111

Not everything has to drive the plot. His characters are supposed to be real people. Real people have those types of conversations. It humanizes the characters, whilst, at the same time, setting up the disconnect between their words and their actions. Take that hamburger conversation.. They're on their way to work, not at work. So they catch up, talk about ...


49

The problem with Tarantino movies is that they have been 'misused' when they were released. Kill Bill was originally scheduled for a single theatrical release, but with a running time of over four hours it was split into two parts by the Weinstein Brothers. However, it was written, shot, and edited as one big movie. Grindhouse was also meant to be one ...


34

Because the plot is not the narrative A simple reading of a film plot will often show the primary narrative structure of a film: greed is harmful, and so the greedy villain is punished by losing their property, protagonists fighting violence with violence leads to the death of their loved ones etc. But there are many other ways to build up a narrative and ...


13

Fascinating question! According to the Pulp Fiction Movie Reference Guide, this scene is actually a direct homage to the 1946 film The Killers, "an American film noir directed by Robert Siodmak and based in part on the short story of the same name by Ernest Hemingway." The entry for "The Killers" reads: The Killers (1946): The killing of Brett mirrors ...


11

He was not at all insinuating anything - he was merely asking to have a private conversation with the farmer. What he says is: COL LANDA: Monsieur LaPadite, what we have to discuss would be better discussed in private. You'll notice, I left my men outdoors- if it wouldn't offend them, could you ask your lovely ladies to step outside. He only mentions his ...


11

Yes, all the films, including The Hateful Eight, are a part of the same cinematic universe. In an interview released just seventeen hours ago, Tarantino clarified that the films Kill Bill and From Dusk Til Dawn are the film within the films from the "Real Universe" that the characters watch. The "Real Universe" is the cinematic world where everything takes ...


11

Tim Roth's character in The Hateful Eight is apparently an ancestor of one of the Inglourious Basterds. From the ew.com article, How Quentin Tarantino's Hateful Eight links to Inglourious Basterds: Tim Roth (Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction) plays Oswaldo “The Little Man” Mobray in the post-Civil War western, and the actor recently told the Huffington Post that ...


11

THE 8TH FILM FROM QUENTIN TARANTINO These appear to be the eight: Reservoir Dogs (1992) Pulp Fiction (1994) Jackie Brown (1997) Kill Bill (2003) Death Proof (2007) Inglourious Basterds (2009) Django Unchained (2012) The Hateful Eight (2015) Source


9

Tarantino Universe: Chronological order of the films: Django Unchained The Hateful Eight From Dusk Till Dawn 3: The Hangman's Daughter Inglourious Basterds Reservoir Dogs True Romance Natural Born Killers Four Rooms Jackie Brown Death Proof Planet Terror From Dusk Till Dawn From Dusk Till Dawn 2: Texas Blood Money Curdled Pulp Fiction Kill Bill Volume 1 ...


8

Yes. According to The Times of India it's based on/inspired by their affair. Initially, they cited a source close to production who commented: Vikram (Vikram Singh, the director) is a fan of both the filmmakers and he wanted to create a narrative around the affair between the two movie greats. They later confirmed this directly with Vikram Singh: ...


8

It makes the characters more real and relate-able. They seem more like actual people than caricatures playing rubber-stamped movie prototype roles. Actual people, when interacting, most of the time, don't have matters of grave import to discuss. So they have discussions that are goofy, trivial, insipid and mundane. Also, the way the characters try to ...


8

At some point, Bob smokes a Manzana Roja (Red Apple in Spanish) cigarette, and Minnie has a cigarette with Red Apple tobacco. This Fictional brand has appeared before in other Tarantino films, although I think this is the first time it's suggested to have a foothold in the Spanish-speaking market.


7

One simple, superficial answer is that Tarantino is a genius at juxtaposing violence and comedy. Just when the violence gets too much, he flips to something absurd. However there is more to it than that, and the premise of your question seems to me to be entirely incorrect. Each of the scenes you mention does not seem to relate to the plot when you watch it,...


7

To add to Carl Fink's answer (don't have enough reputation to comment), Tim Roth's character's real name is "English" Pete Hicox, while Michael Fassbender's very British character in Inglourious Basterds is Archie Hicox. That's almost certainly the connection, or at least one of them.


6

Tarantino once said that he got inspiration for this scene from Tamil language film "Aalavandhan"(2001) starring Kamal Hassan.


5

Warren was attempting to evoke a reaction from Bob to confirm his suspicion that Bob was lying. The film establishes Warren as someone who regularly lies and fabricates stories, e.g., the Lincoln Letter, to get other people to act, or react in a way favorable to him. It's in character for him to make up the story about the sign. Warren had been doubting Bob'...


5

It was real. A simple Google of "Dicaprio cut hand" would have dug this out: Additionally, it's in a WatchMojo list of on set injuries:


5

All sources claim that DiCaprio really cut his hand so it seems to be true and there is no reason to think otherwise. Here's a video with Christoph Waltz talking about that incident.


5

I'll add my two cents as a short video producer with a film degree. In that sequence, I think there are only 4 shots that actually show Jamie Foxx holding the whip and hitting the guy. The rest of the shots either show Jamie by himself marching forward and flinging the whip around, or show the guy on the ground with a whip landing next to him, or show ...


4

Yes,it is indeed a part of the "Tarantino Cinematic Universe", as is evident from the following points: Mexican Bob smokes a Manzana Roja cigarette which translates to Red Apple cigarette, the infamous Tarantino cigarettes . Miny smokes Red Apple tobacco, another Red Apple reference. Oswaldo Mobray whose real name is English Pete Hicox, is the grandfather ...


4

According to CinemaBlend.com: Robert Rodriguez Directed Quentin Tarantino's Scene In Pulp Fiction It's always good to have a friend. Ever since they premiered their debut films at the 1992 Sundance Film Festival, Quentin Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez have been thick as thieves and frequent collaborators, resulting in notable team-ups like From Dusk Till ...


4

No, there is no depiction of collaborative effort to annihilate Nazi leadership because Shoshana and Marcel never met anyone from Lt. Aldo Raine's team at any point in the movie. Both plans were independent efforts. Though Lt. Raine's was much more detailed and thorough as compared to Shoshana's plan. I say so because Raine's main objective was to kill ...


3

I believe its a technique he likes to use to heighten the impact of the violent scenes in his movies. If you were accustomed to every moment being an action movie scene, those action sequences wouldn't quite have the same punch. In the scenes you mentioned are perhaps a more general use of the technique, but I've observed at least two situations where ...


3

I haven't seen any explanation from Tarantino, but I can assume it's to inject some realism: because they're people, and in real life people make the most stupid mistakes all the time. Too much good faith on other people, too much confidence on themselves, fear or whatever. Also as mentioned in this accepted answer, Tarantino writes the character's dialogs ...


3

I don't think that there is a common theme as such. He's obviously a huge movie buff and he seems to deliberately mix and match from all kinds of genres and drop all kinds of references in there for other movie nerds to spot and (other than his grind house and B movie obsessions) would appear to be on a mission to make many different kinds of movie without ...


3

For the Reservoir Dogs example, it's a smaller story before the larger story and in my opinion drives a underlying question. "Is there honor among thieves?" The bit about Madonna's "Like a virgin" is meant to establish time and place, as well as culture. The argument about tipping should appear almost humorous as a small 'honor among thieves' bit. Even ...


3

Quentin Tarantino appears in several movies he has written or directed but not in all. Just some examples: He's Mr. Brown in Reservoir Dogs and Jimmie in Pulp Fiction. On the other side he only narrates the story like in The Hateful Eight or doesn't appear at all like in Kill Bill Vol.1 As mentioned before, you can look up at IMDb in which movies ...


2

No. First of all we have to see where does this claim come from. You would have probably read this in a TOI article (Sorry unable to post the link). If you revisit that article, it seems more like a inspired by thing rather than being a based on thing. The director of Roy claims to be a fan of Tarantino and Copolla and yes the two directors did have a ...


1

'Opinions are like assholes: everybody has one': Inspector "Dirty" Harry Callahan, 'The Dead Pool'. Here's mine: Quentin Tarantino is not a bad actor; he plays limited character types. He's certainly fantastic at learning lots of lines, delivering them rapid fire and playing awkward types. Given that he writes the scripts, all the words are in his ...


1

Having seen the film a dozen times, and having read the whole script, I would say that Quentin Tarantino, the writer director, wants you to have a certain amount of respect for Hans Landa, up until that point that he no longer wants you to have that respect for him. That point being when he murders Bridget Von Hammersmark, an act that we need to see, so ...


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