and (other than his grind house and B movie obsessions) would appear to be on a mission to make many different kinds of movie without ...


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