104

So… why can't the actors just get it right the first time? Well, quite often they can. They are professionals, they do this all day, every day. They have learned how to learn lines, follow direction, and 'do the job they're paid to do'. Of course, no-one is going to do this first time, every time, but why can't they do it even sometimes? They know their ...


91

Everyone and their dog will go see the publicity stunt that is the first movie made in real space by a famous actor, headed by the world's foremost space agency and the world's richest egomaniac... Considering going to space now only costs in the low hundreds of millions and some movies produce over 1 billion in returns, you’re looking at a pretty good risk-...


70

There's a very simple structure that works very well. It's called a career. If you want a career in the film/TV business, it is not in your best interests to leak information. Sure, the further down the pecking order you are, the less likely you are to be trusted. A supporting artist (extra) won't even know the script for the scene they're actually filming ...


39

Other than the publicity stunt, which it most definitely is when compared to the cost of CGI, there is one thing we can't believably CGI away: microgravity. When actors are in harnesses to simulate microgravity, you can generally tell. Also, their hair will still obey the laws of gravity, as will any object they interact with. That doesn't matter much when ...


26

I'm not really sure I should be answering this one as well ;) I can, of course, in any answer of this type, only mention things which are "already known" Late addition I just spotted the opening paragraph of the Avengers leak linked in the question. It starts… "Thanks to an extra on set" This is why 'extras' [supporting artists] have ...


22

Actors (and the legion of technical staff, as mentioned in Tetsujin's answer) can't "get it right" in one take because there's no singular "it" that they're aiming for. The final form of a movie is in constant flux, up to and even after its release date. Scenes may be cut for time, or budget, or scheduling problems. Stunts or effects ...


21

According to this article: Not only are both cities very ancient, but Herzberg says they have also undergone “massive urban restructuring in the 20th century”. This has seen the introduction of modernist architecture and urban planning into old cities. As a result, Tehran and Athens have a similar mixture of what Herzberg calls “glum modern, Neoclassical ...


12

This answer has become significantly broader than intially envisioned. It is now in three broad sections. Potential size of set, for high budget shoots. How to follow rapid movement with a camera. How to shoot in restricted space. Potential size of set, for high budget shoots. As mentioned in comments, I ought to address the length of the corridors first. ...


12

I'm ignoring the accusation that these shots "look bad" which is pure opinion. I actually quite like the first ones, the second is just 'standard fayre' for this type of shot. These are artistic decisions, made by the director or director of photography, and in no way are due to tape-fail, generational loss or poor film stock. They are conscious ...


11

Tetsujin's answer is great and comprehensive but I would add about the second point in the question: "Causing disruptions in the day to day working of that public place...". In some places the authorities in charge of managing the day to day working of public spaces are very willing to make accommodations to get films filmed there. For example, ...


8

As you alluded to, I think we can safely assume it was money related, rather than image, as this was a major motion picture at the time produced by Steven Spielberg's Amblin Entertainment (nothing like a brand name to drive up the price). The request probably never even reached the band. Record labels in the 80s were at their peak of control and we know from ...


7

This entire question seems to be based on a misunderstanding of the term 'final cut'. The final cut is the very last edit version - the one that will ship to the cinemas. The script will have been finalised long before that; indeed it needs to be close to final before they even start filming. In its entirety, Welles is saying he has complete control of the ...


6

Primarily the answer is 'public relations'. The events of the last few weeks have significantly changed the public perception of the police and the Black Lives Matter movement. Fairly or unfairly it is now an environment where scripted or reality cop shows are less favorably viewed, therefore less profitable. In addition to this, it has come to light that ...


6

Film makers would not hold an actual horse race to have a race in their film if the actual events on the track were significant. Using stunt riders and horses and a variety of camera positions (possibly including vehicle-mounted cameras), they would film dozens of shots of horses running on the track with the horses positioned where the narrative needed them ...


6

In some cases, free crowds. Once I walked into a casino and there were big signs at every entrance warning that they were shooting a movie and that by continuing past the sign you were consenting to your image being used in crowd scenes in the movie. I never saw what they were actually shooting. This was long enough ago I doubt they were CGIing the action ...


5

There is no hard and fast rule but according to Wikipedia it's around 40-45% Box-office figures are reported in the form of either gross receipts or distributor rentals, the latter being especially true of older films. Commonly mistaken for home video revenue, the rentals are the distributor's share of the film's theatrical revenue i.e. the box office gross ...


5

Thanks to Tetsujin for the link Almost certainly not. The vast majority of pre-1930 film stock has been lost either due to destruction or simply that the nitrate film stock used at the time is was not suitable for long term storage. To understand how the movie studios and archives got into this predicament, it helps to know a little about what came before ...


5

Although somewhat rare in occurrence that there would be a single answer, it will generally depend on how far along in production and the circumstances. Since the director is mostly responsible for shooting the film, if filming has been completed, then often the studio will complete the editing and release of the film. This is the case when Joe Ranft co-...


4

An example of a creative way to keep a secret, in The Dark Knight Rises, for the funeral scene, was when Christian Bale was asked to show up (even Michael Caine was surprised to see Bale on set for that scene, so it was clearly kept under wraps as long as possible) in order to keep anyone from guessing that it was Bruce Wayne's funeral. Also the name on the ...


4

I don't think PAL speedup is the reason, because a TV show would not originally have been shot at a cinema frame rate, but at a TV frame rate. That’s not the case in many situations. Major TV shows have been shot on film at 24 FPS for decades. Also, the real question is how the HBO logo was produced and attached to the beginning of the show, not how the ...


4

According to Robert Sneddon on Quora, there were conflicts between distributor/production companies (Walt Disney and Walden Media, respectively) and Lewis Estate (owner of Narnia copyright). The Chronicles of Narnia 1 was a huge success and they decided to make sequel. However, it somehow underperformed and they were not happy with the profit the sequel made....


4

As you point out, filming Tehran, was not possible given the political tensions between Israel and Iran - for example, recently, by Iranian accounts, Israel assassinated their top nuclear physicist. The production team had to find a location that was mediterranean, surrounded by mountains, with narrow alleys and gardens with a profusion of jasmine and ...


4

This isn't an authoritative answer, but I highly doubt it. The show's regular narrator, known only as "French Narrator", is an homage to marine biologist and documentary filmmaker Jacques-Yves Cousteau, one of Hillenburg's inspirations. I expect that the narrator from Sponge on the Run was similarly intended to be an homage to Attenborough, another ...


3

That shot is there in Season 3, broadcast early 2001. By season 4 in 2002 it is replaced by two very generic scenery shots, which remained until the very last episode. As to whether anyone commented on it, I don't know, but there was more than enough to occupy people's thoughts without production needing to come up with an explanation for its removal.


3

While the accepted answer is pretty great, I thought it would be worth it to share information on a TV show that wrecked around two cars per episode for 147 episodes during its run from 1979 to 1985: The Dukes of Hazzard. As this post on Mental Floss explains; bold emphasis is mine: “Over seven seasons, the General Lee went airborne more than 150 times. ...


3

In the old days of colorizing film was done BY HAND. Literally painting the negatives and reshooting it to make a new frame. While color film was expensive, it wasn't for still images and records of the colors used in fabrics, and set pieces allowed them to pic the color they needed. Now it's digital, software analyzes the gray in the movie and assigns a ...


3

For the Blu-ray versions they might have applied various amounts of blur effects (smoothing out of grain) or sophisticated noise removal algorithms on the scan results. Moreover it is likely that they put more effort in digitizing movies which promised (in their eyes) higher revenue. So that's why decades-long classics might be prioritized over more recent ...


3

We shoot the news reporter stand-ups at locations around D.C. usually in the warm months. I play one of the ZNN reporters you see most frequently on the screen in the NCIS war room background. You may know me as the co-host of Live PD* on A&E and host of Wanted on that network, and from my 19 years as senior investigative correspondent on America's Most ...


3

Precap A preliminary summary of forthcoming events, especially at the start of a television programme, or before a commercial break. - wiktionary I have seen such precap in reality show more where they show the big mommet of the current episode in advance or some TV shows.


3

I'm not sure if this fits the specific example you mention, but since your question is broader, let me name some reasons that might explain the observation. I've no insider information on this topic, these are just theoretical trains of thought. Unsuitable Audio Sometimes the actor's voice is not recorded well enough on set because there is too much unwanted ...


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