15

It cannot be determined, but the chances of Keller being found by Loki is high based on Loki's expression after listening to the faint whistle sound twice and also we were shown in the movie that Detective Loki is good with details and connecting dots. In an interview with screenwriter Aaron Guzikowski it is explained that an ending where Keller is found by ...


13

I expect that if you really think hard enough, you can adapt prisoners to represent just about every character in the film. In terms of physical captivity, Alex, Bob, Joy, Anna, and Keller were all prisoners at some point. But Keller is also prisoner to his pride, ego, and way of life. He is a prisoner of his own self-reliance and suspicion of everybody ...


13

Here is the full text of what he says in this scene: Alex: I'm not Alex. I'm not Alex. Keller: What? What are you saying? What? What? Alex: I'm... Not... Alex... Keller: What do you mean you're not Alex? What? Alex: I'm not Alex. Keller: Just a second, I don't understand. Just talk -- just talk to me. Alex: I waited, and he never came. ...


12

First of all, Bob Taylor was once kidnapped by Mr. and Mrs. Jones, in the same way Alex was (and Anna and Joy for that matter). But Bob achieved to escape before getting killed (Mrs. Jones even mentions completely forgetting about him, until he appeared in the news recently). The reason why he is so deranged in general is just because of the traumatic ...


9

Sorry if this is a partial answer (I'll delete it if you think it's not up to standard), but for what it's worth, the script eludicates what Grace said: ANNA: The emergency whistle Daddy gave me. I lost it... (thinking) Hundred and thirty-three days ago. GRACE: She’s just like her father. So Anna remembering the exact day is supposed to demonstrate her ...


8

I don't think that there's any inconsistency in the fact that the girls were not killed immediately. The two other victims that we are aware of, namely Alex and Bob (Taylor), were also not killed. Bob Taylor escaped from the Joneses after three weeks (?) of captivity. So it seems that the modus operandi does not involve killing the children immediately. ...


8

The main aspect of Alex's character here is, that he had "the IQ of a ten year old" and he was bound to his "aunt" Holly. He was incredibly loyal and dependent on her due to the years of brain-washing (for the lack of a better term). I'm not saying he feared Holly or was actively threatened by her, but he was entirely dependent on her and unable to say ...


7

It's not specifically mentioned in the movie but we are supposed to assume that the girls went without their older siblings as a sort of innocent childhood rebellion. They wanted to return to the mysterious RV and play, but earlier their older siblings had kept them from doing so, so they deliberately disobeyed their parent's instructions. As for the ...


7

After an exhausting ordeal he's been through and after losing almost all hope, he hears "You were there" from Joy. Moments later he realizes where was the only place where he could've been heard (we see that clearly on his face), and it dawns on him where his daughter is (or at least was). Also, in his mind, Alex is still the guilty one. So, I see his ...


7

I think it is more of a commentary on the human nature and behavior under extreme circumstances. Yes, the setting is very religiously painted, but I think it is here more to emphasize the main message, and less to comment on the religion itself. Let's take a look at the two religious main characters. Keller Dover is a deeply religious, one might say quite ...


6

Bob Taylor was obsessed with this book and thought the described hypothetical abductor was the kidnapper that he fled from in his childhood, so much is clear, I think: So he read the book and decided he was taken by the "Invisible Man". The question now is, was this described kidnapper actually Mr. Jones? I think it is strongly hinted, even if maybe ...


5

Holly said that "adopting Alex helped [them cope with the loss of their son]. But [they] never got over it". From this I conclude that their first victim, Alex, was an attempt to replace their own dead son. But, since they never got over it (over their son's death), they lost their faith and went on killing children, as a revenge on God.


5

Short answer: the trauma. We didn't see much of Anna and Joy after being taken. There was just a short scene as Joy remembers it, and their mouth were duct-taped ("It put tape on our mouths"). In the hospital, we learn that Joy was drugged and thus almost completely unable to speak. Alex and Bob were both very traumatized by their kidnapping. Early in the ...


5

I've just watched the movie and then came here to look for questions asked about it. My interpretation of this particular scene is as follows: It was very clear to me when I saw it. Loki will find Keller and of course rescue him. Everything was set for it even from earlier in the movie when Loki came to Mrs. Jones' house for the first time and inspected the ...


5

The main example I can think of is the one you mentioned about calling off the surveillance from Alex Jones. He does this because Alex Jones is no longer a suspect and as he mentions in the movie, they couldn't afford to be wasting department resources. He's simply doing his job as superior to make sure their resources are used in an efficient and ...


5

The movie is unclear about whether the Birches will be charged. The Birches clearly aided and abetted Keller Dover, so if he is charged, they would likely also be charged with some lesser crime(s). However, given the extreme circumstances in play, it's not certain that even Keller Dover will be charged. When Keller's wife asks Detective Loki if Keller is ...


4

As we find out at the end of Prisoners, Holly was the one who kidnapped Joy and Anna. Right before Joy escaped, Keller had visited Holly's to apologize for how he treated her nephew Alex. They talked for a bit and Keller left. When Joy sees Keller at the hospital, she remembers him being at Holly's house. Joy says "You were there, they put tape on my mouth."...


4

The kidnapper Holly Jones mentions that she brought the girls from the underground prison to her house because she was lonely with Alex Jones gone. Joy's flashback in the hospital indicates that, at some point while they are in the house, Keller Dover shows up for his visit with Holly Jones. Joy and Keller's daughter are both drugged and mostly unconscious, ...


4

The faint whistling was actually supposed to make it harder to decide either way. The movie ending without it would have suggested they never found him. I mean it the movie way, not the common sense way. Otherwise I agree with chaitanya89 (see the first answer). There is some chance for him to be found. Loki is a tenacious detective indeed. However, I think ...


3

I'm not sure if the following is sufficient as a complete answer already, but it should give some insights into how Det. Loki was intended and what he might have stood for, even if not giving too deep an analysis of his character and its meaning: During his interview with Jake Hamilton Jake Gyllenhaal talks a bit about Det. Loki's character and what he ...


3

Well, Taylor is an adult when all of that happens but he was a victim to the kidnappers when the kidnappers were younger and practiced more occult rituals. He was tortured and tormented by them in ways more various and abhorrent than the drugged soda pop and mazes the current two girls underwent. So what we are seeing is nothing more than a broken person ...


3

We see him enter Anna's room at which point Mrs. Dover is awoken by a noise. The camera pans to her for approximately 20 seconds before she gets up and goes to investigate, more than enough time for him to grab some clothing and leave Anna's room and hide somewhere. There are two other doors in the hallway in between Anna's room and the master bedroom, a ...


3

Given the extensive focus on religion, it can be logical to compare the snakes from the film to the one from the Bible. I'm of course referring to the snake that convinces Eve to eat the apple from the Tree of Knowledge. An excerpt from Wikipedia: The Hebrew word נָחָשׁ (Nachash) is used to identify the serpent that appears in Genesis 3:1, in the Garden ...


3

Loki is investigating other leads, after the police chief basically tells him that Alex Jones can't be the guilty party. One of those leads is a known pedophile priest who lives in the area, and since it was two children who were abducted, it's not a bad guess when you need to leave no stone unturned.


2

I don't think it's inconsistent at all, because these were the first children the woman had taken on her own. She began the pattern of child snatching with her husband who is long gone, and she mentions that she slowed down once he disappeared. Also, these girls weren't the only ones to be kept alive as there's also Alex. She also says she brought them ...


2

I think that the answer is simpler than it looks. He is mentally very backwards and at the same time he is in a very hard situation to solve, his whole life he lives with his "aunt" who is his kidnapper and at the moment he has to deal with another kidnapping of two kids by his aunt (he just wanted to play with them). I strongly believe that it was ...


2

The ending was purposely left ambiguous. There was an original ending where Loki moves the car and finds Keller but the filmmakers changed it on purpose and the studio ultimately left it as is. The ending does show that Loki hears the whistle, but we don't see him actually find Keller. So it may be that he decides it was just the wind, or it may be that he ...


2

I'm writing this just to answer the "snake" bit. In the last scene of the movie when the CSI people are leaving there is this little chat between one of them and Loki: Loki: You all done for the night? CSI guy: Yeah, the ground's frozen solid. It's gonna take weeks to excavate the entire property. Just found some dead snakes and shit. It somewhat ...


2

An anti-religious commentary? To the contrary, the concept of "faith" is mentioned several times in the movie and clearly wins out in the end: the movie opens with Dover reciting the Lord's Prayer, an expression of faith in God "Pray for the best and prepare for the worst" is Dover's motto and it serves him well Even when everyone else thinks she is dead, ...


2

In my opinion, while it is possible, it is unlikely that the book is about Mr. Jones, the kidnapper. I base this conclusion on the presence of the maze and other circumstantial indicators. The kidnapper was wearing a pendant with the symbol of the maze. The book, Finding the Invisible Man, also has mazes in it. It even has a maze on its cover. Bob Taylor ...


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