16

From an interview (July 2013) with creator Jonathan Nolan: ... A lot of people who don't watch the show think of it as a kind of crime procedural, but we really think of it of it as a science fiction show. We think of it as a genre show, there is a lot of comic book mythos woven into it... From another interview (October 2013, shorty after the start of ...


15

Because it's a great disguise! For general, everyday, wear in a big city like New York, a simple dark/black suit is essentially anonymous. There are tens of thousands of men wearing them everyday throughout the city. Still, he got famous with name "Man in Suit" when Detective Carter started looking for him in Season 1 Exactly...all they could describe ...


14

Spoilers for the whole series up to S04E11! Here is a (maybe non-complete) list of reasons why Samaritan seems to be better than the Machine: As @mattiav27 mentions in the comments, the Machine has moral standards, hence the Machine will do not anything immoral to reach a greater goal. While Samaritan will stop at nothing. Samaritan has a lot more assets to ...


12

The password "Dashwood" is a reference to the protagonist of Jane Austen's "Sense and Sensibility" and it serves as a parallel between the novel's conflict between sense (logic, propriety, and thoughtfulness) and sensibility (emotion, passion, unthinking action) and Harold's internal conflict between letting the ASI's "live" (sense) or letting Humanity fend ...


12

The deal was for the Machine to save Finch's life, no matter what, however I don't believe there is any one episode where John explicitly makes a deal with the machine to prioritise Finch's life over his - it's been implicit from very early on in the show that Reese 'owes' his life to Finch, and that this debt has always been outstanding. According to Person ...


11

What is currently known is that between 2009 and 2010 Finch is involved in an accident and fakes his death [...] According to X-rays analyzed by Megan Tillman, Finch had a spinal fusion surgery as a result of his injury during this time period, possibly due to the accident. (Episode 1x04: Cura Te Ipsum) As a result of [the spinal fusion ...


10

He had visited the cafe as Harold Finch previously and made the same order with Grace. He then repeated the visit in his Professor Whistler identity and was recognised by the waitress. Samaritan could hear what the waitress said to him as well. Enough was the same for Samaritan to draw a line between the two identities. Bear in mind, in an early episode ...


9

Root tells Finch: Decima severed my link to the Machine... temporarily. But she didn't like that, so she wants you to patch 'these' into 'this'.     'This', the device on the left side, is (the internal part of) a cochlear implant. 'These', the three things on the right side, will presumably give her an umjammable connection with the Machine. According ...


9

The machine didn't get it wrong. The POI was the judge. Reese does think it was wrong at first: Reese: Finch, what's the son's name again? Finch: Samuel Gates Junior. Why? Reese: I think we've been following the wrong Sam Gates. Reese says it because the son is then kidnapped. But the machine identified Sam the father because he's the victim of a ...


9

The Machine was programmed to erase its memory at midnight everyday. But it has been evolving, it is always evolving. Evident by the fact it is talking to Root as an analog interface. In Season 2 Eps 21 - Zero Day, Finch learns about how The Machine has created a fake identity and a company who hires people to re-enter data after midnight, essentially re-...


9

While we are never given a direct answer to this in the show there are some factors to consider: The Machine was always a leaner system, capable of functioning to a very high level on much lower specification hardware than Samaritan (as seen "Root_Path_(/)" when in order to get Samaritan running Decima has to steal a bleeding edge high performance ...


8

The simulation's purpose isn't to see how and what "FRR" do, it's to see how "X" reacts. One of the comments we heard was: The purpose is to determine just how far alone the road to being reinvented as a Samaritan asset "X" is. Once Samaritan is happy with "X"'s responses, then the simulation scenario will occur for real, only by that point "X" will be ...


8

It's the number of different simulations run by Samaritan assets on Sameen Shaw. The purpose is not explicitly defined, but from context within the episode it seems that: However, that's just my interpretation - I'm sure the storyline will develop further in future episodes to confirm or otherwise.


8

In the courtroom Control, Greer and Finch were all on trial. So naturally Control would assume that Greer had nothing to do with it. Now in season 4 even if team machine decided to tell Control about Decima's involvement in Vigilance she would not have believed her, at least not at that point, because there was no proof connecting vigilance to Decima other ...


7

A simple Google search will tell you Provenance is: the place of origin or earliest known history of something. A more detailed Wikipedia listing describes it as: Provenance (from the French provenir, "to come from"), is the chronology of the ownership, custody or location of a historical object. The term was originally mostly used in relation to ...


7

The Machine is not omnipotent. It observes people and communications, draws connections, and makes conclusions. Now, in this case, that probably couldn't have happened: There was no communication to observe, since Kara was working alone, and had no need to communicate her plan and intentions.Luckily for her, POI is not a soap opera where they talk to ...


7

It should be noted that both the "base names" Harold Finch and John Reese are (IIRC), in fact, also aliases. As I recall, we never learn their original names. There are, as I see it, two primary reasons for keeping first names the same, one in-universe and the other out-of-universe. In-Universe It helps keep your alias' first name straight in your mind. ...


6

As Vedran Šego and Oliver_C mentioned in the comments, a lot of his assets are held by aliases. For example: Throughout the show, it's heavily hinted that Harold Finch is also an alias, and it's not the name of the man who died, that was Harold Martin. Harold Finch is very much alive and the owner of IFT, a software company. It's not really mentioned how ...


6

Because the Machine learns Yes, Harold provided the initial data and structure but Machine had to incorporate what Harold had taught it over several iterations and years. From there, the Machine learned for itself from observing not only Harold but other people and self-programmed. A simple analogy is a human (which is the point)....if a person dies, you ...


6

Here's how I see it: Each day, the machine calculates probabilities based on various inputs. We aren't privy to what those inputs are. But presumably, one input is "Finch and the team are working on this person," or something to that extent. It doesn't need to remember that because Finch is constantly searching for stuff on his computer and has pictures ...


5

One does not simply cut the feeds. To effectively do so would mean that no one and no thing could access them from outside of a closed loop. And to close the loop you'd need to put the surveillance equipment on an isolated power grid; isolate the harmonics of the room they're in, as well as disallowing all other wavelengths of energy from dissipating outside ...


5

It's probably mostly artistic / dramatic licence. From Reference.com As of September 2014, torn dollar bills can be exchanged at any bank as long as more than one-half of the bill is still intact. If this is not the case, then the bill must be examined by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing It is necessary to note a bill's approximate worth when sending it ...


4

I suggest re-watching "If-Then-Else"; I think the rules she means are the ones Finch taught her while teaching her chess. All lives were to be considered equally important -- but then she had to sacrifice herself in the name of Finch and Co.


4

Finch never referred to the Machine as a "she" until after Root did it; it appears to be something he has picked up from her. Before Root effectively assigned a gender to the Machine, Finch and Reese always simply used "it" or "the Machine" with no sense of any familiarity. Now that it seems likely that the use of "she" will stick.


4

John Reese is probably a high-functioning psychopath. His tone of voice is an indicator. Although other people might see him as a world-weary ex-soldier who has suffered through the horrors of war, he is probably one of those who cause the horror. He enlisted in the Army to avoid charges, served in Special Forces, and was recruited by the CIA as an assassin ...


4

I haven't seen the episode, but according to the Wiki: The device surgically implanted behind Root's ear is a cochlear implant, which is typically used for post-lingual adults with sensorineural (nerve) deafness. Root's hearing loss, on the other hand, is due to the loss of one of the conductive bones in her ear, a conductive hearing loss. ...


4

There are several reasons for this. Silencers are dead giveaways that you have no good intentions. Reese often pretends to be law enforcement or working for the government. If that alleged-FBI-agent suddenly pulls out a silenced weapon, people will get suspicious immediately. Silencers are not that quiet as movies would have you believe. There's still quite ...


4

The mysterious criminal mastermind known as The Voice has returned in the fifth season, in the Sotto Voce episode (S05E09). A bit more detailed answer with spoilers:


4

But if Terry's life was never in danger, then why did the Machine send his number?? The Machine doesn't just send numbers of victims. What the machine knew (or didn't) isn't clear but the Machine knew something was going to happen...it's up to the Machine Gang to figure out what. You are being watched. The government has a secret system, a machine that ...


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